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Full text of "The College Forum: Lebanon Valley College Publication (Spring 1896)"

Volume X. 



Number 1 



THE 



is 



College FoRun. 



i 

a 



JANUARY, 1896. 



f CONTENTS: + 



Jhe Statue and the Man, 1 

Tt »e Citizenship, 1,2 

Massive Hinges, 2-5 

Alexander Hamilton, 5, 6 

^«es in Spain, 6-8 

J d ;torial Staff, 9 

Editorials, 9, 10 



Senior Rhetorical, 10, 11 

Philokosmian Literary Society 11 

Kalozetean Literary Society, 11 

Exchanges, 12 

Our Alumni, . 12, 13 

Personals and Locals, 13, 14 

Advertisements, . 15, 16 



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THE COLLEGE EOEUM. 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Vol. X. No. 1. 



ANNVILLE, PA., JANUARY, 1896. 



Whole No. 87. 



The Statue and the Man. 

AN OLD GREEK EPIGRAM. 

Within a city of the ancient Greece, 
In times of Jason and the Golden Fleece, 
A statute stood. 

And by this marble man there moved each day, 
A multitude of trav'lers on life's way, 
In various moods. 

One day a traveller did check his pace, 
Astounded by the figure's earnest grace, 
And stopping, said : 

"What is your name O statute, tell me, pray ? 
And may the gods your silence take away." 
Then rose a voice : 

"My name, good sir, is Opportunity, 
And it my blessed maker gave to me. 
Sufficeth this ?" 

"Nay! Nay! but tell me who your maker was." 
"Lysippus, skilled Lysippus, sir, for cause 
Of good made me." 

"Whyare you standing on your toes ? Speak, pray!" 
"To show that I but for a moment stay," 
Spake out the voice. 

"Why 
"To si 



hy have you wings upon your feet ? why ? why?" 
!o show to men how quickly I pass by. 
Sufficeth this ? " 

c5? t 1 ( l uite > 1 lon g to question more. Tell why 
actl len gthy hairs upon your forehead lie. 
I wait your word " 

p at men may seize me when they meet with me, 
on my course past them I always flee 



Like swiftest wind." 



"Wh 



Th, 



To V Sy ° Ur head behind with b ^dness fraught ? " 
sn ow that when I've passed I can't be caught; 
And now begone." 



Truth V ' ler moved reluctantly and said, 

tn spake the voice from throat of stony dead," 
And so say I. 

Norman C. Schlichter, '97. 



Th 



True Citizenship. 



dpf *§ nest duty enjoined upon man, 
dc e irom that to his God, is the duty 
PR he owes to his home and to his 
Inland. 

tess sacred are the obligations which 



he takes when he becomes a citizen than 
are those vows which he makes to his 
chosen lifemate. 

When he swears upon his sacred honor 
to stand by the Stars and Stripes and pro- 
tect the virtues and liberty of his country- 
men he virtually says that he will aid 
in guarding the Nation against any evil 
that might be detrimental to its welfare. 

It is a grand thing to be a citizen in a 
Republic as great as our own. No other 
country gives better privileges or greater 
freedom to its inhabitants, yet notwith- 
standing this fact there is no more in- 
gratitude exhibited by any other nation. 

There are too many men who have an 
idea that this country was made for one 
man only and each one thinks "he is 
that man." 

Patriotism seems to be a wonderful vir- 
tue in some men when exercised upon 
any foreign encroachment. They are 
ready to walk right out upon the sea to 
meet and conquer any enemy who dares 
to insult or trample upon our American 
liberty, but those same men do not hesi- 
tate to monopolize law, liberty and every- 
thing good when they wish to gain posi- 
tion. 

It is not the outside influences which 
so much endanger our country. As yet 
we have been able to thrust off any hos- 
tility. Our greatest concern should be 
about those hidden evils that have be- 
come rooted in the ambitions of our peo- 
ple and which steal away the conscience 
of men and threaten individual liberty. 
Iyong speeches are made against anar- 
chistic orders and labor unions. Men de- 
vote their time and talents in devising 
methods for suppressing these evils. 
Addresses by the score are delivered be- 
fore large assemblies against intemper- 
ance and the many other social abomina- 
tions, but never a word is spoken against 
the wealthy employer who robs his la- 
borers to pay for legislation that will in- 
crease his own income, or against that 



2 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



other one who threatens to deprive the 
poor man who refuses to vote for a certain 
candidate. 

Speeches, I say, do not reveal these 
facts. Politics will not hear to it and 
men are too political. 

The evils upon the surface are agitated 
to the fullest extent ; but the hidden 
troubles are left untouched. Is that true 
citizenship where one man is forced to 
yield his rights for the benefit of those in 
power ? 

Every man, whether rich or poor, 
should learn to know what is his duty as 
well as his right. He should be taught 
that when the Constitution gives him the 
right of suffrage that it then becomes his 
duty to cast his ballot according to his 
best judgment. 

He should be made to understand that 
this is as much his duty as saving his 
own soul. 

Friends may advise, but let them come 
in equal with others when wanting favors, 
and those who come to bribe, he should 
shun as he would a poisonous reptile. 

He should be taught early in life that 
the strength of any nation depends upon 
individual loyalty and due appreciation 
of citizenship. 

Loyalty or patriotism does not consist, 
as some men think, in buying votes for 
the purpose of keeping some objection- 
able candidate out of office. Better a 
hundred times to have a bad election once 
in a while than to endanger the liberties 
or interfere with the rights of a nation. 

Our legislative bodies are full of politi- 
cal nuisances who figure as men. They 
are elected because of the weakness of 
the voter on one side and because of their 
power to purchase upon the other. What 
cares such a man after he once has his 
seat ? 

He represents the people with one bill 
and represents himself with numberless 
disgraces. 

After his document is presented to the 
house he takes his seat and stays around 
for his first week's salary. 

When not in session he may be seen at 
any other place except at a prayer-meet- 
ing, and his whole stay at the Capitol is a 
scene mixed with debauch and sobering 
up. Though this is not a universal fact, 
yet it is only too true in many instances. 

Is it any wonder that a cry for better 
citizenship should go up from the lips of 
our better thinking people ? 



Should we not love our country and 
principle as well as our loyal forefathers? 
The spoils system should be rooted out 
of our politics. It has cost our nation 
more than any other political evil. We 
see it in almost every department of life, 

It has even entered our churches and 
has found its way into the pulpit, where 
it has wrought its effect upon the re- 
ligious life of some of our best ministers. 
It is everywhere, wherever influence will 
gain position. Lives have been sacrificed 
and souls lost on account of its abom- 
inable influence. 

Better for us and future generations if 
that one who introduced this idea into 
the minds of the people had been para- 
lyzed in the utterance of the same. We 
need better and truer citizenship, and if 
that means better Christians and more 
religion, let it come. 

When men become true citizens these 
many evils can be overcome. When the 
value of good government is once seen a 
reform will then begin in earnest. 

Then the most worthy will rule. The 
people will choose their representatives; 
favoritism and sectionalism will be forgot- 
ten in the love of honesty and patriotism. 

The strong will respect the rights of 
the weak, and legislation will be for the 
best interests of all. 

Then will every citizen be an American 
citizen. Sworn allegiance will beforone 
flag and one country, instead of one 
country and another flag. „ 

Then will the ' ' Little red sehoolhouse 
have its needed protection and all will re- 
ceive the enlightenment that belongs to 
them. Men will learn to think for them- 
selves, and priests or Pope will be objjo 6 .. 
to lay aside their garb of Divinity andte 
their people that Christ alone can forg n 

sins - a the 

Then will the Church proper andj^ 

Gospel be spread to every land. - 1 

kingdoms of the earth will become i 

kingdom of Christ, and the nations « 

glorify God above all men. () 

That will be "True Citizenship- ^ 

Sheriden Garman, '9 • 



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Massive Hinges. 
As our beautiful world is con 



changing its form through those o^, 
forces of nature ever at work, the ^ 
tions of volcanoes and islands b^^tel' 
ied by the mighty ocean, so in the 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



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lectual, political and moral worlds, won- 
drous changes and great events transpire, 
the issues of which swing upon massive 
hinges. These events have their heroes, 
and for the cause of" their success we see 
emblazoned in gold, " Virtute et Fide," 
as the motto of their lives. These were 
virtuous, loyal to themselves, loyal to 
right, and had faith in the cause, and 
were faithful to the cause. It is our pur- 
pose herein to dwell upon a few of these 
hinges in history. 

Of all the holy men described in the 
Bible, none are more divine-like than 
Abraham — none upon whose loyalty and 
faith depended such great results. His 
beautiful life and faith and obedience 
show him to be fitted for all this. No 
one has been so put to the test as he was 
when commanded to sacrifice his only 
son. He was weighed in the balance and 
found not wanting. With him God made 
the great covenant by which he was to 
become the founder of the Jewish nation 
and the Jewish Church. From him de- 
scended Christ, the Saviour of the world. 

While a mighty power had been thus 
influencing the Jewish nation, other na- 
tions were at war, and by the outcome of 
some great battles important questions 
were decided. 

About 490 B. C, the Medes and Per- 
sians had pursued an almost uninter- 
rupted career of conquest. Greece was 
one of the nations yet to be conquered. 
Janus, King of Persia, sent Datis and 
Artiphernes to bring it into subjection. 
Alter they had conquered several cities, 
Jtoy turned their attention to Athens, 
inis city, hearing of the planned attack, 
felted aid from their allies. But on 
ecount of superstition, cowardice and in- 
ference, Athens must meet the enemy 
i'^e, and decide the fate 
they 



marched to 



of Greece. 
Marathon number- 



ed l0,00 °' to meet ^ e heretofore invin- 
ofth I I 0,00 ° Persians. The superiority 
ans £ ersions was known to the Atheni- 
an ^kev n ad swept over country after 
uutry. The Median, Lydian and Baby- 
empires had all fallen before them, 
^ju. Athenians under the command of 
The 6S were drawn U P in battle array. 
lovei Vast host of the Persians filled the 
Gree ground at their front - The fate of 
the £ e ai - 1( * t ^ le f uture of Europe were in 
w arr j pm S ? f Miltiades and his trusty 
of ^ 0r 5 ) * Without waiting for the attack 
e Persians, the Greeks charged and 



swept like a tempest from the mountains 
over the plain, pushed the Persians back 
towards the shore, and with great 
slaughter drove them to their ships. The 
most imposing honors were accorded to 
the heroes who had achieved this glori- 
ous victory. 

The battle of Marathon marks an 
epoch not only in the history of Greece, 
but in that of Europe. Hellenic civiliza- 
tion was spared to mature its fruit, not 
for itself alone, but for the world. Had 
the Persians won, Greece would have be- 
come a Persian province, and all the 
science, literature and arts which have 
made the Greeks preeminent above all 
other nations would have been swept 
away by the ignorant Persians. The 
influence which Greece, by her natural 
powers, had upon Rome when she was 
conquered by her is expressed in this 
couplet : 

" When conquered Greece brought in her captive 
arts, 

She triumphed o'er her savage conqueror's hearts." 

Had the high civilization of Greece 
been blighted in its development all her 
influence over Rome would have been 
lost, and, through Rome, over all the 
Western nations. 

Equally great with this is the mighty 
power of the Reformation. 

As a bright morning dawn is not always 
the precursor of a perfect day, so is an il- 
lustrious pedigree no indication of re- 
nowned deeds and great talents. That 
great instructor of mankind, the history 
of the world, presents us with exalted and 
beneficent men, who descended from par- 
ents of low degree, and whose own noble 
actions raised them to celebrity. A strik- 
ing proof of this fact we behold in the 
Great Luther, who was of the humblest 
parentage. 

We see him having nailed his ninety- 
five theses upon the church door at Wit- 
tenberg, and having hurled his edicts 
against the Romish Church, summoned 
by the Emperor to appear before the Diet 
of Worms. This Council was convened 
to break, if possible, the power of the Re- 
formation. 

The Reformation had become too vast 
a power to be managed by any ordinary 
means, and hence it was necessary that a 
combination of ecclesiastical and civil 
forces should try their united strength 
upon it. When his friends tried to per- 
suade him not to go he said, " No ! to 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Worms I will go, even if there were as 
many devils in it as there are tiles on the 
house tops." 

This journey to Worms resembled a 
triumph. Everywhere the people flocked 
about him. They gazed with intense in- 
terest upon the man who, single-handed, 
was going to meet the power and pomp ot 
the world. Thousands followed him 
through the streets. The courtiers of the 
Pope were in a panic of excitement. A 
man with living powers and vital energies 
had come ; a man with an intellect to 
think ; a heart to feel, and a strong arm 
to strike for truth, for right, for humanity 
and for God. 

As Luther approaches the hall, the 
masses of the people block the way 
through the streets, and, as he enters, a 
solemn silence reigns over the vast assem- 
bly. 

Every eye is fixed upon him. Luther, 
too, is silent, calm, firm. Not a muscle 
is agitated, not a trace of fear is discerna- 
ble upon his countenance. The case is 
opened. 

On one side are princes, dukes, ambas- 
sadors, in all two hundred representatives 
of the world's pomp and power ; on the 
other the poor miner's son, sole represen- 
tive of God's truth. There he stands, 
alone, defenceless. How easy to crush 
him ! yet, not so easy. Far easier to 
conquer a whole nation than him. He, 
standing on the Rock of Truth, is mightier 
than they all. The proposition is made 
to him to retract. Retract ! Momentous 
question ! History waits for the answer ; 
Princes, Cardinals, Popes, even, besides 
millions of other men, are interested in 
the issue. Human knowledge, human 
freedom, Protestant institutions, Protes- 
tant America, all hang in the balance. 
In answer, his voice rings out so firm and 
clear that it is felt throughout all Europe: 
" Hier stehe ich, ich kann nicht anders, 
Gott hilf mir." And the deed was done 
and the victory won. 

Akin to this in American history is the 
Emancipation Proclamation. We see 
America, our own dear country, cursed 
by the greatest of curses — slavery. These 
United States, whose people had fought 
so bravely for their own freedom a cen- 
tury before, whose Stars and Stripes floated 
with the breeze, telling of a people who 
boasted of their liberty — liberty of 
thought, liberty of speech and religious 
freedom; yet were binding men, their 



brothers, to abject slavery and servile 
subjection. Can such a nation prosper? 
These slaves brought from a heathen 
country, where the Gospel had not yet 
been spread and where God was a strange 
word, what can they think of their mas- 
ters, who, carried away by religious en- 
thusiasm, tell of a God of love and mercy, 
and yet, without mercy, crush them in 
hopeless misery. Or, who in political 
speeches will boast of their own free land, 
though themselves hold souls in bondage. 
Was it to be thus forever ? No. In the 
distance, from out the gloom, and tower- 
ing above his fellowmen, behold, the form 
of one who dares to tell of hope for this 
wretched slave-bound people. 

Let us picture for a moment this king 
among men, Abraham Lincoln. He has 
been thinking long and deeply, and now 
alone long after midnight, the light of the 
moon streaming through the window, re- 
veals the rough draft of the Emancipation 
Proclamation lying upon the table; this 
lone watcher paces the floor of his room 
debating the weighty question. Those mil- 
lion souls little know that even now their 
freedom is at stake. Suddenly he stops, 
and in a firm voice says, " I will sign it, 
for it is right;" and the shackles fell from 
off the souls of three millions of slaves. 
This was not merely a political triumph, 
but a triumph of justice and right as 
well. 

But the grandest work that has per- 
haps ever been accomplished is the work 
of Redemption, that wondrous plaj 
which existed in the divine mind from all 
Eternity. This could only be accom- 
plished by the Perfect Man; a Saviour, as 
had been promised to man in the Garden 
of Eden. This promise had lasted 
through the ages, giving light and hope 
to man. 

The fullness of time is now come, and 
all nature seems to throb with tn 
mighty hopes of years; and as the^ange 
on white wings sang at his birth, " G 10 > 
to God in the Highest and on Ear 
Peace Good- will to Men" the who 



aspect of the world is changed; from 
and strife and confusion to P eace jn 
love and order. The Saviour is r\o* . 



the world, born of lowly parents, reje 
of the Jews for they are looking tor 
earthly king who will deliver them 
Rome. He is called Jesus. When q{ 
thirty yeors old with a small nurnD ^ 
followers ready to beg in his worK, 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



5 



<roes about doing good, spreading his new 
gospel of love. 

But the supreme moment of his life is 
yet to come. We see him alone at mid- 
night in the garden, praying his Father 
that the bitter cup might be taken away, 
but still submissive: "Not my will, but 
thine be done!" Oh, the agony of that 
hour! So awful was it that the sweat 
rolled from his brow like drops of blood. 
Such is the terrible weight of the sins of 
the world. 

Later we see him bowed under the 
burden of the cross on his way to Cal- 
vary, having been condemned to die. He 
is nailed to the cross, and as the dull 
sound of the hammering is heard, those 
about him shiver with fear. The cross is 
set up and he hangs by bleeding hands. 
Still no cry of pain, only the exclamation, 
divinest of all exclamations, "Father, 
forgive them, for they know not what 
they do!" The agony of body cannot 
equal that of his soul; he seems to be for- 
saken by God, and cries out, "My God, 
why hast Thou forsaken me?" 

But look; the eyes open wide and are 
fixed upon some one, visible to them 
alone, in the far heavens, and in triumph 
the victim gives the shout, "It is fin- 
ished! It is finished!" Having com- 
mended his spirit to God, the tortured 
tody is thrilled with a tremor; there is a 
cry of fiercest anguish, and Christ's mis- 
sion is over. The heart, with all its love, 
is broken and human souls are freed from 
the bondage of sin and death. The angels 
that in triumph sang at his birth, flut- 
tering their white wings, seem to whisper 
trough the air, "Ye are bought with a 
Price, a great price." 

Ella Black, '96. 



Alexander Hamilton. 

In the progress of the history of our 
country, there were frequently times in 
j v hich all the hopes of future honor, fu- 
tUf e glory, yea, future existence, centered 
°n the solution of a single problem. 
. Questions not only involving the sav- 
t ?S of human lives, but the destiny of 
l °e whole Nation. 

ut > fortunately, every question has its 

x Pounder, every problem its solution. 
tv. 1 hough God requires mighty tasks that 

is work may advance, He also furnishes 
j^gntier men to perform the work. Here, 

e m ay be evolving a mysterious prob- 



lem ; yonder, He surely will be training a 
man shrewd enough to unravel the thread 
of His mystery and show the divine pur- 
pose in all. 

Such a man was Alexander Hamilton, 
and thus fitted was he for his special 
work. His mission was to place the new 
Nation on a firm financial basis, and he 
discharged it well. His whole life was 
God's training for this work. Born a 
British subject and of poor parents, who 
did not have the means to educate him, 
he was left in the hands of relatives who 
put him, at the age of twelve, in a count- 
ing house, in order that he might acquire 
a knowledge of business principles. 

Here we catch the first glimpse of the 
future statesman in a letter written to a 
friend, in which he says: "I continue 
the grovelling condition of a clerk, or the 
like to which my fortune condemns me, 
and I would willingly risk my life, though 
not my character, to exalt my station. I 
am confident that my youth excludes me 
from any hopes of immediate preferment, 
nor do I desire it, but I mean to prepare 
the way for futurity." 

Such thoughts as these from a mere 
lad show that he possessed more than an 
ordinary mind, and it was soon noticed 
by his own relatives to whom the boy's 
interests were intrusted. They accord- 
ingly provided funds, and at the age of 
fifteen he bade farewell to his birthplace, 
which was on the Sandwich Islands, and 
came to New York, where he entered 
King's College. 

While at college he threw himself 
heart and soul into his work, gathering 
up knowledge with quick apprehension, 
while the tireless activity of his mind 
continually sent his thoughts ranging 
into other and wider fields of finance, 
government and politics. 

His mind was first aroused by the 
Boston Port Bill, and doing what he 
considered his duty to his mother country, 
he wrote a pamphlet refuting with re- 
markable clearness the doctrine of the 
omnipotence of Parliament. 

During the Revolution he ardently de- 
voted himself to everything he under- 
took. As captain of a company of artil- 
lery he won great laurels at the disastr- 
ous battle of Long Island ; and after six 
months hard fighting, Washington ap- 
pointed him as one of his aids with the 
rank of lieutenant colonel. 

As a member of the staff of the com- 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



mander-in-chief his duties were varied 
.and highly responsible. 

He did not have that independent com- 
mand for which he sighed, but he was 
present at all the battles in which the 
army was engaged and won for himself 
high distinction. 

He was Washington's military secre- 
tary during the Revolution, and the way 
he exercised his judgment in answering 
the General's letters is remarkable. It 
was said by one of his comrades that he 
possessed the pen of Junius in the Amer- 
ican army, and to that gifted pen -Wash- 
ington owed much of his success. But 
he soon left the army, convinced that he 
could do more for his country in formu- 
lating plans for a better government. 

At this time there was not a bank of 
issue in the land ; the currency then in 
use was depreciating in value year by 
year, and his keen foresight saw that if 
something was not done to put the country 
on a better financial basis it would be 
utterly hopeless to try to reach the goal 
for which our forefathers were contending. 

He saw the needs of the Nation, and at 
once began the work to supply them. 

Being placed by Washington at the 
head of the treasury department, he saw 
that the time had come when he could 
place the Nation into a better financial 
condition. 

Money had to be furnished for the im- 
mediate wants of the new government, 
and some wise provisions had to be made 
for reducing the enormous debt which 
had been contracted. 

But how was this to be done with an 
empty treasury and without public credit ? 

Hamilton was equal to the emergency. 
He issued interest-bearing bonds and es- 
tablished a national bank. In these he 
perceived the means of restoring general 
confidence to the moneyed men of the na- 
tion, and by the issue of bank notes fur- 
nished a large addition to the circulating 
medium of the country, and a great ex- 
pansion of credit. He also was instru- 
mental in establishing the United States 
mint. It was he that advised the deci- 
mal system with the dollar as a unit, and 
it is to none other than to him that we 
owe our prosperity as a Nation. In the 
language of Webster: "He smote the 
rock of national resources, and abundant 
streams of revenue gushed forth. He 
touched the dead corpse of Public Credit, 
and it sprang upon its feet. ' ' 



After having succeeded in placing the 
nation on a firm financial basis and re- 
storing public credit, which events have 
been the means of making his name im- 
mortal on the pages of history, he left 
the management of the country's finances 
and began the practice of law in New 
York city. 

It is here where he came to a most 
direful end. Aaron Burr sought the Gov- 
ernorship of New York, but Hamilton 
rose up and denounced his schemes to 
secure it, which gave the election to Burr's 
Democratic rival. Upon this Burr deter- 
mined to have revenge, and set about to 
promote a quarrel, which finally led to a 
duel in which Hamilton was killed. 

Hamilton did not desire to fight, but, 
as he was an advocate of duelling, he 
would not have it said that he was a 
coward. 

Before the duel each man prepared for 
it in his own fashion, Burr by pistol prac- 
tice in his garden, Hamilton by settling 
the business of his clients, and when the 
meeting came Hamilton fell mortally 
wounded at the first fire, having dis- 
charged his own pistol into the air. • 

His sufferings were intense for a few 
hours, but death soon relieved him. 

The nation knew that a great man had 
fallen, and his death, caused by such bar- 
barous means, did more to stop duelling 
and make it odious than any other event 
in the history of our country. 

In person Hamilton was a man of small 
build, far below the average height; his 
features were thin and clear-cut, and his 
dark eyes had that fire in them that made 
his speeches so effective. 

He was a great orator, a distinguished 
lawyer, a master in finance, and he was 
undoubtedly the ablest politician of b is 
day and generation. 

C. H. Sleichter, '9 6 - 



Castles in Spain. 



A FANCY. 



Wandering over the beautiful hills o 
Spain one day, I met a friend, naffi e 
Duty. During the course of our cop®' 
sation, I asked her whether she bad & 
heard of my castles. Directing her a 
tention towards the south, we could 
four magnificent castles sparkling i 11 > 
sunlight. A little to the southeast sto 
the " Castle of Happiness," and not vw 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



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far distant from this the "Castle of 
Fame." Next could be seen the high 
"Castle of Benevolence," and to the south- 
west stood the last one, the "Castle of 
Long Life." These castles had always 
served to bring me that greatly to be de- 
sired feeling, happiness. But my friend 
did not seem to think that true happiness 
lay therein. To change her impressions, 
I asked her to accompany me to the cas- 
tles to take a view of their interiors. 

We first visited the ' ' Castle of Happi- 
ness." Before reaching it we passed 
through a most beautiful park, in which 
we were greated by songs of the nightin- 
gale mingled with the soft voices of run- 
ning streams. Near the center of the 
park was a magnificent lake enclosed by 
a marble pavement. In addition to the 
fifteen beautiful fountains which played 
in different parts of the park, the ground 
was strewn with lovely flower beds. We 
passed numerous cosy nooks, some beside 
the fountains and others scattered else- 
where over the grounds. As we drew 
near the castle we observed the dome 
projecting above the trees. The build- 
ing was magnificent to behold, built 
of pure white marble with the most beau- 
tiful carvings that could be imagined; 
above the door were life-like forms of the 
Three Graces. We ascended the twenty 
marble steps to the golden entrance and 
rang at the mosaic portal. While we 
were talking, the door was opened by 
a beautiful blue-eyed damsel, named 
"Love." Under her guidance we crossed 
the threshold, and were at once trans- 
ported, as if by some magic hand, into a ce- 
lestial realm. We first entered the vesti- 
bule of Anticipation. This room was of 
w &ite marble, the walls being beautifully 
c arved to represent different scenes in the 
youthful days of one's life. On all sides 
were mirrors in which were reflected 
glimpses of such wonderful beauty as 
served to greatly awaken our expecta- 
tions. We next ascended the long flight of 
jjairs to the upper halls. Passing hurriedly 
b Y many things, the beauty and grandeur 
J which it would be impossible for me to 
^scribe, we were shown into the cham- 
ber of < 'Peace/' f pure white marble 
Jtnout a flaw or a stain ; in the center 
1 this chamber was a beautiful fountain, 

anr! • 0n a ^ s ^ es were recesses or a l coves > 
n °- in them ottomans and couches for 
Qrei 




fre v y re P 0Se > in tne presence of the 
eshing sounds from the waters of 



re- 
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fountains ; everything invited us to indo- 
lent repose. The ear was charmed by 
the rustling of groves and the murmur of 
running streams. To the right we entered 
the chamber of " Hope," a room built of 
gray marble. The most striking thing 
in this chamber was the large inlaid star 
that flashed down upon us from a deep 
alcove, and that seemed to be made of 
silver and precious stones, fittingly called 
the ' ' Star of Hope. ' ' But passing by the 
many other apartments we hastened down 
the winding stairs to the inner court, 
called the ' ' Court of Perfect Bliss. ' ' My 
companion stopped, as though unable to 
go any further, when she beheld the 
grandeur of this court. It was lined with 
pure gold, ornamented with a network of 
precious stones. 

This castle as well as all others, which 
I called mine, to me seemed perfect, but 
as Duty turned her eyes upon me they 
seemed to say: " Is all this real happi- 
ness?" I felt a peculiar sadness come 
over me and began to see numerous de- 
fects in what I had deemed so perfect. 
Turning hastily away, I said: "Let us 
hasten to the other castle, called the 
"Castle of Fame." It was situated on 
an elevation of eighty feet, and was built 
in the ancient Greek style of hewn 
stone. Here we were greeted by Rumor, 
who acted as our guide. The most im- 
portant apartment in this building was 
the library, a large room whose walls and 
floor were of inlaid wood in different 
colors. Its heavy tapestries and Persian 
rugs made it a most delightful abode. 
Here were kept large volumes labeled in 
gold letters, some of which recorded all 
the good deeds accomplished by the 
owner. A few of these volumes were 
already filled, but most of them were still 
unused. As my companion offered no 
word of comment, we next visited the 
"Castle of Benevolence." This castle 
was not noted so much for its beauty as 
for its immensity ; it was one thousand 
feet long and nine hundred feet wide. 
Every one here seemed to be busily en- 
gaged in some good work. There was 
an apartment for the sick, where the best 
medical aid in the country was employed. 
The needs of the poor were all supplied, 
as well as everything which would give 
comfort to the unfortunate. 

But the very presence of Duty seemed 
to cause a sadness in my heart, and I now 
realized for the first time that, after all, 



8 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



this work which had been accomplished, 
had been done merely to fill the volume 
in my castle of Fame. Duty still re- 
mained silent. We hastened to the last 
of my cherished castles, called the "Castle 
of Long Life." This was a castle built 
of hewn oak, about three hundred and 
sixty-five feet wide, but indefinitely pro- 
longed ; it was continually increasing in 
length. It already covered over eighteen 
acres, being divided into innumerable 
chambers. Here dwelt four persons — 
Spring, Summer, Autum and Winter. 
We were greeted by Autumn, but only to 
Spring are the keys entrusted. At the 
end of each year she closes one chamber 
and unlocks another. Some of the rooms 
had already been closed, never to be re- 
opened. But there were others stretch- 
ing out before us at such a great distance 
that they gradually faded from our view. 
These would not be opened until the ap- 
pointed time. Each of these chambers 
were divided into twelve alcoves, of which 
no two were of the same kind ; six of 
these had already been closed. The one 
into which we were now ushered was only 
opened a few days before our visit. The 
most noticeable thing was the great num- 
ber of fine paintings on the walls, repre- 
senting winter scenes and sports, works 
by world-renowned painters. To the 
right of the main entrance was a large 
tower one hundred and sixty feet high. 
In this tower were one hundred chimes, 
which pealed forth at the opening of each 
chamber. Finally, satisfied with our in- 
spection, we turned away. Thus ended 
our visit to the fairy-like castles, but now 
how changed were my feelings. These 
castles had not brought the happiness I 
had hitherto experienced. 

Then Duty gently spoke, "Think not 
much of Happiness, for thy way lieth not 
among these low lands. The path thou 
oughtest to follow lieth over yonder 
mountains," and she pointed to a rocky 
range that rose clear and rugged against 
the western sky. "Wilt thou follow 
me ?' ' she said. A moment I wavered 
and then as she held out her hand I gave 
her mine, and we journeyed on. The 
way was plain, but Oh ! so steep ! some- 
times there were grassy nooks ; and once 
we found a noisy spring, with birds sing- 
ing in the trees, but more often our feet 
trod upon the uneven stones. As we 
journeyed on, onward and upward, a 
storm burst forth, and the lightning 



played among the barron peaks of the 
mountains, while the thunder crashed 
with deafening echoes from cliff to cliff, 
But still I kept my hand within hers, and 
amid all the uproar felt a strange, deep 
peace stealing into my soul. As we 
neared the mountain top, I beheld not far 
away a small cottage called, "Sunshine 
Villa." As we drew near it, we heard 
one of the inmates singing. We entered, 
This abode was vastly more humble than 
any of my castles. It seemed as if every 
one went about, not seeking happiness, 
but doing their duty. The beautiful sun- 
shine stole its way in the western win- 
dows after the storm, and to me this 
villa seemed the happiest spot on earth. 
I turning to my companion, in love and 
gratitude cried out, ' ' A thousand times 
sooner follow thee, O Duty ! than seek 
Happiness" "Without a word, she 
turning toward me. A smile of heavenly 
peace and joy illumed the tender eyes 
whose gaze was bent searchingly upon 
mine. Behold it was the face of Happi- 
ness and I found that she and Duty were 
one." 

Mary E. Richards, '97. 



In a recent number of College Life an 
author, commenting on the " Foibles and 
Abilities of Executive Musicians," says: 
" The clever musician is not always the 
great musician. In fact, this may be 
against him. Cleverness is too often con- 
tented with stopping short at the surface 
and may lack that steady application 
which goes to the bottom of things and 
which alone can insure greatness. 
deed, the works of the great composers, 
like the writings of Addison or Carlyle, 
show diligent application. If a musician 
has both these qualities he is surely not 
of the common herd. The great musical 
compositions did not bubble forth from the 
souls of great men. Such men have to 
delve to the very cores of their existence' 
Their inspiration was but the acconip an1 ' 
ment to severe effort. Rossini, after the 
completion of his " Overture to Will iaD J 
Tell, ' ' said he would not try again. ? e K 
haps he thought himself incapable ° 
again enduring the strain of composing 
second " William Tell." , 
Among musicians there are broad 
sympathies than are to be found any 
where else. If a musician is a friend 
is a friend, indeed; in need; anywbe 



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(1 I ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 

Harry H. Heberly, '96. N. C. Schlichter, '97 

CHARLES B. WlNGERD, '97. G. A. UlRICH,' 97. 

yf M Beattie, '98. W. G. Clippinger, '9! 



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TiTtf COLLEGE FORUM. 
EDITORIAL STAFF. 



H. CLAY DEANEK, A. M., 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher, 



A I.I" MM EU1T0R. 

Prof. Oscar E. Good, A. M. 



'94. 



SOCIETY EDITORS. 

Clionian Society— Ella N. Black, '96. 
Kalozetean Society— Sheridan Garman, '96. 
PhilOKOsmian Society— K. P. Dougherty, '97. 

BUSINESS MANAGERS. 

Ira E. Albert, '97. Chas. H. Sleichter, '96. 

THE COLLEGE FORUM will be sent monthly for one 
school year on receipt of twenty-nre cents. Subscriptions 
received at any time. 

For terms of advertising, address the Publisher. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as 
second-class mail matter. 



jEfcitorlal. 



A special meeting of the Board of Trus- 
tees was called for January 2d. Our next 
issue will give an account of the meeting. 



With this number we enter upon our 
tenth volume. It is the intention of the 
editors to make this volume as good as it 
can possibly be made. But to do this we 
need the help of every student, alumnus 
and friend of the College. We need sub- 
scriptions in the business department, 
and we need contributions in the literary 
department. We trust you will give unto 
ns according to our need. 



Our students have greater advantages 
to improve their powers of English corn- 
Position than those of many other schools. 
^ e side our good literary societies we have 
Weekly rhetoricals to which every student 
ls compelled to belong. But we fear that 
We are not making as good use of these 
rlle torical classes as we could, and make 
a P^a for better rhetorical work, both 
J e §ular and public. To write good Eng- 
lsh is an accomplishment which every 



§e man ought to possess. We have 



abu ndant opportunities for its acquire- 
^ let us not make half, but full 
of them. 



The Winter Term of the College opened 
on Monday, January 6th. Nearly all of 
the old students have returned and a few 
new names grace the register. We hope 
everybody is here to do good solid work 
in all the various departments. With all 
of our getting of wisdom, let us not fail to 
get good wholesome college spirit that 
will show itself by a live interest in the 
athletic, social and literary movings of 
the student body. Stand out boldly for 
the old white and blue. 



On January 17th Rev. Geo. Thomas 
Dowling, D. D., of Boston, will deliver 
the third lecture of the P. L. S. Lecture 
Course. This subject will be: "Bringing 
Up a Parent in the Way He Should Go." 
Dr. Dowling is well known in this section 
and needs no introduction to the people. 
His thought and humor are of the best, 
as twelve years of great successes on 
the lecture platform have demonstrated. 
Come and hear him. 



The books in the College Library ought 
to be rearranged at an early date. Often 
when we want a book of biography we 
are likely to find it among the miscel- 
laneous historical works or even on the 
novel shelves. Nothing can be lost by 
having a library in the best condition, 
both as regards cleanliness, arrangement 
and ampleness of space. But much will 
be gained. Donors will send their books 
more readily and in larger quantities if 
they know that they will receive good at- 
tention and place; and students will 
patronize the library a great deal more 
if they can get the book they want by 
knowing just where to find it. W T e trust 
the librarian will consider this matter; and 
if any of the students may be asked, they 
will cheerfully lend him their aid. 



A GREAT deal is being written in the 
various college magazines about the de- 
cline of college literary societies. And 
from the character of this writing we are 



10 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



led to believe that these greatest literary- 
aids to the college man are indeed in a 
retrograding state of existence. We say 
it is deplorable and think that the cause 
should be sought out and speedily re- 
moved. One cause, we believe, is the 
undue increase in the athletic interests of 
a college, and, if space would permit, a 
verification of this belief could easily be 
made. Another cause might propably 
be the undue growth of fraternities. 
While we are sad that the agitation of 
this question has been forced upon the 
thinking students in many schools, we 
are glad, however, to note that among 
ourselves we feel no occasion for alarm in 
this matter. Our three literary societies 
are all in a thriving condition and are 
every day bettering their members. At 
the same time it is true that athletic and 
fraternity spirit are not so lively, but we 
are content, for we have all the interests 
that we can successfully manage. 



Senior Rhetorical. 

The first public rhetorical exercises 
by the members of the Senior Class of 
this year were given in the College Chapel 
on Saturday evening, December 14, 1895. 
The attendance was large, the music of a 
very high order, and the orations fully up 
to the standard. The Rev. M. J. Mumma 
offered prayer, and after a few words of 
welcome by President Bierman the mem- 
bers spoke in the following order: 

Miss Ella N. Black gave a very graphic 
and faithful sketch of 11 Mary Lyon and 
Her Work:'' The subject was a woman 
far in advance of the age in which she 
lived. With meagre preparation for her 
work and scanty means to promote it, she 
early planned in faith to establish a school 
for the higher education of her sex and 
right royally did she accomplish her 
work. When, in 1836, the corner stone of 
Mt. Holyoke Seminary was laid, her day 
of triumph had come and to God she as- 
cribed all the glory. Other institutions 
of like character have since been estab- 
lished in several of the Western States, 
and though she has long since gone to 
reap her reward the fruit of her labors is 
gathered by others. 

' ' True Citizenship ' ' was very ably dis- 



cussed by Mr. Sheridan Garman. 
duty to vote intelligently and to help to 
promote the political interests of ou r 
country was warmly urged and the citi- 
zen's loyalty to his country's interest was 
declared to be equal with the loyalty due 
to his own family. Excellent suggestions 
followed as to how to advance the political 
condition of our country. 

Harry H. Heberly followed with quite 
a metaphysical discussion of "The Beau- 
tiful.^ The various theories, both sub- 
jective and objective, were in turn pre- 
sented and in clear cut sentences fully 
explained, but the so-called spiritual 
theory was pronounced the correct one. 
The science of esthetics is based on the 
beautiful. The speaker won favor with 
the audience. 

' ' Our Public Schools ' ' was the subject 
that claimed the attention of Miss Bertha 
Mumma. 

The early measures adopted by the 
State to provide for the education of her 
children, the present school law and its 
gradual unfolding under the direction of 
wise legislators were presented and con- 
sidered. Old customs were reviewed and 
the advantages of teachers' institutes and 
the compulsory attendance law discussed 
in forcible language and in a manner that 
evoked the applause of the audience. 

Mr. Charles H. Sleichter had for his 
subject " Alexander Hamilton" and in 
the progress of his oration held the un- 
divided attention of all present. Born on 
foreign soil, Hamilton early came to this 
country to be educated, and in time be- 
come one of the foremost statesmen of his 
day. While a great lawyer and an able 
debater, he excelled in finance, and to 
him is due in a large degree our past and 
present prosperous financial condition. 

"Woman in Shakespeare" was ti e 
theme for a fine oration by Miss Estella 
Stehman. Shakespeare excels in 
lineating character, and the three rep re ' 
sentative women selected for considerate 
were Eady Macbeth, Cordelia and Port 13 ; 
and in the discussion the leading charac 
teristics of each were fully brought out. 

The orations were in the main well 
livered, the thought forcibly and log lcal J 
presented and expressed in choice l d 
guage. . . . 

Rev. Buddinger, '99, filled the pulpjj 
of Rev. S. R. Rhoads, in Mt. Plea s3l) 
Church, December 8. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



11 



philokosmian Literary Society. 

Esse Quam Videri. 



OUR MOTTO. 



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convincing words, addressed the Society, 
enjoining the members ever to be mindful 
of the duties and obligations as Philos. 



Esse Quam Videri ! 

This motto thrills the soul 
Of every Philokosmian 

With zeal to reach the goal. 

Esse Quam Videri ! 

Thy noble precepts teach 
That one from thee must never swerve 

The highest truth to reach. 

Esse Quam Videri ! 

With new-inspired zeal 
We march beneath thy banner true, 

To make our life's work real. 

Esse Quam Videri ! 

When failures greet our view, 
The thought of thee, so noble, tends 

Our courage to renew. 

Esse Quam Videri ! 

'Tis proud we are of thee ; 
For thou hast led so many lives 

To Fame and great glory. 

Esse Quam Videri ! 

Long may thy influence live, 
Thy banner over many wave 

And truth to many give. 

R. P. Dougherty, '97. 

As the old year goes out, the new comes 
in. If the new year is better than the 
old it is so because our thoughts and 
actions are better. If the saying, "Our 
life is what we make it," is true, then it 
is equally true that each year, day, hour, 
moment is what we make it, for a life- 
time is made up of periods of time, great 
in their consumation, but almost insig- 
nificant in their beginning, so that, 
whereas our being starts with a moment, 
it ends with a lifetime. 

Our career last term, as a Society, was 
^at we made it. The present term will 
record worthy annals in our history, to 
that extent only to which our efforts and 
e *ertions allow. The past vacation war- 
rants a special effort on the part of all to 
Qo their best. 

At the last meeting of the fall term 
Joseph Kreider joined the P. L. S. We 
Jfcy say that during the whole of last 
term there were few meetings when new 
Jfmbers were not added to our roll. Let 
Jiose who have not yet taken this step 
, De advised and do so at the first oppor- 
tunity. 

R Mr. Meyer, an ex-member, and Mr. 
Jr^es, a student, visited the Society near 
ae end of last term. Mr. Meyer, with 



Kalozetean Literary Society. 

Palma Non Sine Pulvere. 



As the end of the term is approaching 
we find that our work has been a pleasure 
as well as a benefit. The meetings have 
encouraged by the full attendance of the 
members, and by their preparations show 
they have the welfare of their Society at 
heart. Although we cannot boast of the 
length of our programs, yet we can feel 
assured that our determined efforts will 
bring us success. 

The following officers were elected for 
next term : President, Howard Enders ; 
Vice-President, David Buddinger ; Secre- 
tary, Urias Brubaker ; Critic, Sheridan 
Garman ; Chaplain, Adam Weir. 

David Buddinger on the 8th inst. filled 
the pulpit of Rev. S. L. Rhoads, at Mt. 
Pleasant U. B. Church, Lebanon, in a 
very able manner. 

We notice the name of J. D. Stehman, 
'99, on the program of the cantata held 
in the U. B. Church, Annville, on the 
20th inst. 

During the term four copious ward- 
robes were made in the gymnasium, and 
this, with the various other improvements 
and active interest manifested on the part 
of the members, caused an increase in the 
number of members over other terms. 

The ladies, too, took an active part in 
the gymnasium, and we should be pleased 
to see them take even more interest next 
term. 

Several good records in jumping were 
made during the term by a few members. 
The several records and the names of the 
persons making them in the gymnasium 
will be published at the end of each term 
hereafter. Special periods will again be 
set for the ladies and gentlemen. 

We thank all for their patronage dur- 
ing the term, and kindly solicit it for the 

next term. , . TT w 

A Merry Christmas and A Happy New 
Year to all, is the wish of the editor. 



T Q. Deibler, '99, 61 led the pulpit of 
Rev J Light a few weeks ago m an able 
manner. He was accompanied by Revs. 
Baer and Buddinger. 



12 



TEE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Exchanges. 

We have received from the publishers: 
The Arts and Lettres Co., 874 Broadway, 
New York City, a book entitled, "Fables 
and Essays," by John Bryan, of Ohio. 
The book contains 250 pages, is printed 
on elegant cream paper and is bound sub- 
stantially in a tasteful style of Buckram. 
The contents are for the most part of a 
high order. The ' ' Fables ' ' are the best 
work of the author, but the poetry is much 
inferior to them. As a whole the book 
should please. For sale by all book- 
sellers. We commend it to our readers. 

The New Bohemian, for December, is a 
decidedly good magazine. Of the articles, 
the review of Eugene Field, by his friend 
and coworker, Leroy Armstrong, is a 
leading feature. "American Artists 
Abroad," by Harriet Connor, is an ad- 
mirable critique on the work of American 
painters at the Berlin exposition. It is 
rather spicy but sympathetically discrim- 
inating and just. James K. Reeve con- 
tinues his valuable series of ' ' Talks with 
Young Authors. ' ' Among the poets we 
notice such names as W. F. Barnard, 
Seymour Tibbals and J. Matthewman. 
The price of this magazine is as low as 
the lowest — ten cents a copy. 

We are glad to see the Irving Sketch 
Book again on our table. The exchange 
department of the November number is 
one of the best we have ever seen. We 
agree with the bright exchange editor, 
whoever she may be, in all of her claims 
for the exchange departments of the col- 
lege journals. The following short edi- 
torial is good: "Take time to read some- 
thing good every day. Grow familiar 
with the best works of the best authors. 
Use the library — that is what it is for. 
You are busy, we know, but don't be too 
busy to read. Here a little and there a 
little, and the sum total amounts to some- 
thing worth while. 'Little and often 
go a great way.' Have a good book 
always at hand and husband the spare 
moments." 

The Normal College Echo continues to 
be the strong paper it always has been. 
The poetry of the November number was 
of an inferior quality, however. We quote 
an editorial on "Note Books": 

"A great amount of very valuable time 
is spent near the close of each quarter in 
writing up note-books. While note- 
books are a necessary evil, they are a 
very serious one, if left to the week of 



examinations. All notes should be 
copied in permanent book as soon after 
being taken as possible. Several reasons 
suggest themselves. In the first place 
the ease with which one can transcribe 
them. Nothing in easier than writing up 
notes the day they are taken; nothing is 
harder than attempting the same work a 
week or two later. We, possibly, have 
written the notes hurriedly, and some- 
what illegibly, and, in consequence, our 
task is simply herculean to decipher 
words, let alone thoughts. Besides, all 
our time is needed near examination 
week in reading up our notes, not writ- 
ing them. Time which should be spent 
in studying the methods is often spent in 
copying the same, and when we enter the 
examination hall the habit has become so 
fixed that we still continue, perchance, 
in the same pursuit with fatal results." 

The majority of our exchanges are 
rapidly raising the standard of excellence 
in respect to the poetry of their numbers, 
We give an example : 



The dainty lustre flung 

From laughing maiden eyes, 
E'en when the world is stung 

With winter's cheerless sighs, 

Will make soft echo rise 
In harp that silent hung. 
Oh, dainty lustre flung 

From laughing maiden eyes ! 
The autumn song-bird sung 

Nor even dared surmise 
That all his changes rung 

Were but the vocal guise 
Of dainty lustre flung 

From laughing maiden eyes. 

—College Lift- 

TWIN TOKENS. 

I had a brooch, a slender thing of gold, 
And lightly bent, and lightly bent again. 

It kept, in token of the double strain, 
A dent within it. Then the brooch was old. 

I had a friend, with heart of purest gold. , 
That heart was turned— and then turned bacn 
again. 

It kept, in memory of the double pain, 
A dent within it. And my friend was old. 
—J. Matthewman, in The New Bohemia*- 




'70. 



Our Alumni. 

Albert C. Rigler is the oldest 
graduate of the College. He is teller 
the Annville National Bank, Secretary J 
the Lebanon Manufacturing Comp^ 
and an efficient worker in the Su flCl ^ 
school of St. Paul's Lutheran Church 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



13 



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Mr. Rigl er * s a warm friend of the insti- 
tution and is an annual patron of the 
College lecture course. 

'73. Reports come to us that Miss 
Sarah Burns has returned from her visit 
to the Pacific coast and that she is now 
located at Peoria, Illinois. 

'81. Mrs. Simon P. Light delighted 
the large audience present at the anni- 
versary of the Clionian Literary Society, 
with her excellent singing. When Mrs. 
Light's name appears on any program 
there is a sure guarantee that the house 
will be filled to hear her. 

'83. The law firm of Craumer & 
Milliken, in Pittsburg, is reported to be 
in a very flourishing condition. Elmer 
E. Craumer and J. Foster Milliken con- 
stitute the firm, and both were graduated 
with the class of '83. 

'87. Sarah Jane Waite has recently 
contributed several very interesting arti- 
cles to the Watchword, at Dayton, Ohio. 

'90. William R. Kellar, who has held 
the principalship of the Grammar Schools 
of Johnstown, Pa., for the last five years, 
has resigned to accept a lucrative posi- 
tion in the U. S. Pension Department in 
Philadelphia. 

'92. Hervin U. Roop, until recently 
Professor of Rhetoric and English Litera- 
ture in the Shippensburg State Normal 
School has resigned, and is now taking 
post-graduate instruction in psychology 
and pedagogy in the University of Penn- 
sylvania, and is also instructor in English 
in Rittenhouse Academy, corner of Eigh- 
teenth and Chestnut streets, Philadelphia. 

'94- William H. Kreider, student in 
the law department of Yale University, 
w as recently elected President of the 
Senior Class. The class consists of sev- 
enty-six members and has representatives 
from twenty different colleges and uni- 
versities, and this election reflects credit 
u Pon Mr. Kreider' s ability and popularity. 



Personals and Locals. 

Rev. Denlinger, of Penbrook, made a 
Peasant call at the College recently. 

G. Clippinger, '98, spent Thanks- 
S lv mg and several days following in New 
Jei "sey, attending to business matters. 

We were glad to welcome our friend, 
^er Heilman, who is at present the 
Private secretary of President Irvine, of 
jkreersburg College. He has returned 

° m e for his Christmas vacation. 



Miss Anna Grove, formally a student 
here, spent a few weeks in town, visiting 
at the home of President Bierman. No 
doubt her visit to chapel services recalled 
many pleasant recollections of her school 
days. 

What was the matter on the Saturday 
evening after Thanksgiving when hardly 
a single student could be found in the 
building ? Female attraction must have 
been stronger than usual. 

Mr. John Hoy, a tester in the labora- 
tory at Steelton, visited his cousin Harry 
Hoy, at College last month. 

Mr. A. P. Grove, of Scotland, a former 
student, delighted his many friends at 
College by a visit on the 28th ult. We 
are afraid it was not his male friends but 
rather some other tender invisible cord 
which drew him hither. 

Miss Stehman, '96, was agreeably sur- 
prised by a visit from her sister Lizzie on 
the 28th ult. 

Howard Enders, '98, made a flying 
trip to Myerstown last month on private 
business pertaining to the heart. 

At last after many years of star-gazing 
one of our fair sex has actually seen a 
" shooting star " for the first time in her 
life. We congratulate her upon her suc- 
cess, but as to her name, would simply 
say that she is one of our " Stars." 

The three literary societies have sus- 
pended their regular sessions quite fre- 
quently of late, owing to the entertain- 
ments and religious meetings during the 
week of prayer. 

Mr. Alexander Jenkins, a congrega- 
tional minister, met with us in chapel ex- 
ercises on the 10th inst. He expects to 
enter College here at the beginning of the 
spring term. 

B. E. Peters, a former student, spent a 
couple days with us the beginning of his 
Christmas vacation. He has been at- 
tending Oberlin Business College the past 

^Misses Nellie Yingst and Kathryn 
Schropp, of Lebanon, were the guests of 
Stella Smith, '99, a few days last month. 

On account of illness and, perhaps, 
love-sickness, Baer, '99. surprised his 
friends at home by a visit during the 
earlier part of the month. 

The lecture course given by the Leb- 
anon County Teachers' Institute, at Leb- 
anon, last month, was patronized by a 
large number of students. Two splendid 
lectures were delivered: "The Fate of 




14 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Republics" by Mrs. Anna Shaw, and 
"Savanarola" by Dr. Crawford. 

Again has the cupalo been graced with 
a flag placed there in the dead of night 
by the class of '99. But its visit seems 
to have been of short duration, as it sud- 
denly disappeared on the night of 8th 
inst. 

Miss Mollie Painter, of Myerstown, 
was the guest of Miss Kauffman over 
Thanksgiving. She visited College and 
seemed to be well pleased with its sur- 
roundings. 

Beattie, '98, again made one of his 
suspicious disappearances on the nth 
ult. The why and the zvherefore are, as 
usual, a mystery. 

The Senior astronomy class have been 
out frequently during the last month with 
the large telescope, making observations 
of the heavens, but have not, as yet, dis- 
covered any new stars or planets. 

A delightful cantata, entitled "The 
Prince of Peace," was given by the 
United Brethren Church choir on the 
20th ult. A number of extra singers were 
added to the choir for the occasion, of 
which consist a number of our boarding 
students; namely, Miss Myers, Miss 
Stehman and Messrs. Sleichter, Heberly, 
Deibler, Stehman and Hertzog. 

The College Quartet were called to 
Pine Grove on the nth ult. to furnish 
the music for a lecture given in the Re- 
formed Church, by Rev. Wicks, of Ursi- 
nus College. They report having had an 
enjoyable time. 

Rev. C. J. Kephart, D. D., delivered 
an excellent sermon on Thanksgiving 
morning in the Evangelical Lutheran 
Church. A number of students were in 
attendance, appreciating the appropriate 
and stirring words of the reverend gen- 
tleman. 

Long before 12 o'clock on Thanks- 
giving Day anxious students impatiently 
examined their watches for the approach 
of the dinner hour, as that meant a rare 
treat. They were not disappointed, for 
the tables were all laden with good 
things. Justice was done to it, as could 
be seen by different remarks passed — " I 
wish I could weigh myself," etc. 

The anniversary exercises of the Clion- 
ian Literary Society, held on November 
28th, were a crowning success. An unu- 
sually large audience crowded the chapel 
to its utmost capacity. Fine oratory and 
music were not lacking, and the hearers 



were soon captivated, as was shown by 
their wrapt attention. We doubt not but 
that " Clio " herself would have felt hon- 
ored could she have witnessed the oc- 
casion. The following was the program 
as rendered : 

PROGRAM. 

Instrumental Duet— (Two pianos) Rondo Brillante . Jfohr 
Misses Katharine Mumma and Estelle Stehman.' 

INVOCATION. 

Instrumental Solo — Fantaisie LevWk 

Miss Mary E. Kreider. ' ' y " 

Oration— "Massive Hinges" Ella N Black 

Vocal Solo-Sognai Schira 

Mrs. Simon P. Light. 

Critique-^' Marcella" Estelle Stehman 

hulogy— England s Queen of the Sixteenth Century. 

S. Blanche Kephart. 

Instrumental Quartet— Le Regata Veneziana Liszt 

Misses Black, Mayer, Ruth Mumma and Annie Kreider. 
Clionian Essay— "The New Woman". . Mrs. Lizzie VV. Graff 

Chorus — With Joy We Crown Bordese 

Misses Mary Kreider, Richards, Katharine Mumma, Leh- 
man, Keller, Batdorf, Meyers and Bertha Mumma. 

After the exercises of the evening a 
delightful reception was tendered by the 
" Clios" in the " Ladies' Hall." 

The time was passed very pleasantly in 
social amusements, enlivened by orchestra 
music. Last, but not least, were the re- 
freshments served in abundance. Our 
best wishes are always with our sister 
Society. 

On Friday evening, December 6, J. 
Edmund V. Cooke, the poet-reader, gave 
a delightful entertainment in the chapel, 
as the second of the course of lectures 
given under the management of the P. 
L- S. The selections rendered were of a 
high order and showed the remarkable 
power of delineating human character, 
which has made Mr. Cooke so popular as 
an entertainer. 

The rhetorical exercises of the Junior 
Class which were rendered the evening of 
the 7th ult., showed much careful prep- 
aration on the part of the participants in 
general, and under the drill of Professor 
Deaner, who had them in charge, they 
delivered their orations creditably. The 
following is the program as rendered : 

Piano Dubt— (Two Pianos)— Morceaux Melodieux, . Gurli"' 
Miss Ruth Mumma and Mr. Howard Henry. 

INVOCATION— Rby. W. H. Lbwars. 

Piano Solo— Impromptu Mazourka Bo 

Miss Bertha Mayer. „ .,u, rt 

Oration— Heirs of the Ages, Ira E. AIW»- 

Oration— Character and Education R. P. ^ u fr]S 

Oration— Lynching and its Cure, Geo. Uir 

Mixed Quartet— The Miller M u iv 

Misses Stehman and Black, Messrs. Deibler aud Heberiy- 

Oration— The Chase for Riches, Chas. B. WJ^d 

Oration— Castles in Spain, Mary RJSSj, 

Oration— A Dark Cloud, Adam Uin> 

Vocal Quartet— O Restless Sea ! C. A. 

college male quartet. a 

Oration— Indolence .... Harry B°7 ' 

ORATioN-Milton's Political Life, .... N. C ^-ZjeS- 

Piano ^'olo— Norwegian Caprice, 

Miss Stella Sargent. 




lack 



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bin 



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re- 
ur 

;er i 



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of 

P" 
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,or 
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he 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



15 




SMITH & CO., no., 

Engravers and Stationers, 

1022 WALNUT STREET, 

Philadelphia. 



Third Number 



-OF- 



he F. L. S. Lecture Course 



-FOR- 



1895-1896? 



Friday Evening, Jan. 17. 




I. GEO. T. 

Lecturer, of Boston. 



DON'T FAIL TO HEAR HIM. 



qumberland valley railroad. 

time table-may 20, 1895. 



ADMISSION, 



50 CENTS. 



Down Trains. 




No 


2 


No. 4 


No. 6 


No. 8 


No.10 






"A. 


M. 


fA.M. 


tP.M. 


fP. M. 


*P. M. 










7 15 




2 30 


515 








8 00 




3 20 


6 43 






6 


30 


8 42 


12 10 


4 10 


10 25 






6 


51 


9 05 


12 33 


4 35 


10 47 








7 45 


3 00 




" Cbambersburg 




7 


12 


9 30 


12 57 


5 05 


1108 








7 25 


12 00 


4 00 








7 


32 


9 51 


1 18 


528 


11 27 






7 


60 


10 09 


1 37 


5 48 


11 44 






8 


13 


10 31 


2 00 


6 15 


12 05 


" Mechauicsburg 




8 


39 


10 51 


2 24 


6 40 


12 26 







9 


OS 


1 00 


4 35 


725 








8 


66 


11 10 


2 42 


700 


12 45 






P. 


M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 






12 


17 


3 00 


5 47 


11 15 


4 30 






2 


33 


5 53 


8 23 


3 53 


7 33 






12 


20 


310 


6 45 


10 40 


620 






P. 


M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


1 P. M. 


A. M. 



*Daily. tDatly except Sunday. 

Additional trains will leave Carlisle ior Harrisburg daily 
except Sunday at 5.50 a. m., 7.05 a. m., 12.10 p. m., 3.45 p. m., 
an 9.40 p. m., and from Mecbanicsburg at 6.13 a. m., 7.30 
a. m., 10.00 a, m., 12.35 p. m., 1.45 p. m., 4.09 p. m., 5.35 p. m., 
and 10.05 p. m., stopping at Second St., Harrisburg, to let or! 
passengers. . .■ 

Nos. 2 and 1 run daily between Harrisburg and Hagerstown. 

Through coach from Hagerstown to Philadelphia on train 
No. 4. 



Up Trains. 



Lv. Baltimore 

" New York.. .. 
" Philadelphia.. 



" Harrisburg 

" Dillsburg 

" Mechanicsburg . 

" Carlisle 

" Newville 

" Shippensburg .... 

" Waynesboro 

" Chambersburg., 

" Mercersburg , 

" Greencastle 

" Hagerstown 

" Martinsburg 

Ar. Winchester 



fp. m. 
1150 
8 00 
11 20 

A. M. 

5 00 



No. 1 No. 3 No 5 No. 7 



5 20 

5 42 

6 05 
6 24 



6 48 



7 10 
7 33 
9 30 
10 50 
A. M. 



A.M. 

4 40 
12 15 

4 30 
A. M. 

7 53 
6 50 

8 12 
8 33 

8 58 
918 

10 18 

9 45 

11 05 
10 06 

10 35 

11 16 

12 05 
noon 



tA. M. 

" 53 



8 50 

P. M. 

12 10 

9 35 
12 30 
12 53 

1 17 

1 38 
3 00 

2 05 
5 48 
2 26 
2 50 



fA.M. 

11 40 
30 

12 25 
P. M. 

3 45 
1 20 

4 06 
4 30 

4 54 
513 
615 

5 40 



6 00 

6 30 

7 12 

8 00 
P. M. 



No. 9 

*P M. 
4 45 
200 

4 30 
P. M. 

810 

5 10 
8 30 

8 55 
918 

9 39 



10 03 



10 23 
10 50 



t Daily except Sunday. 



*Daily. 

Additional local trains will leave Harrisburg daily, except 
Sunday, for Carlisle and intermediate stations at 9.35 a. m., 
2 25 p. m., 5.20 p. m., 6.20 p. m., and 10.55 p. m., also for Me- 
cbanicsburg and intermediate, stations at 8.15 a. , m., 11.10 
a m and 3.10 p. m. All of the above trains will stop at 
Second St., Harrisburg, to take on passengers. 

Nos 3 and 9 run daily between Harrisburg and Hagerstown. 

Through coach from Philadelphia to Hagerstown on trains 
Nos. 5 snd 9. 

^oirwish to advertise anything anywhere at any time, 
write to GEO. P. ROWELL & CO., No. 10 Spruce Street, 
New York. 



T-VFKY one in need if information on the subject of ad- 
vertising will do well to obtain a copy of "Book for 
Adv^ti'e " " 368 pages, price one dollar. Mailed, postage 
mid oi ireetotof pr ice. Contains a careful compilation from 
the American Newspaper Directory of all the best papers 
nmi io.irnals gives the circulation rating of every one, 
and a goo 1 dea of in formation about rates and other matter 
pertaining to the business of advertising. Address, ROWs 
ELL'S .ADVERTISING BUREAU, 10 Spruce Street,New- 
York. 



T R. McCAULY, 

^ DAILY MEAT MARKET. 

GOOD MEAT. LOW PRICES. ANNVILLE.PA. 



FOR A FINE PHOTOGRAPH, 

CO TO 

ROSHOFS HEW GALLERY, 

121 NORTH NINTH STREET, 
LEBANON, PA. 

Extra Inducements to Students. 



16 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



^yiLLIAM KIEBLER, 

SUA VING AND HAIR DRESSING, 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop, Annville, Pa. 

M- II- SHAUD, 

DEALER IN 

Gold Watches and Jewelry, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYS- 
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S. M. SHENK'S BAKERY, 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

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One Door West Penn'a House, Ann vile. 



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— ^-V Headquarters for — 

GROCERIES, CONFECTIONERIES 

OYSTERS, FRUITS AND NUTS. 
Restaurant Attached. Meals at All Hours. 

12 West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



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FASHIONABLE TAILOR, 

18 and 30 Main St., Annville, Pa. 



DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, GRO- 
CERIES, BOOTS and SHOES, 

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35 S. White Oak Street, - - Annville, Pa. 

WILLIAM WALTZ, 
FASHIONABLE 
HAIR CUTTING AND SHAVING SALOON, 

West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
H. H. KREIDEB. J NO. E. H Kit It. 

KREIDER & CO., 
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No. 758 Cumberland St., 

LEBANON, PA. 




College Forum. 



FEBRUARY, 1896. 



• i- CONTENTS: f . 



^ Portrait, ' 17 

Va lue of the Classics in a Course of Edu- 
cation, . 17-19 

^aracter and Education, 19-21 

J Tribute to Solitude, 21 

J 1 * Beautiful, 22, 23 

Moment with Shakespeare, 23 

Italian Influence on Chaucer, .... 23-25 
^torial Staff, 25 



PAGE 

Editorials, 25, 26 

Kalozetean Literary Society, 26, 27 

Philokosmian Literary Society, 27 

Clionian Literary Society, 27 

Our Alumni, 27, 28 

Personals and Locals, 28, 29 

Exchanges, 29, 30 

College World, 30 

Advertisements, , . 31, 32 



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Please Mention "The College Forum. 



THE COLLEGE EOKUM. 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Vol. IX. No. 2. 



AXXVILLE, PA., FEBRUARY, 1896. 



Whole No. 88. 



A Portrait. 



From birth had wizard beauty followed him, 
And tendered wine from cups of golden brim. 

And he, benumbed by pleasure's poisoned air, 
Drank much and oft, because the scent was rare. 

But, ah ! what was the liquid that he quaffed ? 
Of dull conceit and pride, a hellish draught. 

On him the praise of men fell thick and fast, 
And led him oft to taste of sin's repast. 

Some years of time since then have come and 
sped; 

Remorse is with him now in beauty's stead. 

His eyes, that once were fine and filled with 
light, 

Are dimmed with darkened maze of sorrow s 
night. 

His hair, that once was all a glossy black, 
Is left a mesh of gray by ruin's rack. 

He waits for death and loves to meet the sod, 
But shrinks and fears the meeting with his God. 

Norman C. Schwchter, '97- 



Value of the Classics in a Course of 
Education. 



BY PROF. J. A. M' DERM AD, A. M. 

The great object of every consistent 
course of educational training is the ac- 
quisition and evolution of mental power. 
°ur State, as well as other States and 
countries, establishes its system of public 
^hools, not only that the young of the 
St ate shall acquire the rudiments and 
Principles of intellectual truth, but also 



that 



--- , in consonance with such acquisi- 
tion, there shall be a corresponding broad- 
J ni ng and intensifying of their intel- 
lectual faculties and perceptions. The 
aesi gn is that their education shall be 
SUc li as shall make them on the one hand 
m °re competent and efficient in their own 
yre and vocation of duty, and on the 
lher hand a mightier factor to society in 
v °rking out the problems of civilization 



and the welfare of the State. The grand 
and controlling purpose is and should be 
to secure greater and more efficient re- 
sults and advantages from the applica- 
tion of individual talent and energy. 
Again, when the State or any other or- 
ganization endows and equips colleges or 
j seminaries of higher learning, the object 
j is to lead the mind up to still greater de- 
! grees of efficiency and attainment than can 
j be secured in the lower schools. Not only 
! to know, but to do, is one of the legitimate 
! objects of every system of mental culture, 
j Whatever, therefore, enables the mind 
\ to think most clearly, reason most logic- 
i ally and determine most accurately is 
best adapted to secure the objects for 
which an education is designed. 

It is a self-evident fact that the kind 
of activity and discipline which is secured 
by any course of study, depends expressly 
upon the nature of the objects upon which 
the mind's powers are brought into ac- 
tion and its energies are elicited. The 
amount of attention, degree of enthusi- 
asm, intensity of purpose, eagerness of 
desire, and concentration of energy which 
are called forth by any subject are the 
main determining factors in deciding its 
value. The mind grows and develops 
directly by the exertion and application 
of its own energies and resources. It is 
not a passive indeterminate agency to be 
written upon or wrought upon by outside 
influences alone, but is active in its own 
purposes and regulative of its own activ- 
ity, pursuits and acquisitions ; determmg 
ing its own objects, obeying its own laws 
and directing its own progress. 

The question then arises: Are classical 
studies well calculated to awaken this in- 
terest and elicit this activity and enthu- 
siasm of the mind ? That they have such 
power we believe will become obvious by 
a number of considerations of which we 
have space to notice but one or two in 
this place. 

First, classical studies promote the 



18 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



habit of concentration of ' mind. In order 
to the securing of any phase or degree of 
mental power and efficiency, certain 
habits and modes of application and study 
must be acquired. Among these one of 
the first and most essential is that of con- 
centration. It is a universal law of all 
nature, physical, mental and spiritual, 
that concentration gives power. Com- 
press air sufficiently, and it will burst the 
mountains ; concentrate steam on the pis- 
ton of the engine, and it becomes the 
slave of commerce ; concentrate sunlight, 
and it will burn the most refractory sub- 
stances ; so concentration is that habit of 
the mind by which it gets the mastery 
over difficulties, and by which it rises to 
its true dignity, superiority and potency. 

Now, there can be no doubt in the 
mind of any one familiar with the classics 
that their study promotes this concentra- 
tion. The effort necessary in acquiring 
the mastery of the difficult and complex 
inflectional forms, the grammatical rela- 
tion of words in a sentence, as well as the 
connection of every word, thought and 
paragraph with every other portion of 
the discourse, is a work of no small value 
in its educational results. Then the exer- 
cise necessary in scanning the meaning 
and application of words in a sentence, 
and of the various definitions and shades 
of thought which belong to a word, pick- 
ing out the one which exactly applies to 
a particular case, and thus forming a 
proper conception of the meaning and 
construction of each individual part of 
the sentence and the logical import of 
the whole, is a means of discipline which 
can hardly be overestimated. 

Professor Thiersch, in speaking of the 
utility of classical training, says: "But 
those very difficulties — the mental labor 
and activity which it costs to overcome 
them — furnish to learned schools the best 
means of intellectual culture and dis- 
cipline. It is with the mind of the youth 
as it is with his body. This, as an an- 
cient writer says, cannot be trained in 
the palaestra by merely promenading 
through its groves and witnessing the 
exercises, the strength, the skill, the per- 
severance of others, nor by a mere study 
of rules. The youth must himself strug- 
gle and contend, as well as others; must 
exercise himself in running, in leaping, 
and throwing the discus and spear; must 
oppose power to power and skill to skill, 
and must call forth and exert every 



power and energy to secure success. It 
is equally true that the mind cannot be 
strengthened and disciplined by being 
conducted through the field of literature 
and entertained with its flowery attrac- 
tions, as on an excursion of pleasure. 
Let a teacher try the experiment. I^t 
a young man be taught, if he can be, to 
find pleasure in studying the Adventures 
of Telemachus or in Tasso, in the Andro- 
mache and Phaedra of the French, or the 
Clyternnestra and Merope of the Italian 
theater, or satiate his desires with the 
most elegant productions of his own liter- 
ature. It will be but a passive process of 
education, an excitement of the fancy, 
an inactive surrender to a charm, perhaps 
an ecstasy, a mere admiration of the 
glowing images that have been excited 
by the picture. But for the solid ma- 
terial of a scientific education, the disci- 
pline and gymnastic exercise of the mind, 
and consequent intellectual power, noth- 
ing will have been gained. * * * * 
This demand is met in no way so effectu- 
ally as by the earnest, thorough, well- 
directed and well-sustained study of the 
classic productions of ancient Greece 
and Rome. The very difficulties which 
the young mind has to overcome in mas- 
tering the wonderful inflections and con- 
structions of the ancient languages call 
into action its undeveloped energies more 
than any other study. The intellectual 
struggles which cannot be so great, nor 
so protracted in the study of modern 
languages, where, in order to an introduc- 
tion to their entire literature, nothing 
but grammatical difficulties are to be con- 
tended with, must in the ancient lan- 
guages be repeated in each new depart- 
ment of literature, as in passing from the 
poets to the historians, to the philosophers 
and to the orators." 

Secondly, they tend to give the learner 
a more philosophical conception of l& n ' 
guage in general than is possible without 
such studies. 

Language in its different branches and 
modifications is but a vehicle, an inter- 
mediate agency, designed to the produc- 
tion of an end that is higher and a pur' 
pose that is sublimer than the mere fact of 
language itself, namely, the revelation of 
the psychical power of man. As such, 
its philosophy rests on the philosophy ot 
mind and the laws and principles of men- 
tal development. Now, the processes an d 
operations of mental phenomena, together 



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THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



19 



Tvith the evolution and historical develop- 
ment of man's intellectual resources dur- 
ing the successive ages of time, can be 
nderstood and appreciated only by one 
ho has had an acquaintance with lan- 
guage in its historical epochs and pro- 
cesses, and especially an acquaintance with 
the languages of the most cultured nations 
of antiquity. Of these the languages of 
Greece and Rome present the genius, 
history and culture of a people of the 
highest excellence and development in 
every department of literary and political 
activity. Besides, the influence and effects 
of these ancient nations on the civiliza- 
tion of modern times, has been such that 
they have not only imparted a directing 
power on our laws, politics, science, phi- 
losophy and literature; but also they 
have had a mighty effect in giving shape, 
structure, vocabulary and consistency to 
the languages of all civilized nations of 
the present day. For this reason the study 
of those languages is best adapted to give 
to the student a philosophic knowledge 
of the general principles of linguistic 
culture. 

Hon. Hugh S. Legare says, "It is im- 
possible to contemplate the annals of 
Greek literature and art without being 
struck with them as by far the most ex- 
traordinary and brilliant phenomenon in 
the history of the human mind. The 
very language, even in its primitive sim- 
plicity as it came down from the rhapso- 
dists who celebrated the exploits of Her- 
cules and Theseus, was as great a won- 
der as any it records. All other tongues 
that civilized man has spoken are poor 
barbarous in comparison with it. 
fts compass and flexibility, its riches and 
'ts powers, are altogether unlimited. It 
not ot dy expresses with precision all that 
ls known at any particular time or pe- 
noc j, but also enlarges itself naturally 
*tth th e progress of science, and affords, 
^ " without an effort, a new phrase or a 
ystematic nomenclature whenever one is 
^ed for. It is equally adapted to every 
} n fy of style and subiect to the most 
Qadowy subtlety of distinction, and the 
t most exactness of definition, as well as 
Patho ener £ y °f P°P u l ar eloquence and 

ar\fv! rdly ' they give to the student liter " 
y Weals and models of the highest ex- 

^enM 6 '- ^ kigh ideal serves to give 
, Wal inspiration and stimulus to the 
ner - It sets before him what it is 



possible for man, under the best circum- 
stances and conditions, to achieve; and 
even if he does not measure up to his 
ideals in his own achievements, yet his 
work will likely be far better than with- 
out such models. 

Prof. Ed wards says: "The forms of 
mediaeval architecture, which shoot up 
so gracefully and in such inimitable pro- 
portions in the Netherlands, are patiently 
studied by him who would produce works 
worthy to live. So he, who would be 
drawn to the beauty of written symbols, 
who would gaze at the ' winged words ' 
of the masters of language, who would 
worthily educate his own instinctive love 
for beautiful sounds and forms, who 
would place himself under the full in- 
fluences of compositions which combine 
the freshness and simplicity of nature with 
the last polish of an art that conceals it- 
self, will repair to the pages of the 
classics. He will carefully study their 
finished sentences. He will mark the 
perfect truth of expression which can 
never grow old. He will dwell upon 
some word or phrase exquisitely chosen, 
which is a picture in itself. To these 
cherished passages, he will revert so 
fondly, that they will be forever singing 
in his ears, or be vitalized, as it were, and 
incorporated into his own being. We 
need not refer any true scholar to the 
passages which can be excelled by no 
specimens of sculptured or pictured 
beauty. The Odes of Horace, the Geor- 
gics of Vergil, the poems of Homer, the 
Dialogues of Plato, will at once recur to 
the mind. They furnish models which 
combine all the excellences of which the 
subject is capable — perfect truth to na- 
ture, sweet simplicity, most felicitous se- 
lection of epithets, a collocation of words 
which is music in itself, the repose of 
conscious power." 

Character and Education. 

Life is too short to be continually occu- 
pied with trivial affairs. There are some 
things so important that we cannot refuse 
them a fair consideration, at some time or 
other. The part that some things play 
in life convinces us that they cannot be 
slighted or despised without inestimable 
and almost irreparable loss. If we neglect 
our development, either morally or men- 
tally, or, what is still more to be deplored, 
in both, there will come a time when we 



20 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



will realize that we have missed oppor- 
tunities which would have made our 
lives what they are not, a success, both 
with regard to ourselves and others. We 
may not always be susceptible of the 
worth of these things ; they may not al- 
ways appear to us in the light of requi- 
sites for successful life or as questions 
demanding our speedy and careful atten- 
tion ; but there come times in the career 
of every one when he is brought face to 
face with the fact that his life is not what 
it should be, and that there are nobler 
aims, more glorious truths, and wider 
views of life than those which prompt his 
actions. And when these momentous 
occasions make themselves manifest, it 
behooves all not to attempt to avoid such 
good reflections, but to treasure them as 
incentives to accomplish something in 
life. 

Some great mind has said : ' ' Many 
men build as cathedrals were built ; the 
part nearest the ground finished ; but 
that part which soars towards heaven, 
the turrets and the spires, forever incom- 
plete." How significant is the thought 
contained in this quotation and yet how 
sadly true ! It is a fact, deplored by all, 
that men in striving for success will ne- 
glect the very things which, they know 
to be necessary to secure it. History 
abounds with the names of such men and 
the present age does not lack examples. 
In every age we find men who, although 
they were aware of the evils of such a 
course, followed vice in all her various 
forms ; men who, although they knew of 
the dangers and pitfalls which accompany 
wealth, sought it fiercely ; men who, al- 
though they realized its emptiness, were 
morally blinded by the seeming brilliancy 
of worldly honor. In our own age we 
see men all around us striving for an 
education and to a great extent neglect- 
ing the forming of their characters. Now, 
no one will deny the importance of a 
well-developed moral character, and yet 
how many young men in maturing them- 
selves mentally fail to make this of as 
great, if not greater importance. 

What avails it to anyone if he have 
the best education and his character is 
faulty ? He will not make as great a 
success of life as the ignorant man whose 
character is the noblest. 

Pope says: "A little learning is a dan- 
gerous thing." And it would not be in- 
appropriate to say that the best education 



unless it is enhanced by noble aims and 
moral principles will prove a snare and 
be a power only for evil. 

A noble character may exist outside 
the precincts of education, but education 
cannot beneficially exist without the up- 
lifting influences of good moral princi- 
ples. 

The good an education will do us and 
the purpose it will serve us is determined 
by our condition morally. If we cling to 
those things which are right in the sight 
of men and in the sight of God, we may 
expect our education to benefit us and 
enable us to accomplish at least a little 
towards the betterment of the world. 
But if the principles of right and wrong 
are nothing to us, if we place too great a 
value on filthy lucre, if our actions are 
governed only by public sentiment, if the 
examples of great men have no influence 
over us, then our education will only be 
a curse to ourselves and a snare to others. 

On the other hand there are many un- 
educated men whose moral standing can- 
not be questioned. In their humble lives 
they personify virtue in all forms. Yet 
to a great extent it is impossible for them 
to raise themselves out of their monoto- 
nous routine of life without the elevating 
influences of education. 

And if choice between the possession of 
education without a good character and a 
good character without education were 
necessary, the latter would seem to me to 
be the more preferable. 

With all these facts before us, is it a 
wonder that many men with all the edu- 
cational advantages desirable make a 
failure of life and that many virtuous 
men live and die forgotten. 

In this country of ours there is exist' 
ing a grand educational system. Public 
schools are spread over the country as a 
network of bulwarks against ignorance 
and all its attending evils and as a mea» 
of inculcating as early in life as V oS x 

citizens and 



m the minds of the future 
rulers of this republic the true princ 
of American freedom. Colleges and ^ 
versities are within the reach of t0 
whose vocation in life demands a . n ? a 
thorough and a more advanced train 1 »j. 
Yet this nation would make the £P*?Le 
mistake possible, if, in providing ^ % 
safeguards for its future welfare, it < s 
whole, and its citizens as i n divid u e 
would not make it of as great import ^ 
to look after the moral training oi 



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THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



21 



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future Americans. Anarcliisra, scepticism, 
fanaticism and immorality are too conta- 
gious and dangerous to the interest of a 
fiberty-loving nation without restraint. 
Rome fell because of her immorality and 
venality, and so will any nation which is 
too lax with regard to these questions. 

The pages of history, ancient and mod- 
ern, are also embellished with the names 
of men who, in their noble and exemplary 
lives, when they were drinking deep at 
wisdom's fountain, did not forget "to 
make virtue a necessity. ' ' Wisdom and un- 
derstanding when adorned and enhanced 
by a noble purity of mind, heart and soul, 
have always been revered and honored 
with merited praise. The Grecian sages 
were not only wise in their knowledge, 
but also noble and far-seeing in the pre- 
cepts and sayings which they have be- 
queathed to succeeding generations. As 
we move down through the accumulating 
ages, in every period we discover stars 
which shone brilliantly in their own day 
and which have set, leaving behind a 
radiance which shall never fade or pass 
away. Their deeds and sayings still live 
in the hearts and minds of men and will 
continue to do so throughout ages to 
come. Raymond P. Dougherty, '97. 

A Tribute to Solitude. 

Thought is the basis of civilization and 
enlightenment. Every milestone along 
tbe highway of human advancement is 
a monument to its genius. There is no 
eminence in history but is illumined with 
the radiance of its glory. The faculty of 
consecutive thinking is the seal of the 
Divine sanction of man's superiority to 
brutes— the last blessing of God to His 
hnage. Although the human intellect 
will never be able to comprehend the 
^finite, yet even the groping after light 
will ennoble the spirit and better fit it to 
a Ppreciate the perfect revelation of God 
at its union with him. To think is to live. 

Iu solitude were born our noblest 
thoughts. From the dim, shaded ave- 
nu es of seclusion have stepped forth our 
great civilizers to set forward the hand of 
{^ogress on the dial of history. Demos- 
thenes shut himself up in an underground 
CQ anvber for months, to come forth the 
leader of the world in oratory. From 
solitary communion with his God comes 
JJoses to institute laws and customs, the 
*) 0( Ms for all governments. In a lonely 
honk's cell is formed a Luther to stab to 



the heart corrupted Catholicism and her- 
ald the dawn of unrestricted religious 
thought. Solitude is the mother of our 
religions, for in it we find fostered a 
Buddha, a Mohammed, a Christ. 
"Silence and Darkness, solemn sisters, twins 
From ancient Night, who nurse the tender 
thought 

To Reasou, and on reason build resolve — 
That column of true majesty in man." 

Life is estimated by thoughts; and 
' ' he lives longest who feels the most. ' ' 
Consciousness is the foundation of knowl- 
edge ; learning, a remembering. In 
man's ability to know himself lies an 
object far nobler than the finding of any 
philosopher's stone. It too must be 
sought in solitude. Man knows most 
when he knows himself, and feels most 
when he compares himself with the In- 
finite. To study man as an animal re- 
quires society; to study him as a part of 
God demands solitude. He who studies 
mankind in society knows its unity; he 
who studies it in solitude knows its unit. 
He who thinks in society sees God as a rul- 
ing judge; he, in solitude, a father. Well 
does the soul crv as Bryant's: " O, God, 
Thou art here, Thou fillest the solitude." 

" The love of retirement," says John- 
son, "has in all ages adhered closely to 
those minds which have been most en- 
larged by knowledge and educated by 
wisdom." It is a natural tendency that 
people should select their associates and 
form their communities from those of like 
circumstances and dispositions. But the 
number of the truly great in mind and 
soul is so small that it is often necessary 
that each man be his own companions. 
In this they preserve their own individu- 
ality and forfeit nothing, for it is only 
to the guilty that to be left alone with 
conscience is torture, the pure in heart 
find self good society. 

It is in solitude that man meets God. 
To the Christian the secret closet is in- 
dispensible. The Buddhist finds seclu- 
sion a necessity for the purer knowledge 
of God and his works. Often has the 
prayer of devout individuals among all 
nations and religions been: 
"Let me to the solitudes retire; and in thy 
presence reassure my feeble virtue. 

O, God, when Thou dost scare the world with 

Be^cmnfto meditate in these calm shades 

Thy milder majesty, 
And to the beautiful order of thy works, 
Learn to conform the order of our lives 

John R. Geyer, '98. 



22 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



The Beautiful. 

One of the most perplexing subjects 
that have for many years agitated the 
minds of our philosophers, and does to 
this day, is that of Esthetics, the science 
of the beautiful. 

A science comparatively new as shown 
by the fact that it has hardly yet taken 
its position among philosophic sciences. 
Nevertheless, all admirers of taste and 
beauty cannot help but become interested 
in a subject of this nature. 

With very few exceptions all classes of 
people admire the beautiful in some form 
or other, and yet how few understand 
the term. 

Although it is one of the most familiar 
words in our vocabular)', yet the theories 
and definitions of it are as various and 
conflicting as the men who have thus far 
undertaken the discussion of the subject. 

After a thorough investigation of the 
different theories presented, it becomes 
apparent that the various writers »have 
not been true to nature. 

It is admitted that they present many 
plausible theories as to the origin and 
nature of beauty, but experience soon 
destroys them all. 

These theories, as presented by our 
philosophers, are capable of being divided 
into two classes, the subjective and the 
objective. 

Each of these divisions embraces a 
number of theories which attempt to up- 
hold their side, but sad to say unsuccess- 
fully. 

Among the theories of the subjective 
class are those of sensation, association 
and expression. 

In these three the reasoning, which is 
somewhat similar, gradually drifts to- 
gether until it is united to form the con- 
clusion that beauty is not a quality of the 
object external, but merely a feeling in 
our own minds. 

This might at first seem plausible, but 
the error is soon detected. For should it 
be true, beauty would be an emotion of 
the mind which is an absurdity. Ex- 
perience also disproves it. 

In looking upon a gorgeous sunset when 
the very heavens seem to glow with re- 
ceding splendor and the various tints of 
color gradually sink into oblivion, what is 
it that we call beautiful ? Is it the scene 
as it gradually unfolds itself to our 
minds that we call beautiful or does the 
beauty rest within the beholder ? Cer- 



tainly not in the latter, as it would ex- 
clude all those who cannot boast of any 
personal charms from enjoying like scenes 
The fact is, some of our very best artists 
are most repulsive in appearance. 

But neither does the objective theory 
meet all the requirements necessary for 
an explanation of the beautiful. Its chief 
argument is that beauty exists only in 
the external object and not in the mind. 
This, however, is again rejected, as it 
does not take into consideration the di- 
versity of effect that a beautiful object 
produces upon different people. Were 
the beauty only in the object the effect 
would be the same upon all. 

Now, in all these theories just dis- 
cussed there is something lacking and 
that something is embodied in the ac- 
cepted and correct theory of the beauti- 
ful, namely, the spiritual. 

It not only treats of beauty as existing 
in matter as such, nor in the mind alone, 
but in the expression of the higher, the 
hidden spiritual nature or element, which, 
appealing to our own spiritual nature, 
awakens our sympathy. How harmoni- 
ously the visible and invisible blend in 
this theory which is entirely wanting in 
all the others. 

Our daily experiences gives us proof of 
this. How often have we stood before a 
magnificent painting when our feelings 
were indeed hard to describe. If we en- 
tered into the spirit of the artist our very 
souls seemed to commune with the scene. 
Such an intense feeling has often been 
awakened within us that we forgot sur- 
roundings and apparently became actors 
in the scene instg ad of the inanimate be- 
fore us. What is the beautiful in this in- 
stance ? It is neither subjective nor ob- 
jective alone, although it includes both- 
For, as McCosh says, it is that invisible 
power in the object that produces the 
pleasing emotions within us that we call 
beautiful. It is only when we have these 
emotions stirred within us that anything 
can be called beautiful. Before man was 
created nothing could truly be calle" 
beautiful, for there were none to experi- 
ence those emotions which beauty excite- 
Thus in all the various kingdoms the 
beautiful is present, responding to oU 
sensibilities and appealing to the 
life of the soul. t 
In man, therefore, we have the higk^ 
type of intelligence and also the bein& 
most beautiful of all. It is the expressi 



r 

of the soul, or rather the looking out of 
v the invisible within us through the visi- 
ble, that we love and admire. How often 
have homely features been lighted up 
with a brilliant beauty when played upon 
by sympathy and a noble heart. 

Although man is a type of superior 
beauty, yet the ideal can never be fully 
represented or appreciated by us. 

For the perfection of beauty dwells 
alone in God. H. H. Heberly, '96. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



23 



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A Moment with Shakespeare. 

It has been well said, " Some men are 
born great, some achieve greatness, and 
others have greatness thrust upon them." 
But how few of us know just wherein the 
greatness of men lies. This, I believe, is 
especially true of Shakespeare. 

I shall endeavor to briefly point out a 
few of the many things that served to 
make him one of the most brilliant stars 
in the literary firmament. There are 
three special characteristics in Shakes- 
peare, three eminent and singular quali- 
ties, which more than all or anything 
else set him in a different category 
from his contemporaries. It has been 
said by Byron that there is no great poet 
who often falls below himself, and this is, 
no doubt, true, within narrow limits, of 
Shakespeare ; for I do not think it would 
be easy to find a whole scene in any of 
his acknowledged plays where his mind 
seems at dead low-tide throughout and 
to lay bare its shallows and its ooze. 

The first of the three characteristics of 
of which I shall speak is his imcompa- 
rable force and delicacy of poetic expres- 
sion, which, it seems, are impossible to 
be hidden, but which flash out from time 
to time like those pulses of flame with 
which the sky throbs at intervals. In 
a U his plays we have evidence that he 
could not long keep his mind from that 
kind of overflow. 

The second characteristic of Shakes- 
peare is his humor, in which itself and in 
quality of it he is, perhaps, more un- 
speakably' superior to his contemporaries 
than in some other directions — I mean in 
jbe power of pervading a character with 
humor— feme! yet never overstepping the 
Joiits of nature or coarsening in carica- 

. The third characteristic of Shakespeare 
s eloquence, and this, of course, we ex- 
pect to meet with, and do meet with, 



more abundantly in the historical and 
semi-historical plays than in those where 
the intrigue is more quiet and domestic. 
If I were called upon to name any one 
mark more distinctive than another of 
Shakespeare's work, it would be not mere 
oratory, as in Antony's speech over the 
body of Csesar, but an eloquence of im- 
passioned thought-finding vent in vivid 
imagery. The speeches seemed not to 
be composed, they grow ; thought bud- 
ding out of thought, and image out of 
image, by what seems a natural law of 
development, but by what is, no doubt, 
some subtler process of association in the 
speaker's mind, always gathering force 
and impetuosity as it goes on from its 
own very motion. Shakespeare showed 
his greatness in the fact that almost all 
of his contemporaries made an effort to 
follow his style at least in part. Fletch- 
er's seems artificial in comparison, but his 
fancy never sings at Heaven's gate, as 
Shakespeare so often does ; there is a 
certain dramatic passion in Shakespeare's 
versification, that passion that imbeds 
itself in the very substance of the mind. 
I believe detached verses could be cited 
from far inferior men that might well pass 
as the handiwork of the great master so 
far as their merely poetical qualities are 
concerned ; but what I mean by dramatic 
passion is that in Shakespeare's best and 
most characteristic work the very verse 
is interpenetrated by what is going on in 
the spirit of the drama, and its movement 
hastened or retarded by its emotion rather 
than by the ear and the choice of the 
poet. Let me close by saying that there 
is nothing in all literature so stimulating 
and suggestive as the thoughts he seems 
to drop as if by chance, or rather as if his 
hands were full ; nothing is so cheery as 
his humor ; he is also a great master of 
rhetoric in teaching us what to follow in 
forming a style of our own, and some- 
times quite as usefully what to avoid. 
Let us always address him in the words 
of Milton, "Sweetest Shakespeare, 
Fancy's child." 

Charles Beam Wingerd, 97. 



The Italian Influence on Chaucer. 

Literature in Italy has been in a state 
of decline for the past few centuries. But 
her early achievements m the field ot let- 
ters have influenced for the better every 
o-reat author of the ages ; and a coiitmu- 



24 



THE COLLEGE F01WM. 



ance of this influence, in various degrees 
of power, will be a certainty. One of the 
leading novels of last year, F. Marion 
Crawford's " Casa Bracio," was founded 
on Italian legends. And every year the 
land of the Tiber and the Po is thronged 
with authors seeking material for literary 
expansion. Rome will always be re- 
garded as the most powerful literary cen- 
ter the world has ever known. It is 
impossible to conceive of a greater school 
of poets than the Latin School, embracing 
such men as Horace, Juvenal and Ovid ; 
and on whom is highest honor more 
worthy to fall than on Dante, Petrarch 
and Boccaccio, the men of a later period ? 

It is our purpose to set forth, briefly, 
the influence of some of these Italian 
literary masters on the work of Geoffrey 
Chaucer, the "Father of English Poetry." 
His work is of three types : French, 
Italian and English. Of the first two the 
Italian is the more prominent, and it is 
thought by many to be in advance of his 
work of the English or native type. 

Chaucer gained his first knowledge of 
Italy by extensive travels within her 
borders. In 1373 he was associated with 
two citizens of Genoa in a commission to 
that country. In this way he acquired a 
general idea of Italian life, customs and 
religion, and an interest in her literature 
must naturally have thus been awakened 
within him. While in Genoa he became 
acquainted with the great Petrarch. Al- 
though he had but a mere taste of the 
knowledge of this man's literary methods, 
it must have proven of great literary 
benefit to him. Petrarch, who was then 
the most illustrious man of letters in Eu- 
rope, knew thoroughly every department 
of Italian literature. He could advise 
Chaucer what works to read and where 
he could obtain them. His influence on 
the Englishman was immeasurable, and 
had it not been for this association with 
so eminent a man of letters as Petrarch, 
Chaucer's poems of the Italian type 
would have been much fewer. Petrarch 
had shown him a new field, and Chaucer 
has ably worked therein. 

A citation of the most important of our 
author's productions, for which his 
knowledge of Italian letters served as a 
model, seems to be in order here. Among 
his minor poems the House of Fame, 
Legend of Good Women and Troilus and 
Creseide bear the distinctive Italian 
stamp. 



The first of these works shows the in- 
fluence of Chaucer's general insight into 
Italian style ; but the remaining ones are 
directly traceable to well-ordered pieces of 
Italian literature. The Legend of Good 
Women has been found by the critics to 
be a close translation from Ovid, but it 
bears a fine shade of Chaucerian origi- 
nality in its coloring. The fact that the 
Prolog to the poem is the finest part of 
the work proves that Chaucer was capa- 
ble of doing much in an original way, 
His Troilus and Creseide was drawn 
largely from a work of Boccaccio. The 
story was a popular one in the Middle 
Ages and common in Chaucer's time, 
and the new dress with which he adorned 
it considerably lengthened the days of its 
popularity. In many passages we find 
that Chaucer closely adhered to the origi- 
nal text ; but says Shaw : "In the con- 
duct of the story, in the development of 
ideal characters and in a delicate appre- 
ciation of moral sentiment, he was far 
superior to his Italian contemporary." 
Chaucer did a delightful thing in this 
poem by making use of the extremely 
musical Italian stanza, thus strengthen- 
ing its mechanical effect. The story of 
Troilus and Creseide also pleased Shakes- 
peare in his day, and he honored it with 
a dramatization. 

About the only prose work of impor- 
tance that Chaucer ever did was a transla- 
tion of a prominent piece of Italian litera- 
ture : Bcethius's De Consolatione . 

His last and greatest work, the Canter- 
bury Tales, considered as his mp st 
original work, also bears a heavy imprint 
of Italian influence. Many of its most 
brilliant passages are due to the author s 
researches among the well-stocked de- 
partments of the early Latin literature. 
The most prominent of the tales taken 
from Italian authors are : the Knight s 
Tale, which was borrowed, without r e ' 
serve, from the Theseida, of Boccaccio; 
and the story of Patient Griselda, told by 
the Clerk of Oxford, came from Petrarch s 
translation of the last tale in Boccaccio s 
Decameron. Other early Italian write 15 
furnished many of the stories. 

"The general plan of the work," sa ? 
Shaw, "is believed to have been take^ 
from the Decameron, of Boccaccio, th°^», 
the English poet's conception and nieth° 
are superior to that of the Italian, wh° s . 
ten accomplished young gentlemen 
ladies assemble in their luxurious vill a 



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THE COLLEGE FORUM. 25 



escape from the terrible plague which is 
devastating Florence." 

Thus we see that Chaucer is deeply in- 
debted to Italian authorship for the best 
of his poetical productions. He lacked 
inventive genius, and since his own coun- 
try could furnish him with few models to 
follow, we should rejoice that he turned 
his attention to a literature so vast and 
so rich in matter and method as the 
Italian. J- R - H - 

EDITORIAL STAFF. 

THE COLLEGE FOUUJl is published monthly through- 
out the college year by the Philokosmian Society of Leba- 
non Valley College. 

H. CLAY DKANEH, 79, Editor-in-Chief. 



ASSISTANT EDITORS. 

H. H. Heberly, '96. Ira E. Albert, '97. 

N. 0. SCHLICHTER, '97. .1 ACOB ZERBE, '98. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
H. Clay Deaner, '79, Publisher. 
W. G. Clippinger, '98, Business Manager. 
C.H. Sleichter, '96, Assistant Business Manager. 



Terms: Twenty-flTe cents a year, Ave cents per copy. 

THE COLLEGE FORUJl will be forwarded to all sub- 
seribers until an order is recei?ed for its discontinuance, 
«nd until all arrearages have been paid. 

Address all business communications to W. G. 
Clippinger, Annville, Pa. 

Address all communications for publication, ex- 
changes, etc., to Box 776, Annville, Pa. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as 
second-class mail matter. 



Editorial. 



With this, the second issue, we are 
f airly started in Vol. IX. Our recent call 
for contributions has so far brought very 
tittle voluntary matter to the editors and 
We deem it advisable to repeat it. If you 
We a good poem, essay or story, let your 
College paper have it. The success of our 
P a Per, in a literary way, is just what you 
ma ^e it, fellow-students, and if you would 
eac h realize this as the editorial board 
^s, we feel sure that you would act at 
° Uce in this matter. We trust that this 
Wl U be the last time that we must remind 
y ° u that your editors need your assist- 
ance. 



present this month to our readers 
a thoughtful article from the pen of Prof. 
JA - McDermad on the "Value of the 



Classics." We call the special attention 
of the students to this article. The other 
writers are Messrs. Geyer, Dougherty, 
Heberly, Wingerd and " J. R. H." Next 
month's issue will contain an article by 
Professor Good, a purely literary poem : 
Houri Song of Welcome, and other 
things of interest. 



With this month's issue Mr. Clip- 
pinger assumes control of the business de- 
partment of the Forum. We earnestly 
request the students to give him your 
support in his work. You can help him 
by subscribing for the Forum and by 
patronizing our advertisers. If you buy 
anything of a dealer who advertizes in our 
columns, tell him where you saw his ad., 
and he will feel like renewing his patron- 
age with us. We need subscribers. Stu- 
dents keep this in mind and help us to 
get them. ^ 

IT is by no means too early in the sea- 
son to turn our thoughts to the baseball 
interests of our institution. Last year 
our failure to act in this matter at the 
proper time resulted in a short season and 
an inferior team. This dare not be the 
case in the coming months. While we 
sorely feel the need of a permanent ath- 
letic association, let us not fail to do our 
best under our present conditions. We 
hope to see a meeting of the student body 
at an early date which shall elect a good 
captain and manager and also devise 
some plans for raising money to aid the 
manager in his work. Let us aim at hav- 
ing a good baseball team this year and 
see that we reach our aim. 



What our College needs is to be better 
advertised among the United Brethren. 
Our representative musical organization, 
the College Male Quartet, is very able to 
do this. Pastors and young peoples' so- 
cieties in our churches should make an 
effort to have concerts in their churches 



2(5 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



and thus help to advertise our institu- 
tion. For easy terms and programs ad- 
dress the Quartet, Box 776, Annville, 
Pa. We promise all a rare entertain- 
ment who secure the Lebanon Valley 
College Male Quartet. 

We are glad to note the increase of in- 
terest in the reading room that is being 
manifested at the outset of the term. 
This is an evidence that our students are 
not trying to be merely "book worms," 
but are seeking that broader knowledge 
that shall enlighten along the lines of 
modern progress, religiously, scientifically 
and socially. There are still a few, how- 
ever, who annoy the readers with boister- 
ous talking and laughing and in other 
disrespectful ways. We trust the stu- 
dents who are guilty of this offense will 
see themselves as well-bred students see 
them, and try to reform their conduct in 
the reading room. 



The special session of the College 
Board of Trustees held on the second 
day of January was well attended, and 
its proceedings characterized with un- 
usual interest. The financial condition 
of the College was the all-absorbing topic, 
and measures were adopted looking to- 
ward the early cancellation of the entire 
indebtedness and the appointing of an 
efficient agent to take the field at once. 

No interest in the Church merits more 
hearty support on the part of all our 
own people than the cause of higher edu- 
cation, and the custodians of this cause, 
we are glad to know, realize this fact, 
and the additional fact also that unless 
something decisive is done the cause will 
suffer, and with it the entire Church in 
the East. 

■» ♦ • 

We noticed in the college paper of a 
leading institution recently a startling 
editorial on the use of the cigarette among 
its students. A warning note was sounded 



for every inhaler of the poisoned tobacco 
and awful testimonies of the school's 
physicians, as to the deadly effect of the 
cigarette on the mental powers of its 
users, were given. We are glad to see 
that the college journals are also aiding 
in the cigarette reform, for they will cer- 
tainly reach a class of cigarette users that 
other papers would not. While smoking 
is not carried on to any great extent 
among our students, yet to those who do 
use tobacco, and, especially the cigarette, 
we would say, stop at once. It is a truth 
that the habit can be stopped and it is a 
truth that tobacco is harmful to man. If 
we are reasonable with ourselves surely 
we will try to conquer the habit at once. 



Kalozetean Literary Society. 



Palma Non Sine Pulvere. 



Howard E. Ende;rs, Editor. 



The Kalos have all returned and their 
beaming faces indicate that they have 
come to take a more active part in the 
Society work assigned them than during 
1895, an d we hope they may succeed. 

There are fellow students among us who 
as yet have joined no Society. Why not 
enter your name to one of the literary 
bodies and promote its interest as well as 
your own. We all know that literary ex- 
cellence is gained only by close applica- 
tion and study, and a good society witn 
its library affords us the privilege of be- 
coming thorough students. 

Honor is due to the following persons, 
for so kindly donating the following books 
to the Society: Rev. D. E. Burton, "Cop/ 
of 1623 folio edition of Shakepeares 
Works," P. F. Collier, New York, "Capi- 
tals of the Globe," W. J. Shuey, Daltofl; 
Ohio, "Studies in Mosaic Institutions, 
and O. H. Oldroyd, Washington, D- u 
" Words of Lincoln." ^ 

Kindly accept our sincere thanks for 
kindly remembering the Kalozetean t> 
ciety. We grateful acknowledge the 
as books to supply a great need in ^ a 
various lines, and we claim theni a s 
valuable addition to our library. &c . 

Rev. David Buddinger, '99. uaS ^ 
cepted a charge in Middleburg, P a " 



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THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



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therefore was obliged to leave the Society 
work and quit College. Mr. Buddinger 
jj as been characterized as one of our most 
enthusiastic workers during the two 
years, while in connection with the So- 
ciety.' We were sorry to lose so active 
a member, but since unavoidable, we 
wish success may crown his efforts. 

John Stehman, '99, returned to College 
w ith a fine bicycle — a Christmas present. 



Philokosmian Literary Society. 



Esse Quam Videri. 



R. P. Dougherty, Editor. 



The P. L. S. celebrated its first meet- 
ing in the winter term on Friday even- 
ing, January 10th, by having a grand 
spelling match. This, while it may seem 
to some out of place and unnecessary, 
was an occasion of much joviality and 
good will among the members and one 
which called forth to the utmost their 
ability in spelling words of every-day use. 
At any rate every one expressed himself 
pleased with it and we feel sure that 
every one who took part in it was bene- 
fited, inasmuch as he learned to spell a 
few more words and realized that he 
could to a great degree augment his pro- 
ficiency in this important common branch 
of study. 

like to urge our members 
the concert on February 
New York Male Quartet. 
£~ ^v.ia lc Committee needs you to 
talp them, both by going yourselves and 
V persuading others to do likewise. 

The joint session of our Society with 
we Clionian, on January 24th, was an 
^qualified success. We will give a full 
ac count in our column next month. 
In the failure of Mr. Beattie, '98, to re- 
Ur n to College this term, the P. L. S- 
Jses a very valuable member. We wish 
every possible success in whatever 
may undertake and hope that he may 
e a gain among our number ere long. 



Clionian Literary Society. 



We would 
not to forget 
21st, by the 
The Lecture 



ago dear old Dr. Witherspoon 




J a s wont "thus to addiess the Princeton 
J . nien : " Gentlemen, if you have not 
. f arning ) this university is the fountain ; 
.you lack piety, you know where it may 
obtained; but if you lack common 
Se » may heaven have mercy on you." 



Virtute et fide. 



Eixa. N. Black, Editor. 



Miss Regennas, of Lancaster, has been 
the guest of Miss Trabert during the 
month. She became thoroughly ac- 
quainted with the College and hopes to 
enter as a student next term. 

Mrs. Reno Harp, an ex-member, has 
been visiting her mother in town recently. 
She now resides in Frederick, Md. 

Miss Pearl Kephart and Lillie Kreider 
are new names on the Society register. 
We most heartily welcome these new T - 
comers. 

The new officers are : President, Stella 
Stehman, '96; Vice-President, Blanche 
Kephart, '98 ; Recording Secretary, Mary 
Kreider, '99; Corresponding Secretary, 
Katharine Mumma; Treasurer, Bessie 
Kinports, '99; Critic, Ella Black, '96, and 
Pianist, Bertha Mayer, '96. 



Our Alumni. 

'86. Rev. D. B. Burtner, of Boyles- 
ton Centre, Mass., is now remodeling his 
church. Mr. Burtner is well known as a 
progressive minister. 

'89. Reno S. Harp, the attorney of 
Frederick, Md., was in our town during 
the month visiting his father-in-law, S. L. 
Brightbill. He made several calls at the 
College. 

' 9 o & Rev. J. T. Spangler, of Hagers- 
town, Md., received a handsome gold 
watch as a Xmas present from his con- 
gregation. His family was also comfort- 
ably remembered. 

'90. Edward S. Bowman, pastor of 
the U. B. Church, of Mechanisburg, con- 
tinues to publish his bright church local, 
the Reflector. The January number is 
devoted to revival work, and will un- 
doubtedly be of much help to Rev. Mr. 
Bowman's parishioners and others. 

'91 John W. Owen, pastor of Our 
Church,' at Walkersville, Md., recently 
paid a visit to the pastorate of Rev. 
Washinger, '91. at Chambersburg ren- 
dering him valuable service m his re- 
vival meetings. His sermons were most 
favorably commented upon by the Cham- 
bersburg " dailies." . 

'92. Seba C. Huber, principal of the 
schools of Tama, Iowa, expects to be ad- 



28 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



mitted to the bar in a very short while. 
We will be glad to call him Esquire. 

'92. Lulu M. Baker, musical graduate, 
now in Otterbein University, contributed 
a valuable article recently to the Univer- 
sity monthly, the Aegis. 

'93. Horace Crider spent a few days 
in town, during the past month, visiting 
his, cousin William H. Kreider, '94, of 
Yale. 

'94. G. A. L. Kindt, now of Ohio 
University, Athens, called on friends here 
a short time ago. This was George's first 
visit to College since his graduation. 

'94. George A. L,. Kindt, who spent 
the past year at the Ohio State Univer- 
sity pursuing post-graduate work in 
chemistry, was recently elected to a po- 
sition in Western Normal College and 
Commercial Institute, at Bushnell, 111. 
He has accepted and assumed the duties 
of the position two weeks ago. 

'95- Joji Kingori Irie reached his na- 
tive country, Japan, in safety on the 13th 
day of November. He, with the assist- 
ance of Dr Bell, our general missionary 
secretary, is now busily engaged organiz- 
ing mission work in the city of Tokio. 

'95. Jacob H. Reber has resigned his 
position in a Waynesboro' school to take 
the principalship of a school in Hunting- 
don, Pa. We wish him success in his 
new field. Jacob fully deserves all he 
gets. 



Personals and Locals. 

The latest law question : Is it legal for 
a man to marry his widow's sister? 

Norman — "Yes, mother, when I grad- 
uate, I intend following a literar)' career 
— write for money, }^ou know." 

Mother — "Why, Norman, my dear, 
you haven't done anything else since 
you've been at college." 

The postmasters are no doubt very 
much relieved that the Christmas Holi- 
days are over, as the mails have been ex- 
tremely heavy. Some of the blame, I am 
afraid, rests upon some of our students. 

Prof. McDermad was visited on Janu- 
ary nth, by two young men from Dallas- 
town, Pa., who intend entering College 
next term. 

Wingred,'97, preached for Rev. Rhodes, 
of Lebanon, on January 10th, and Clip- 
pinger, '98, filled his home puplit very 
acceptably during the holiday vacation. 
Both these gentlemen received license to 



preach as a Christmas gift from their Pre- 
siding Elder, Rev. Anthony. 

"Hicky," '99, broke through the ice 
while skating on Herr's ice dam a few 
weeks ago. Hertzog, '99, rescued him, 
for which act of kindness Myers has 
promised to build him a monument. 

Schlichter, '97, declares emphatically 
that a certain Roman had two sons and 
they were brothers. 

A new poet has recently been born 
among the Junior Hills. His book is 
now for sale at 3^3 (?) a copy. Call for 
it at the Dock. We append a sample of 
its contents: 

Light delights 
To be out at nights ; 
Next day he sleeps, 
Zeros he reaps. 

The deep theology 
Of Boyer's "biology" 
Is always at best 
When he is at rest. 

When you have solved 
The problem involved, 
Then go up higher, 
Said "Red" to Geyer. 

Zerbe's gloom, 
His awful doom ; 
Dark is his life 
Since she is wife. 

SONG OF A REJECTED LOVER, GOING HOME 

AFTER A SHOWER. 
The road is short, but dark and smeary, 
It rains and the night is far from cheery ; 
The mud still clings to the lagging boots, 
The screech owl faint in the distance hoots, 
And the road is dark and smeary. 

My life is short, but dark and smeary, 
It rains, and my life is. far from cheery; 
My thoughts still cling to my lagging hopes, 
Me she refuses and then elopes. 
Oh ! my life is dark and smeary. 

Cease now, vain heart, thy sad lamenting. 
There is one to thee that's now assenting; 
Thy lot is the common share of all, 
Some hearts' love in vain does call; 
Some roads must be dark and smeary. 

Remember the date of the concert by 
the N. Y. Male Quartet in the College 
Chapel, February 21st, Friday Evening' 
You will want to hear Douglass L a " e 
the peerless bass, and Miss Nicols, 
charming reader. Admission, 50 cents. 

The trustees of the college met in spf 
ial session a few days during vaca ti • 
A large majority of the board was P 
ent and some definite action was take 11 
the speedy bettering of our i 

nstitution- 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



•2!i 



Albert, 97, pastor of our church at 
Sinking Springs, had a good revival 
meeting recently. 

Miss Allis, the preceptress, spent a 
short part of her recent vacation visiting 
friends in Chambersburg and Mechanics- 
burg. Mechanicsburg had particular at- 
tractions for her, since it is the seat of 
Irving College, with which her sister was 
intimately connected for a number of years 
as professor. 

Several other members of the faculty 
were away during vacation. Miss Flint 
visited Miss Mary Sleichter, in , Harris- 
burg ; Prof. Deaner spent a few days in 
Maryland, and Prof. Good was at his home 
in Progress, Pa. 

Beattie, '98, has not returned to college 
this term. We are sorry to lose Will, who 
occupied a leading position with the L. 
V. C. male quartet. 

Mr. Byron Sheesly, of Progress, has 
entered College, and Messrs. Henry and 
Haines are now boarders. 

The Executive Committee of the Col- 
lege met in the President's office on the 
13th ult. , for a business session 

Billy narrowly escaped losing his dear 
old pipe while out skating last month. 
It fell into the water and was only re- 
gained after some exertion. 

The L. V. C. Quartet is the same 
this year again with one exception. Prof, 
lehman will sing 1st tenor in the place 
of Beattie, '98, who has not returned to 
College this term. 

Miss Flora Maysilles, who was a stu- 
dent here two years ago, has been granted 
Quarterly Conference license to preach 
the Gospel. Miss Maysilles contemplates 
entering College again in the spring. 

The reception held at the Ladies' Hall 
°n the nth ult. was greatly enjoyed by 
aJ l present, and the social committee de- 
serve credit for their skillful preparations. 
One thing lacking was more boys, they 
b eing completely outnumbered by the 
pris, due perhaps to the fact that it is 
leap year. Nevertheless a great interest 
taken in the various social games in- 
educed, and the time for leaving came 
0nl y too soon. Light refreshments were 
served before the grand march, which 
en <led the exercises for the evening. 
Questions to be answered : 
Why does Baer keep shy of the water 
^orks ? 



What became of Clippinger's Whiskers? 

Why don't Win gerd. come to breakfast 
Sunday mornings? 

Why can Sheridan do without a lamp ? 

Which one of our boys might be called 
"Boaz?" 

Why does Walter become sad when a 
visitor from Carlisle is announced ? 

Why does Miss F — fear a gun ? 

What is Miss R — 's '97 favorite color? 

Who said Jove was the wife of Jupiter ? 

Prof. J. A. McDermad delivered a 
highly instructive lecture on the ' ' Place 
of Greece in History," before his Greek 
History class shortly before the close of 
last term. This is but one of the many 
ways in which he manifests his progres- 
sive spirit. 

On January 17th Rev. Geo. Thos. 
Dowling, of Boston, delivered his famous 
lecture on ' ' Bringing up a parent in the 
way he should go," before the students 
and friends of the College. The Doctor 
made many friends here and he clearly 
demonstrated that he well merits his 
success on the platform. 



Exchanges. 

A great many college journals pub- 
lished their usual special Christmas issues. 
New covers, illustrations and the like 
were in abundance. As far as we are 
able to judge, these various souvenir num- 
bers surpassed those of former years in 
every way. As for ourselves we have 
been unable to do anything in this way 
and have had to meet the Holidays with 
our usual quietude. Football summaries 
were also prominent and many of them 
were accompanied with very handsome 
engravings. We heartily congratulate 
the various editors who had these 
" specials " in charge. _ 

The Nemosynean is right in cautioning 
us to beware of publishing much of the 
so-called wit of college journals. This cau- 
tion is in answer to an editorial which 
recently found its way into our columns 
and which called for more humor to en- 
liven our seeming dullness. We trust all 
our exchange readers will regard this call 
as being made for nothing but the purest 
kind of wit or humor. If our editorial 
should be in any way a boom to the jour- 
nals who publish those light and bois- 
trously "funny things " we regret its 
publication. We agree with the Nemo- 
synean when it says that "instead of pro- 
t 



30 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



during the healthful laugh, this so- 
called wit can conjure up only a sickly 
smile." 

The Otterbein Aegis for December is 
particularly readable. The ' ' Football 
Aftermath ' ' is made very attractive by 
being illustrated with five good half-tones. 
The editorials are also spirited. We like 
the ring of one of them which says, ' ' Col- 
lege spirit is that manly and admirable 
spirit which booms and arouses your col- 
lege, your football, baseball and athletic 
clubs, which puts new life in yourself 
and all with whom you come in contact, 
and not that slinking, contemptible dis- 
position which destroys property, as- 
saults your fellow student or subjects to 
the deepest humiliation your closest friend, 
or perchance an unfortunate enemy." 

The Washington Jeffersonian closed the 
year 1895 with one of the best souvenir 
numbers that ever entered our sanctum. 
The illustrations were of a high order, 
the double-page cut of the Glee Club 
easily leading in attractiveness. The 
article on ' ' College Days of James G. 
Blaine," by his classmate, J. G. Jacob, 
brings to light the youth of our dead 
statesman in a very delightful way. ' ' As 
to his social qualities," says Mr. Jacob, 
Blaine was generally liked by his mates. 
" He was not specially social, neither was 
he at all repellant; was rather unobtru- 
sive and disposed to mind his own busi- 
ness, and yet not offish, offensively or 
unsympathetic. He took little part in 
the games on the campus, never figured 
as an athlete in any way, nor was he, so 
far as we remember, ever engaged in any 
college broil or disturbance of any kind. 
He was not a drinker. And yet he was 
not a dude, or a goody-goody, by any 
means." 

The December, '95, issue of the Em- 
erson College Magazine presents a strong 
list of authors, including T. B. Aldrich, 
Sir Henry Irving and W. J. Rolfe. Mr. 
Rolfe writes on the ' ' Baconian Lunacy, ' ' 
a subject of which he probably knows 
more than any man in America. Henry 
Irving speaks of the " Character of Mac- 
beth " and closes with these lines: " Let 
it be sufficient that Macbeth, hypocrite, 
murderer, traitor, regicide, threw over his 
many crimes the glamor of his own 
poetic, self-torturing thought. He was a 
Celt in every phase of his life; his Celtic 
fervor was manifest. It is not needed 
that we, who are students in our various 



ways of an author's meaning, should 
make so little of him as to lose his main 
purpose in the misty beauty of his poetic 
words. ' ' 

The Christmas St. Joseph Collegian was 
in many respects a fiction number, and as it 
contained three stories, of good quality, I 
might also note it. We are sorry that we 
cannot rejoice with the Collegia?i when it 
says, "the alacrity with which the stu- 
dents responded to the call for literary 
contributions to our paper is very com- 
mendable." It has always been a trouble 
with us to get our students to send in 
contributions and we are in a position to 
congratulate this most excellent exchange 
on the freedom of its editors from the 
above named vexation. Several good 
pictures also helped to make the paper of 
much interest to its readers. 

It is rumored that The Dickinsonian 
will soon become a "bi-weekly." This 
would be a big step, but we believe this 
very much prized exchange of ours is able 
to take it. The editorial on "In Memo- 
riam," in this paper for December was 
notably exhaustive. Several other strong 
editorials accompanied it. 

The " Woman's Edition ' ' of the Buck- 
nell Mirrow was the last thing to reach 
us before going to press. The edition, 
which is one of the novelties in the col- 
lege world, contains much of merit. The 
sketch, "Waiting," is a clever piece of 
work. Of the poems, four or five, Miss 
Hanna's translation of Schiller's "The 
Knight of Toggenburg" easily stands 
preeminent. The exchange column is 
not up to the ideal by quite a stretch. K 
contains very little belonging to the well- 
ordered exchange department. 



College World. 

The fraternities at Dartmouth have 
drawn up resolutions in which they agree 
not to pledge or say anything about fra- 
ternities to new men before November 
20th of each year. , 

Col. John A. Woodward, of Howard, 
has been appointed by the Pennsylvania 
State College as superintendent of » 
Chatauqua course in agriculture, an 
will enter upon the duties of his posits 
within a few days. 

The instructional force of the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin this year numbers i4j 
persons, of whom 73 are professors a 
41 instructors and assistants. 




THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



81 



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TIME TABLE— May 20, 1895. 



Down Trains. 



Lv. Winchester 

" Martinsburg . ... 

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Ar. Dillsburg , 

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Philadelphia.. 

New York 

Baltimore.. ... 



No. 2 No. 4 No. 6 No. 8 No.10 



6 30 
6 51 



7 12 



7 32 

7 50 

8 13 

8 39 

9 05 
8 56 

P. M. 
12 17 
2 33 
12 20 
P. M. 



tA.M. 

7 15 

8 00 

8 42 

9 05 
7 45 
9 30 
7 25 
9 51 

10 09 
10 31 

10 51 
1 00 

11 10 
P. M. 

3 00 
5 53 
3 10 
P. M. 



fP.M. 



1210 
12 33 



12 57 
12 00 
1 18 

1 37 
200 
224 

4 35 

2 42 
P. M. 

5 47 
8 23 

6 45 
P. M. 



|P. M. 

2 30 

3 20 
410 

4 35 

3 00 

5 05 

4 00 
528 

5 48 

6 15 

6 40 

7 25 
700 

P. M. 
11 15 
3 53 
10 40 
P. M. 



*P.M. 

5 15 

6 43 
10 25 
10 47 



11 ( 



1127 

11 44 

12 05 
12 26 



12 45 
A. M. 

4 30 
733 
6 20 

A. M. 



*Daily. tDaily except Sunday. 

Additional trains will leave Carlisle for Harrisburg daily 
except Sunday at 5.50 a. m., 7.05 a. m., 12.10 p. m., 3.45 p. m., 
an 9.40 p. m., and from Mechaniesburg at 6.13 a. m., 7.30 
a. m., 10.00 a, m., 12.35 p. m., 1.45 p. m., 4.09 p. m., 5.35 p. m., 
and 10.05 p. m., stopping at Second St., Harrisburg, to let off 
passengers. 

Nos. 2 and 1 run daily between Harrisburg and Hagerstown. 
Through coach from Hagerstown to Philadelphia on train 
No. 4. 



Up Trains. 



IiV. Baltimore 

" New York .. .. 
" Philadelphia.. 



No. 1 No. 3 No. 5 No. 7 



" Harrisburg 

" Dillsburg 

" Mechaniesburg . 

" Carlisle 

" Newville 

" Shippensburg.... 

" Waynesboro 

' ' Chambersburg . . 

" Mercersburg 

" Greencastle 

" Hagerstown 

" Martinsburg 

Ar. Winchester 



tP. m. 

1150 
8 00 
11 20 

A. M. 

5 00 



5 20 

5 42 

6 05 
6 24 



6 48 



7 10 
7 33 
9 30 
10 50 
A. M. 



4 40 
12 15 

4 30 
A. M. 



tA. M. 

8 53 



53 
6 50 
8 12 
8 33 

8 58 

9 18 

10 18 
9 45 

11 05 
10 06 

10 35 

11 16 .... 

12 05 .... 
noon p. 



8 50 
P. M. 
12 10 

9 35 
12 30 
12 53 

1 17 

1 38 
3 00 

2 05 
5 48 
2 26 
2 50 



tA.M. 
11 40 
30 
VI 25 
P. M. 

3 45 
1 20 

4 06 
4 30 

4 54 
513 
6 15 

5 40 



6 00 

6 30 

7 12 
800 

P. M. 



No. 9 



*P M. 
4 45 
200 
4 30 
P. M. 
810 
510 
8 30 

8 55 
918 

9 39 



10 23 
10 50 



*Daily. fDaily except Sunday. 

Additional local trains will leave Harrisburg daily, except 
Sunday, for Carlisle and intermediate stations at 9.35 a. m., 
2.25 p. m., 5.20 p. m., 6.20 p. m., and 10.55 p. m., also for Me- 
chaniesburg and intermediate, stations at 8.15 a. m., 11.10 
a. m., and 3.10 p. m. All of the above trains will stop at 
Second St., Harrisburg, to take on passengers. 

Nos. 3 and 9 run daily between Harrisburg and Hagerstown. 

Through coach from Philadelphia to Hagerstown on trains 
Nos. 5 snd 9. 



TF vou wish to advertise anything anywhere at any time, 
J- write to GEO. P. HOWELL & CO., No. 10 Spruce Street, 
New York. 



TTVEKV one in need ->f information on the subject of ad- 
& vertising will do well to obtain a copy of "Book for 
Advertisers " 368 pages, price one dollar. Mailed, postage 
mid on weiptof price. Contains a careful compilation from 
the AmeiMcan Newspaper Directory of all. the best papers 
•uid class journals; gives the circulation rating of every one, 
and a goo I deal of information about rates and other matter 
nertaimng to the business of advertising. Address, ROWs 
ELL^S ADVERTISING BUREAU, 10 Spruce Street, New- 
York. 



J, 



R. McCAULY, 



DAILY MEAT MARKET. 

GOOD MEAT. LOW PRICES. ANNVILLE.PA. 



FOR A FINE PHOTOGRAPH, 

GO TO 

ROSHOFS FEW GALLERY, 

121 NORTH NINTH STREET, 
LEBANON. PA. 

Extra Inducements to Students. 



32 



^TILLIAM KIEBLER, 
SUA VING AND H AIR DRESSING, 

Eagle Hote] Barber Shop, Aimville, Pa. 

M. H. SHAUD, 

DBALKR IN 

Gold Watches and Jewelry, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYS- 
ANRTIZILLE, PA. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 

If you want to Buy a Hat rigbt, and a right Hat, or anj 
Men's Furnishings, 



TKKS AND CREAM. 



S. M. SHENK'S BAKERY, 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

FRESH BREAD, CAKES AND ROLLS, 

One Door West Henn'a House, Annvlle. 



S. 23. T7\7\A.GWSri33=L, 

— ^-r Headquarters For -<^*~— 

GROCERIES, CONFECTIONERIES 

OYSTERS, FRUITS AND NUTS. 
Restaurant Attached. Meals at All Hours. 

12 West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
JACOB SARGENT, 
J FASHIONABLE TAILOR, 

18 and 20 31 a in St., Annville, Fa. 



DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, GRO- 
CERIES, BOOTS and SHOES, 

—AND— 

GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS. 

J". S». SHOPE, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

SNOW FLAKE PRINTING HOUSE, 
A. C. M. HEISTER, Prop., 
FINE JOB PRINTING, 

35 S. White Oak Street, - - Annville, Pa. 



WILLIAM WALTZ, 
FASHIONABLE 
HAIR CUTTING AND SHAVING SALOON, 

West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
H. H. KREIDEU. JNO. K. HERB. 

KREIDER & CO., 
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OP 

Hard & Soft Coal, Grain, Seeds Salt & Feed. 

Office: Railroad Street, near Depot, 
Telephone Connection. ANNVILLE, PA. 

THE BEST STOCK, THE LOWEST 
PRICES IN 

FURNITURE , j s e ph a mTlle r • s 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

F. W. FROST, 
BOOK BINDER AND BLANK BOOK 
MANUFACTURER, 

783 Cumberland St., - - Lebanon, Pa. 



Successors to RAITT & CO., 
Eighth and Cumberland Sts., Lebanon, 

Kinports & SlienJ 

ANNVILLE, PA., 

Dealers in Dry Goods, 

and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home-ma^ 
Ingrain and Brussels Carpets. You buy Cheaper 
from us than away from home, and have alargi 
stock to select from. 



EC. A. LOSER, 

GROCERIES AND CONFECTR 

OYSTERS AND ICE CREAM, 

annville:, fa. 



CHARLES FOSTER PUBLISHING CO. 

716 SANSOM ST., PHILADELPHIA) ? 



DESIGNING. 



WOOD ENGRAVING. 



PHOTO-ENGRAVING. 

Pennsylvania Engraving Co. 

114 to 180 S. 7th Street, PHILADELPHIA. 
COLLEGE WORK A SPECIALTY. 



A. C. ZIMMERMAN, 



DEALER IN 



Carpels, Rugs and Oil 61 

No. 758 Cumberland St.* 



LEBANON, PA. 



Volume IX. 



Number 3. 



SB, 



on, \ 



tit 



le-madt 



THE 



College FoRun 



-j 

ffl 



7L 



o. 



AVING 



Co. 



IIA. 



nARCH, 1896. 



. .f CONTENTS: f • 



Bouri Song of Welcome 33 Editorials 

Music 33-35 

My Dream ^ 36 

Impressions of the University Extension 

Summer Meeting 36-38 

Marcella Again 3& ~ 40 

The Book of the Centuries 40, 41 

Editorial Staff 41 



PAGE 

41-43 

Our Alumni 43 

Philokosmian Literary Society 43 

Clionian Literary Society 43 > 44 

Personals and Locals ^' I« 

Senior Rhetorical • -™ 

Advertisements 46-48 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



HARRY LIGHT, 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 



22 EAST MAIN ST., ANNVILLE, PA. 



Our shelves are constantly filled with 
New, Second- Hand and Shelf-Worn 



ll 



O 

) 3 



Together with a Complete Assortment of 

§ STATIONERY, 



3 



w 



Wall Paper and Window Shades, a 

H 

A Selected Stock of the 1 - 

00 

LATEST STYLES OF jfifALL PAPER § 

AND Cfl 

DECORATIONS. 



SCHOOL AND COLLEGE TEXT-BOOKS A SPECIALTY. 



E. E. GHOSH, 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 



INCLUDING 
NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 
OLD BOOKS. NEW BOOKS. 

Cheapest place In the Lebanon Valley to buy your 
Books. 43g- New and Old Books Bought, 
Sold and Exchanged. 

ISAAC WOLF, 

s 



ONE PRICE ONLY . 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 
828 CUMBERLAND STREET. 



Rensselaer \ 
^Polytechnic^ 
Institute, 



Of 

'9 



Troy, N.Y. 

Local examinations provided for. Send for a Catalogue, 



» 
» 
* 
* 

* 
* 

* 
ft 
ft 
* 

» 
ft 
ft 
» 
* 
ft 
* 
ft 
ft 
* 
* 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
* 
ft 
* 
ft 
* 
* 
* 
ft 



i 



ECONOMICAL 



■INK' 

¥¥¥ 




* 
t 

* 
* 

* 
* 

* 

f 
* 

♦ 
* 

* 

Furnishing * 
* 



Barbour's Tablet Ink possesses many 
advantages over the best liquid ink, 
and is sold at a lower price. Dis- 
solve a tablet in water and you get 
a dead black, permanent ink, that 
flows freely, does not gum, leaves 
no sticky, mussy sediment in the ink 
well, does not corrode the pen. You 
make t as you want it. If you buy 
it and don't like it, send it back and 
we'll return your money. 

For fifteen cents, we will send 
enough tablets to make half a pint of 
combined writing and copying ink. 

For fifty cents, .we will send 
enough tablets to make a gallon 
of the best "school" ink you 
ever saw. School ink won't copy. 

¥¥¥ 

65 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 

Andrews 
School 



Company 



RISE & GATES, 

Photo Artists, 

142 North Eighth Street 
LEBANON, PA. 



SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS TO STUDENTS. 

Please Mention "The College Forum." 

SCHMIDT &FEINSTEIN, THE LEADING JEWELERS, 731 Cumberland St 

Graduate Optician. Eyes Examined and Refracted. Fit Gnaranteed or no ray. 
Glasses as Cheap as the Cheapest. 



THE COLLEGE FOKUM. 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Vol. IX. No. 3. 



ANNVILLE, PA., MARCH, 1896. 



Whole No. 89. 



Houri* Song of Welcome. 



♦Houri, a beautiful-eyed nymph of Paradise, who, in 
accord with Mohammedan faith, will attend upon the 
faithful in the world to come. 

" the Houri glances are 

Imbued with all the beauty 
Which we worship in a star." — Poe. 

To the realms of pearl and ruby and gold, 
I welcome thee now 
With a waving of bough, 
spirit, arisen from earth's sullen mold 
To the realms of pearl and ruby and gold ! 

the airs that are fragrant with spices and 
sweet, 

May the lungs of thy soul 
Take eternally dole 
As much as to thee proveth happily meet 
Of the airs that are fragrant with spices and 
sweet. 

And the fruits of this region forever are thine ! 

Its olives and figs, 

And the sweetest of twigs, 
With a bark that is myrrh and a sap of red wine; 
All the fruits of this region forever are thine ! 

It is thine of the waters to smell and to taste ! 
Of the waters of salts 
And of sugary malts; 
Of the waters that angels for battles have 
braced, 

"is thine of such waters to smell and to taste ! 

Hark and list to the music prepared for thee 
here ! 
The music of lyre 
m, And vocalized fire 
,i at burns in the tones of Israfel's cheer ! 
s tue grandest of music prepared for thee 
here ! 

And thy friends are the angels and seraphs and 

With no falseness of eye, 
^ With no leer or a sigh ; 

, s halt love them for ages that ever endure, 
thy friends are the angels and seraphs and 
pure. 

he realms of pearl and ruby and gold, 

I welcome thee now 
OsT,i,-u Uh a wa ving of bough, 
To t n arisen from earth's sullen mold 
e realms of pearl and ruby and gold ! 

Norman C. SchuchTER, '97- 



Music. 

Music is, in its structure, as profound as 
any other science; both music and acou- 
stics have a great sympathy with Euclid 
and geometry; a good mathematician 
only can thoroughly understand their 
principles. Yet there is much in music 
which any ordinary mind can understand, 
and more which a good ear can appre- 
ciate. Much may be attained by a few 
hours' study, and more still by a few 
months' practice. A man, however, may 
be a good singer or performer, and yet not 
a good musician. The eye is the recipient 
of the impressions of the beautiful, and 
the ear the chamber of the impress of 
music; one is a camera lucida, and the 
other a music hall. Light reveals to the 
eye the tints of the flower, the brilliancy 
of the stars, the splendors of the sky and 
the beauties of the landscape; the air 
carries on its wings the tones, and vibra- 
tions, and harmonies of Haydn, Handel, 
Mozart, and Mendelssohn. Pleasures 
that really elevate are cheap; those that 
injure and debase are expensive. 

The flowers that beautify the earth 
with color and delight the passer-by with 
fragrance are everywhere; the poison 
berry and the deadly nightshade are 
found only in the untrodden swamps. 
The greatest joys are on the highway. 
If we wish to gaze upon the landscape 
we know that the various parts of it be- 
long to different owners, but its most 
beautiful part the beggar at the roadside 
owns as much as they, and can enjoy it 
as much as they enjoy it. So of music ; 
any ear may hear the wind. It is a great 
leveller; more than that, it is a great 
dignifier and elevator. The wind that 
rushes through the organ of Westminster 
Abbey has first passed the barrel organ 
of some poor Italian boy ; the voice of 
Patti and that of the street singer have 
but one common capital to draw on — the 
catholic atmosphere, the unsectarian air, 
the failure of which would be the utter 



34 



TEE COLLEGE FORUM. 



extinction of Handel, Haydn and all 
the rest. This air or atmosphere — this 
compound of nitrogen and oxygen, to 
which we are so deeply indebted — some- 
times plays the musician of itself, and 
calls upon Handel, Haydn, Mozart and 
Mendelssohn upon the ocean and in the 
forest, and they, like invisible but not in- 
audible performers, make glorious music. 
Sometimes the shrouds of a ship, as she 
rolls on the tempestuous deep, raise wild 
and piercing sopranos to the skies ; some- 
times the trees and branches of a forest 
of gigantic pines become mighty harp- 
strings, smitten by rushing tempests, 
sending forth grand and incessant har- 
monies — now anthems, and then dirges ; 
sometimes the Waves of the ocean re- 
spond like white-robed choristers to the 
thunder-bass of the sky, and so make 
creation's grand oratorio, in which "the 
heavens are telling ' ' and the earth is 
praising God ; sometimes deep calls unto 
deep, the Mediterranean to the German 
Sea, and both to the Atlantic Ocean, and 
these, the Moses and the Miriam of the 
earth, awaken rich antiphones, and form 
the opposite choirs, responding from side 
to side in Nature's grand cathedral, prais- 
ing and adoring their Creator and Builder. 
Were man silent, God would not want 
praise. 

Everybody is more or less of a musician, 
though he knows it not. We laugh, and 
speak, and cry, and ask in music. A 
laugh is produced by repeating, in quick 
succession, two sounds which differ from 
each other by a single whole tone; a cry, 
arising from pain or grief, is the utter- 
ance of two sounds, differing from each 
other half a tone; a yawn runs down a 
whole octave before it ceases; a cough 
may be expressed by musical intervals; a 
question cannot be asked without the 
change of tone which musicians call a 
fifth, a sixth or an eighth. This is the 
music of nature, and there is not a man 
who speaks five minutes without gliding 
through the whole musical scale, only, 
in speaking, the tones, not being pro- 
tracted, glide imperceptibly into each 
other. In short, every sound of the 
human lip is loaded with music. One 
man's voice will pronounce your name 
so musically and beautifully that it will 
sound grander than a duke's or an earl's; 
another man will pronounce your name 
so unmusically and harshly that, let it be 
the Duke of Wellington's, it will sound 



as common as John Smith or John Ancter* 
son. 

All human life has seemed to the poet 
Longfellow, he tells us, a vast and mys- 
terious cathedral, amid whose solitary 
aisles and under whose sublime roof 
mystic tones and melodies perpetually 
roll. 

The mood we are in gives meaning to 
the sound. We hear at times from its 
chantry a funeral psalm of life that has 
called up the pale faces of the dead; at 
other times, mysterious sounds from the 
past and future, as from belfries outside 
the cathedral; and again, a mournful, 
melancholy, watery peal of bells, as is 
heard sometimes at sea, from cities far off 
below the horizon. 

Walk out on some wild common, on a 
still, frosty night; the deep and over- 
whelming silence is almost audible; from 
the measureless heights and depths of air 
there comes to us a rich undertone, half 
sound, half whisper, as if we could hear 
the crumbling and falling away of earth 
and all created things, in Nature's pro- 
cesses of reproduction and decay— the 
very sounds, as it were, of the lapse and 
rushing of the sands of life in the great 
hourglass of time. 

Music is universally appreciated. The 
English ploughboy sings as he drives his 
team; the Scotch Highlander makes the 
glens and gray moors resound with his 
beautiful song; the Swiss, Tyrolese and 
Carpathians lighten their labor by music; 
the muleteer of Spain cares little who sits 
on the throne or behind it, if he can only 
have his early carol; the vintager ot 
Sicily has his evening hymn, even beside 
the fire of the burning mountain; the 
fisherman of Naples has his boat song, to 
which his rocking boat beats time on 
that beautiful sea; and the gondolier 
Venice still keeps up his midnight setfj 
nade, and what American is not fi\ le ^ 
with patriotic emotion upon hearing 

nation 1 



1 



patriotic 
sweet strains from 



one 



upon 
of our 



airs. 

The connection between music a 
morals is very close. 

No man can hear the heavenly o 1 
symphony of Beethoven without a 
eral purification of his being 
of the greater works of the great cu^n 
sers fail in awakening the nobler se 
ments of the soul of every one that JJ , 
Some are moved to tears by ' 



iflth 



Not one 



it 



some are awakened to nobler r e 



TEE COLLEGE FORUM. 



35 



his 
[he 
his 
aid 
sic; 
sits 
nly 
of 
ide 
the 



se- 
lect 
ing 
nal 



some feel their whole spiritual being in- 
vigorated ; some have the gamut of their 
emotional nature swept with profound 
effect. Every one is moved by music. 
That man who is merely pleased by a per- 
formance of Handel's " Messiah," or who 
can hear the majestic Mozart "Requiem" 
without any other feeling than that of 
mere enjoyment, is cast in a defective 
mold. There is something lacking in his 
nobler nature. Music cuts us off from 
purely material things. It is food for the 
soul. It makes us forget the physical 
part of ourselves, and in the more perfect, 
yet ephemeral, development of our moral 
nature we learn to know more of our inner 
being. Shakespeare paid his homage to 
the power of music in these beautiful 
lines : 

The man that hath no music in himself, 

Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, 

Is fit for treason, stratagems and spoils ; 

The motions of his spirits are dull as night, 

And his affections dark as Erebus ! 

Let no such man be trusted. 

W. ISOMER HEILMAN. 



My Dream. 



A FANCY. 



The hour was late, the night far spent, 
I had just returned from one of the 
numerous holiday festivities, which were 
keeping my brain in a continuous whirl 
°f joyous, bewildering excitement, so 
strangely new after the months of toil 
and study through which I had recently 
been passing. 

Too tired, almost, to think, I threw 
%self upon the couch in my cozy little 
jjbrary and drowsily watched the tiny, 
blue flames in the open grate dancing to 
a nd fro like spirits from a far-off land, 
n ow striving to reach some invisible spot, 
n ,°w falling behind some obstacle, only to 
|} Se again with a mightier effort; and 
tae n, as though attaining the desired 
Soal, slowly sinking down to hide behind 
£ es e barriers until some new object 
s bould arouse their ambition. 
t , Gradually my eyes began to close and 
ne sprites to vanish, but no sooner had 
.^ disappeared entirely than I felt an 
^istible impulse to open my eyes, and 
> I was no longer in my own cozy room, 
% to sleep from exhaustion, but out 
* J great plain, through which a broad 
ad passed. This was bordered on one 



side by a great, dark hedge, over the top 
of which could be seen trees covered with 
brilliant foliage and beautiful flowers, 
while here and there were glimpses of 
most luscious fruit. 

The road was thronged with many per- 
sons, all journeying in the same direction. 
Some of these were making the air ring 
with the sound of merry voices in happy 
song and gay laughter, thus whiling 
away their time, and meanwhile passing 
over the ground at a much more rapid 
pace than they realized. Some, moving 
slowly with wearied tread and a far-away, 
hopeless expression on their sad faces, 
seemed to be entirely lost to everything 
about them, as if they were contempla- 
ting some crushing sorrow or disappoint- 
ment which had overtaken them earlier 
in their journey; for them, indeed, the 
way was long and painful. Others, with 
their gaze bent downward, searched in- 
tently over the rough and stony way for 
something which apparently they could 
not find. Still others could be seen with 
their attention centered on the hedge 
close by, striving to obtain a position 
near it. 

Unnoticed by any of the travellers, 
after my bewilderment had ceased, I fell 
to wondering what could be the meaning 
of the scene which had been so suddenly 
thrust before my eyes. Soon I grew con- 
scious of a presence near me, and, glanc- 
ing around, beheld a man of neat appear- 
ance and kindly face who was watching 
my astonished gaze with an amused 
smile. 

When he perceived that I was aware 
of his presence, he said, " would you see 
more of yonder mysterous assemblage?" 
I assented, and, in obedince to his single 
word "come," we passed along on the 
plane above, at some little distance from 
the road, which was about a foot lower 
than the surrounding country, and, mov- 
ing more slowly than the travellers, we 
watched them. As we passed along my 
guide told me that none on that road 
were able to pause or return, but all must 
constantly move forward, and those who 
stumble or fall are compelled by some 
power to rise and, even though disabled, 
to contine their journey. As he spoke 
my attention was attracted to a young 
man at the side of the road nearest to us. 
He was endeavoring to make a way for 
himself to the other side, but his task was 
by no means an easy one. At times, seeing 




36 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



a gap in the procession, he would take 
advantage of it only to be jostled aside 
by the ever advancing throng. Finally 
by perseverance he reached the desired 
position and, after walking close to the 
hedge a few moments, disappeared within 
it. Now I noticed others, young and 
old, men and women, in the middle as 
well as on the edge of the road — follow- 
ing the direction of the young man with 
their attention also centered on the hedge 
and striving to reach it. As they did so 
the solitary, sad person together with the 
gay companies were being slowly pushed 
to the outer edge of the road, apparently, 
unconscious of the efforts of their fellow 
travellers. Occasionally one or two of 
these would wake to a realization of the 
endeavors of the others, and would eager- 
ly join them, sometimes also disappear- 
ing through the hedge, but more often 
giving up the struggle in despair. 

My attention was now attracted by one 
of those who moved along slowly with his 
eyes riveted to the ground. Suddenly 
he stooped and picked up a brightly 
colored leaf which had fallen over the 
hedge, and, after looking at it fondly for a 
moment, put it into a small box such as 
all these treasure seekers carried, and 
which box I noticed contained a few 
other leaves and one or two petals which 
had been the reward of his diligent search. 
As he fastened the lid to protect his al- 
ready partially withered treasures from 
the sun, he glanced around just in time to 
see a man disappear through the hedge a 
step or two behind him. Seeing a possi- 
bility of gaining greater wealth, he im- 
diately threw away his box and eagerly 
joined the throng seeking an entrance 
through this wall of green. 

Turning to my companion, I asked, 
"Why do so many seek the hedge?" 
"Observe closely," was the reply. I 
did so and soon discovered that the hedge 
was not a solid bank of foliage as a cas- 
ual glance had led me to suppose, but 
here and there had openings which varied 
in size. Some were wide enough for a 
large man to enter, by simply brushing 
the leaves aside, but were guarded by 
gates which open at intervals only long 
enough to admit one person and then re- 
closed. The other openings were smaller 
and not closed by gates, but were often 
almost obscured by the surrounding fol- 
iage. The larger openings were few, but 
there were many so small that in order to 



pass through them the traveller m Ust 
stoop. These were often passed by u n . 
noticed in the search for larger ones. 

Through the larger openings I could 
catch glimpses of a road similar to the 
outer one, but not as stony and tnuch 
more attractive. There was also a hedge 
beyond through which some were trying 
to pass. 

My companion then told me that there 
were numerous roads, all leading to the 
same goal, but each more attractive and 
easy to travel than the next outer one, 
till the last was the most delightful along 
which to journey, but that, on account 
of the watchfulness necessary to detect 
the openings leading from one to another, 
very few ever reached the innermost one. 

Reading a question in my face, he an- 
swered : 4 ' This road — for it is but one- 
is Human Life, and the openings which 
continually present new possibilities are 
Opportunities. See that you neglect 
them not." With this warning he dis- 
appeared. 

I watched the moving throng a little 
while longer, but gradually it became in- 
distinct and a few moments later disap- 
peared, leaving me once more in my little 
library with my ever-changing flame fan- 
cies and with a new determination to 
seek and to seize every opportunity that 
the future might present. 

Contributor. 



Impressions of the University Exten- 
sion Summer Meeting. 

OSCAR ELLIS GOOD, A. M. 



On the 29th day of last June Prof. J- 
A. McDermad and the writer had hoped 
to journey together to the City of Brotn- 
erly Love on our way to the University 
of Pennsylvania, where we hoped t0 
drink freely at that fountain of wisdom. 

That day, however, found our Gre» 
Professor ill at his home, and I ^* 
obliged to enter upon the journey alor 1 • 
The summer meeting was opened on t 
evening of the same day, with a lec W 
on "Democracy," in the Library or ^ 
University, by Professor Woodrow vv 
son, of Princeton University. This 
ture was given free to all summer rn 
ing students. The Professor pointe 
the vast differences between the d e£n0 Jorf 
cies of ancient times or of the rue 



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THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



3T 




Swiss cantons and modern democracy as 
it exists in the United States, where ' ' the 
people who are said to govern are the 
people of a great nation, a vast popula- 
tion which never musters into any sin- 
gle assembly, whose members never see 
each others' faces or hear each others' 
voices, but live, millions strong, up and 
down the reaches of continents ; building 
scores of great cities throughout fair 
provinces that would in other days them- 
selves have been kingdoms ; following all 
callings under all climes ; and yet not 
separate, but standing fast in a vital 
union of thought and of institutions, 
conceiving themselves a corporate whole ; 
acting so, and so accepted by the world." 

The speaker contended that many 
vague phrases are prevalent with refer- 
ence to the character of our government 
which convey little meaning and in some 
instances leave entirely wrong impres- 
sions. He maintained that the people 
govern by consenting to be governed on 
condition that a certain part of them do 
the governing, and that the best govern- 
ment is the one that has the best methods 
of selecting the governing class; that a 
democratic form of government is only a 
suitable one for trained nations who have 
learned the lesson of self control. The 
lecture was a glowing tribute to the 
good sense of the American people and 
should have stimulated every hearer to 
awaken to a fuller realization of his ex- 
alted privilege as a citizen of this great 
country. Among other interesting and 
instructive lectures which it was the 
writer's privilege to hear, in addition to 
those of his own department, was one 
given by Dr. Schwatt of the University 
°f Pennsylvania on " Mathematics," and 
another by Dr. Edward Everett Hale, in 
Jhich he gave some of his "Personal 
Reminiscences of Daniel Webster, Ed- 
ward Everett and Charles Summer." 
. T he work in the Biological Department 
111 which I was most directly interested 
^ as conducted by Doctors Wilson, Mac- 
Jnane and Cope, of the University of 
jjnnsylvania, Dr. Kingsley, of Tufts 
)ji? lle ge, and other prominent biologists. 
i & e excellent equipment of the Biological 
^oratory of the University, by means of 
nich ample opportunity was given to 
% the statements of the lecturers, 
* ae this department exceedingly pleas- 
than^ Profitable to those engaged in 
at hne of study . While the intellectual 



wants of the students were thus amply 
provided for, the management did not fail 
to provide equally well for their social 
wants. 

The 4th of July was the day set apart 
for an excursion to Haverford College, 
where the students were heartily wel- 
comed by President Sharpless. Chairs 
having been placed on the campus for 
the convenience of the students, ad- 
dresses of a patriotic character were given 
by Profs. Cope, Adams, Dr. Hale and 
others. Lunch was served on the College 
premises and the afternoon spent in the 
library and other places of interest about 
the college. 

Among other interesting features of a 
like character was a scientific excursion 
to Atco, New Jersey, under the direction 
of Dr. Macfarlane, for the benefit of the 
students in biology, and another to Ger- 
mantown. An excellent description of 
the battle was given by the editor of the 
Philadelphia Times. We were then con- 
ducted through the Chew House, which 
had been seized and barricaded by the 
British during the battle. Here were to 
be seen quite a collection of interesting 
relics of Revolutionary times, and not 
far from this place stands an old fence 
full of bullet holes, which, it is claimed, 
were received in that hard-fought battle 
of over a century ago. Cramp's Ship- 
yard, Girard College and the Penitentiary 
were some of the other points of interest 
visited by the summer students in a body. 

In truth a more desirable place for the 
summer meeting could scarcely have 
been selected. Philadelphia is so inti- 
mately connected with early American 
history as to make her specially dear to 
the student and patriot. Here are Car- 
penter's and Independence Halls, of Rev- 
olutionary fame, within whose sacred 
walls the beholder is powerless to prevent 
the patriotic emotions which take com- 
plete possession of him ; here can be seen 
the bell that ' 'Proclaimed liberty through- 
out all the land unto all the inhabitants 
thereof;" here rest the mortal remains of 
Dr Franklin ; and here the eventful step 
was taken that released a nation from 
servitude and started her on the way to 
unparalleled progress and power. Such 
are some of the interesting features in and 
about the city, many more of which might 
be named. Learned divines consented to 
preach special sermons for the benefit ot 
' the Summer Meeting ~ 



students, the vari- 



38 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



cms libraries of the city opened their doors 
freely to them, and in short everything 
was done that could be done to make 
their stay in the city pleasant and profit- 
able. Another interesting feature of the 
summer meeting is that to some extent 
at least it brings the student in touch 
with the spirit and purpose of the promo- 
ters of university extension work. Va- 
rious university extension societies exist 
in the United States and in Europe. All 
these, while differing in methods of pro- 
cedure, have one purpose in view, namely, 
the extension of opportunities for a higher 
education to the masses of our citizens. 

The American Society for the Exten- 
tension of University Teaching, under 
whose auspices the summer meeting in 
Philadelphia was held, seeks to accom- 
plish this result by making each univer- 
sity that will cooperate with it a center 
of university extension. The Society 
proposes to establish centers where no 
college or university is located, provided 
vided the community concerned manifests 
sufficient interest to defray the necessary 
expenses, which are reduced to a mini- 
mum. 

To scatter these centers broadcast over 
the country will require time, patience 
and arduous labor, as well as liberal sup- 
plies of money. The work of the Amer- 
ican Society is carried on largely by 
means of the voluntary contributions re- 
ceived from friends of the movement, the 
only other source of income being the fees 
of members connected with the Society. 

This fact would indicate that Ameri- 
can men of means are being made to edu- 
cate the whole body of the American peo- 
ple. It is interesting to note the progress 
that the world has made during the past 
three centuries. In each of these one 
social idea predominated over all others. 

The Sixteenth and Seventeenth Cen- 
turies found Europe ready, under the 
leadership of a few heroic Dutch prov- 
inces, to shake off the fetters of religious 
despotism. The Eighteenth Century 
taught the world the lesson of civil lib- 
erty. It delivered Europe from threat- 
ened universal despotism on the part of 
France, and America from the equally 
oppressive despotism of Great Britain. 
And now, at the close of the Nineteenth 
Century, we look forward to the time 
when universal education, having ele- 
vated the race and made it capable of 
better things, will settle all difficulties 



without having recourse to the barbar- 
ous methods employed in the Seventeenth 
and Eighteenth Centuries. This end the 
American Society seeks to attain in this 
country. 

_ Perhaps, one of our greatest national 
sins is the madness with which we enter 
into the race for wealth. If university 
extension workers succeed in directing 
the energy expended in this way so as to 
bring opportunities for a higher education 
within the reach of the masses, they will 
have laid the foundation for a national 
greatness that will find no parallel on the 
pages of history. Let every earnest 
scholar, every man of wealth, every 
ardent lover of his country, encourage, 
in every way possible, a movement so 
worthy of the talents of the noble char- 
acters devoted to it; for what imaginative 
mind can form a picture of the society of 
that day when the dream of these enthu- 
siastic workers shall be realized? 



"Marcella" Again. 

This great and comparatively recent 
novel of Mrs. Humphry Ward is but a 
chapter torn from the pages of that great 
volume, the " Book of Life." The author 
tells a story of to-day ; and in such a style 
that one becomes, while reading it, com- 
pletely forgetful of self, seeming in the 
meanwhile to live and act with the char- 
acters of the story. She goes into the 
deepest places of life's struggles and vic- 
tories, from the mansions of the rich and 
great to the hovels of the poor and igno- 
rant, thus carrying the mind of the reader 
with her throughout the book. Fr° ffl 
the beginning to the end one is so deeply 
concerned with the fate of the heroine 
that not until we have reached the la st 
page do we realize that it is the story oj 
a soul as well as of a life. " Marcella 
is to the very end the story of a soul s 
love, and all else is subordinate to tni 
theme. The joys and sorrows of hum 3 ' 
relationship, and the hypocrisies as ^ e 
as the goodness of society and poll' tic. 
are all helpful to the interpretation ot ^ 
power of love in a human soul. .,1 

Mrs. Ward begins her story ^ 
"Marcella" as a school girl, marks vw 
acurately the development of her c. 
acter and the instilling of P rinC1 £ f 
which govern her whole future cours J 
action, until she was twenty-one y e ^ nn 
age, when she was taken to her 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



39 



tr- 
ies 



ff hich was on an estate near the city of 
London. Prior to this she had spent 
ve ry little time with her father and 
mother. Having sent her to school very 
young, they paid little attention to her, 
and knew nothing of the ideas that were 
being implanted into the mind of their 
daughter, until when she came among 
them it was as a well developed socialist, 
with the creed " Blessed are the poor," 
"Woe unto you, rich man," firmly im- 
planted in her nature. 

And thus did she devote her early life 
to the work of bringing the poor and the 
rich on the same plane of equality. While 
engaged in this work Aldrous Raeburn, 
the nephew of Lord Raeburn, became 
deeply interested in her, and when he 
finally asked her to share his lot in life, 
although they did not agree in their so- 
cialistic ideas, she accepted, not because 
she loved him, but because she loved her 
work and thought he would be of great 
assistance in the furthering of her plans. 
But " Marcella " soon discovered some 
greater love was necessary and within a 
week of the wedding she confessed her 
failings to her lover and once more be- 
came free. Then it was that she "shed the 
bitter tears that transformed her youth." 

Then it was that she began to realize 
that not only the poor demand our atten- 
tion, but our protection and sympathies 
must extend farther than these places of 
trouble and discontent. It was then that 
she learned that the ultimate issues of fife 
are not in conditions, but in character. 

After this she spent some time in Lon- 
don, becoming a "Sister of Charity" and 
doing much toward relieving pain and 
suffering wherever it was necessary. < 

Finally, after some sorrows and misun- 
derstandings, Marcella and Raeburn be- 
came reconciled, and the book closes 
with each happy in the other's love. 
s ich, in brief, is a sketch of the novel. 

At first thought ' ' Marcella ' ' would be 
considered a story of labor and socialism. 
T his is true, but not in the sense in which 
^any understand it. There is no at- 
tempt to settle the question of theory and 
detail in regard to these subjects. The 
s ^ ru ggle of life, the entanglements of the 
ric h and poor, the perplexities of human 
existence here unfolded, are found within 
^ e sphere of socialism and labor, but the 
P°Pular theme of the book is, what is the 
rue mission of the women of the nine- 



^enth. 



century ? 



Shall she do as Marcella did, spend her 
time wholly in socialistic work, not so 
much for her own satisfaction as for the 
satisfaction of the people about her whom 
she loved and in whom she was inter- 
ested ? 

Should she neglect the parents who 
protected her youth, and neglect the 
home, wherein so much of the safety of 
a nation depends, or should she first pay 
the debt she owes to her parents and her 
home by first exerting her talents to in- 
sure their cheerfulness and comfort, and 
then allowing her influence to widen and 
widen until it reaches the great world 
outside. 

Marcella' s home surroundings were of 
that cold, feelingless character that is 
found in too many homes of to-day. 
Parents and daughter were strangers to 
each other. Everything worked mechan- 
ically. No one made any particular ex- 
ertion to make the rest happy. Hence, 
hers was a home devoid of any mutual 
sympathy. 

When we study a home like this we 
cannot help but think Marcella 's first 
duty was to have broken down the bar- 
riers that surrounded her parents and to 
have woven herself into their lives, until 
she could, at least, have gotten them to 
enlist their sympathies in her socialistic 
plans, and in this way her father, with 
her, might have accomplished so much 
more successfully the work that she was 
trying to undertake alone, namely, that 
of improving the condition of his ten- 
ants. , , . , 

But how did Marcella solve this prob- 
lem? She was of such a nature that 
whatever she attempted reflected her own 
enthusiasm. She was a socialist, for she 
believed that her work extended out 
towards the poor and discouraged people 
outside of her home circle to thrill them 
with hopes of a bright future; therefore, 
she exerted all her powers for the accom- 
plishment of this one end, neglecting all 
religious duties and sacrificing all pleas- 
ure and all social enjoyment for this one 

great work. , . , 

She was confronted with j ust such ques- 
tions as daily face us. 

The great social problems of our day 
must be met also in some form The 
ereat conflict between capital and labor 
that often produces disastrous strikes, and 
that is still far from being understood the 
great "sweating system," by which not 



40 



The college forum. 



only men but women and children are 
compelled to work for a mere pittance, 
less than enough to keep the body and 
soul alive ; and the great " tenement sys- 
tem," which destroys the physical and 
moral well-being of families, are questions 
which stare us as a nation in the face, and 
that must soon be solved, and that are be- 
ing solved, though somewhat slowly. 

Marcella, in her daily work, coming in 
contact with these three great problems 
met them bravely, sometimes endangering 
her life for the accomplishment of some 
improvement, and this is perhaps the 
only way whereby this great question 
can be solved. 

In "Marcella" nothing can be more 
effective than the way in which Mrs. 
Ward has brought the different apects of 
the social problem into striking relief by 
the power with which she has set the tu- 
mult and misery of the lower half of the 
world over against the repose and culture 
of the upper half. Indeed, nothing could 
be more effective than the contrast drawn 
between the satisfied opulent life of the 
English nobility and the restlessness of 
those whom fortune had disinherited. 
In this way our author reveals the im- 
mensity of this great problem and brings 
out its moral elements. 

She presents this contrast to our minds 
and marks the influence that such sur- 
roundings would have on the nature and 
destiny of a woman of deep feeling, noble 
in disposition, but impetuous and un- 
trained. 

In just these salient points "Marcella" 
is a great novel, because it reveals to us 
so truly the real life of one soul and 
makes even the great social problem sub- 
servient. 

The book has proved a success, because 
the author has dealt not only with the 
characters in her story, but with the 
great social problem of her novel from 
out the experience of her own life. 

Marcella spent her life in working out 
these great world problems and, as the 
result of her rich and vital experience, 
she took a pledge which we, who still 
have these great questions of our nine- 
teenth century to face and conquer, 
should uphold as our motto. With Mar- 
cella, "we can think, with mingled smiles 
and tears, of our plans for this bit of 
earth that fate has brought under our 
hands, and pledge ourselves to every man, 
woman and child in it so to live our lives 



that each one of theirs should be ti 
richer for it." 

Esteixe Stehman, '96. 



The Book of the Centuries. 

John Bunyan has stamped his name 
indelibly upon the pages of English lit- 
erature by writing Pilgrim's Progress. No 
man ever wielded so wide, so noble and 
so lasting an influence by writing one 
book as he. This work of his possesses 
a wide circulation in all lands. Its trans- 
lation is not limited to civilized lan- 
guages, bnt savage and barbarian races 
exult with satisfaction and thankfulness 
in the possession of a version. 

Pilgrim's Progress, as approaching the 
Bible in its simplicity and clearness of 
style and argument, is adapted to all times 
and conditions of men. The burden of 
centuries cannot hide its worth or rob it 
of its newness. Religious creeds and 
gross infidelity as well as scientific falsi- 
ties may hurl their vain condemnations 
and useless arguments against it, but it 
will remain firm and ever be cherished by 
all good men, as a work of great worth. 

It is a charm in youth, a pleasure in 
old age, a consolation and a guide to the 
Christian, a warning and a call to the un- 
converted, a priceless treasure to the 
pauper, an invaluable companion to 
princes, a boon to all. Humanity has 
been inestimably benefited by Pilgrim's 
Progress and humanity does homage to 
the author. The poor tinker of Bedford- 
shire receives the blessings and gratifica- 
tions of all upon whose lives his work has 
shown with its unpretending brilliancy of 
truth and wisdom. He who fails tore- 
cognize in Pilgrim's Progress a literary 
work of high merit must needs be ign°" 
rant of many things necessary to pass 
j udgment in this case. Pretentious works 
of high-minded authors gain popularity 
by farce, but modest simplicity and noble 
motives in the author never fail to receive 
and hold the reverence and admiration 01 
the polished and the ignorant. 

Bunyan wrote from experience and ob- 
servation. All the trials and temptations, 
joys and expectations that Christian ex- 
perienced as he progressed in his pilg rlD *j 
age are emblematic of his own life a . n . 
those around him, and those things wbi c 
the Bible teaches to be true. Pilgrim^ 
Progress is so true to all things laid doW 
in the Bible that, it is said, if the Biw 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



41 



were wanting, this book could with pro- 
priety to a great extent fill its office. 

There is something characterizing Pil- 
afim's Progress throughout that appeals 
to the better nature of man and makes 
him feel that it is true, that the call to sin- 
ners to repent is urgent and that there is 
more in being a Christian than we often- 
times think. 

R. P. Dougherty, '97. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 

THE COLLEGE FORUM is published monthly through- 
out the college year by the Philokosmian Society of Leba- 
non Valley College. 

H. CLAY DEANBR, '79, Editor-in-Chief. 



ASSISTANT EDITORS. 

H. H. Hbberlt, '96. Ira E. Albert, '97. 

N. C. Scbxichtbr, '97. Jacob Zbrbk, '98. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
H. Clay Deaner, '79, Publisher. 
W. G. Clippinger, '98, Business Manager. 
C. H. Sleichter, '96, Assistant Business Manager. 



Terms: Twenty-five cents a year, five cents per copy. 

THE COLLEGE FORUM will be forwarded to all sub- 
scribers until an order is received for its discontinuance, 
and until all arrearages have been paid. 



Address all business communications to W. G. 
Clippinger, Annville, Pa. 

Address all communications for publication, ex- 
changes, etc., to Box 776, Annville, Pa. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as 
second-class mail matter. 



Efcttorial. 



We ask the special attention of our 
student-readers to the Fiction Prize, of- 
fered by The Bachelor of Arts, and no- 
ticed in our "Exchanges" this month. 
It is worthy the consideration of all 
allege littirateu rs. 



Our present issue is in certain respects 
a notable one. The delicately executed 
kncy "My Dream" and the skillful 
tr eatise on " Music" fully merit the at- 
tention of our readers. We are trying 
to ma ^e The Forum so helpful to each 
stu dent that he will not want to miss a 
J m §le issue. Next month we will pub- 

lsh much of interest. The locals will be 
Specially good. 

Quite a number of our subscribers are 



in arrears with their subscription to the 
Forum. To some of these we have mailed 
recently a circular letter and a coin card 
with the request that they pay up their 
arrearages. 

A goodly number have promptly re- 
sponded, but there are still some from 
whom we have not had a reply. Dear 
friends, will you not remit immediately 
and also give us your renewal for another 
year? 

Whether card playing is right or not 
we will not say, but we do say most as- 
suredly that it is not right to indulge in 
this amusement on the Sabbath day. A 
few of our students have been guilty of 
this. Shame, we say, on an}' man, and 
especially a college man, who has no 
more respect for himself or his God than 
to forget the Sabbath day to keep it holy! 
This debasing work should be frowned 
upon by every student who loves right, 
because it is right. 



The students' meeting held on the 
afternoon of the Day of Prayer revealed 
the fact that our school is maintaining its 
strong religious influence. The addresses 
were all most charmingly flavored with 
college patriotism and a spirit of loyalty 
that must be effective in binding our 
hearts closer to our beloved institution. 
We believe more meetings of this kind 
would be a great help and serve to 
awaken us to a sense of our patriotic and 
religious duties while in college. It is a 
pleasure to know that our Christian As- 
sociations are most prosperous and that 
the special Bible classes are actively at 
work. t 

The attention of the students and our 
readers in general is called to the adver- 
tisement of A. G. Spalding & Bros., 
which we are carrying in another column. 
Their spring and summer line of baseball 
and athletic supplies is unsurpassed, their 
trade legend, "Spalding Highest Qual- 



I 



42 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



ity," on their goods being absolute guar- 
antee that the article bearing it is the best 
that can be produced . The managers of 
our track and baseball teams would do 
well to secure estimates from this firm 
before placing their spring orders. 

A handsome catalogue will be mailed 
free to any student sending his address. 



Because the custom of finding fault 
with the professors is laying hold of some 
of our students, we believe the following 
editorial, as it appeared in the Otterbein 
s£gis, can be most fittingly used by us. 
The editor says : ' ' Probably no person is 
subject to so much criticism and com- 
plaint as the college professor. He is 
discussed and criticised on the street cor- 
ners, at the boarding clubs and in the 
private rooms. His faults are magnified 
and ridiculed without charity or mercy. 
With some students such grumbling seems 
to become chronic. Nothing so destroys 
the confidence of other students in a pro- 
fessor or so injures the effect of his teach- 
ing as such frivolous fault finding. Such 
practice on the part of students, whose 
culture should teach them better, not 
only does no good, but always does harm, 
to say nothing of the moral side of the 
question." 

The gymnasium work of the term has 
been enthusiastically carried on. Every 
afternoon the gym is well filled with stu- 
dents and much healthy interest prevails. 
The need of some new apparatus has been 
felt by the athletes, but nevertheless some 
good records have been made. Of these 
the jumping of Henry, '98, is worthy of 
special note. His standing high-jump 
record is four feet three inches, and his 
running high-jump four feet eight inches. 
But before another issue of this paper 
appears, indoor athletics will be practi- 
cally ended for this college year. We 
shall have baseball, tennis and track ath- 
letics. Students, you want this thing 
to be a big success. L,et each be prepared 



to do his share and help make them 
such. We wish the Corona Tennis Club, 
which is privately conducted, as much 
success as an organization of this kind 
should have. And the baseball season 
— we want that to be glorious beyond 
measure ! IT can be. Will it ? 



As we are nearing the close of the 
term, the examinations will soon be the 
leading topic of conversation and com- 
ment on the part of the students. It is a 
sad fact that the faculty has no uniform 
system in the conduct of these knowl- 
edge searchers. Some years ago the stu- 
dents were rejoiced in the announce- 
ment that the exemption system would 
be used here, and, indeed, we judge the 
faculty still thinks this system is the one 
used by them. If it is, it must be a re- 
vised edition that is used by some of this 
honorable body. "Those students who 
make an average term grade of ninety 
will be henceforth exempt from an ex- 
amination," we used to believe was true, 
but we know it is not now the rule. All 
are not guilty of laying aside this rule, 
but a few are. Professor, is it justice to 
make an upper-class man take an ex- 
amination because an under-class man 
must, or vice versa f Surely it is not. 
Hereafter we would like to see the ex- 
emption system used with a true inter- 
pretation. When a man works hard and 
honestly makes his ninety, leave him go- 



Which day of the week serves best as 
a holiday— Monday or Saturday ? This 
question is confronting every colleg e 
faculty that has not yet considered » 
We believe it is fully worth the consider 
ation of every progressive corps 
teachers. We know not if our instructors 
have allowed their busy minds to thin 
on this matter a little or not, but 
know a goodly number of the stu 
have. The chief arguments in ^ aV ° r ^ e 
Monday as the week's holiday are, 



entire wiping out of poor te 



citations 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



43 



which must, almost necessarily, be the 
order of things with the Saturday holiday 
in vogue; and the annihilation of Sunday 
studying. This last named benefit of 
the Monday " off " is certainly a good 
one. It is surprising how many students, 
especially in the larger colleges, use Sun- 
day as a work day and to have this con- 
dition suddenly cease to exist is a power- 
ful argument in favor of the Monday 
belief. We do not know of a single 
school that has reverted to the old cus- 
tom after giving a fair trial to the new. 
We would like to see an opportunity 
given our students to vote on this matter. 
We feel certain that the Monday holiday 
would come and prove most satisfactory 
to students and professors. 



Philokosmian Literary Society. 



Our Alumni. 



Esse Quam Videri. 
R. P. Dougherty, Editor. 



'73. Henry B. Stehman, A. M., M. 
D., who is the popular superintendent of 
the Presbyterian Hospital of the city of 
Chicago, 111., and lecturer in Rush Med- 
ical College of the same city, was recently 
honored with a high testimonial from his 
medical brethren for contributing a valu- 
able paper to one of the leading medical 
journals of his adopted State. 

'78. Rev. H. B. Dohner, B. D., the 
efficient Financial Agent of Union Bibli- 
cal Seminary for the Eastern Conferences, 
is making his work a success, and is 
securing money and notes in time in large 
and small amounts wherever he goes. 

'88. Rev. Joseph K. Wagner, B. S., 
who, by request, was left without work 
W his conference last fall because of 
failing health, is rapidly recovering and 
expects to report for duty again at an 
early day. 

'91. Rev. G. L. Schaffer, A. B., of 
Mountville, in company with Rev. Meyers, 
m ade a very pleasant call at the College 
0t i February nth. 

'94- Samuel F. Huber, A. B., who is 
Jow a student in the law department of 
jhe University of Pennsylvania, paid a 
? rief visit to many friends at Annville a 
lew weeks ago. 

. 95. John H. Maysilles, A. B., now 
employed at Elkins, West Virginia, 
P g aks hopefully of sending a number of 
De ^ students to the College next term. 



We were pleased to have Prof. Deaner 
with us on February 7th. Besides mak- 
ing a good address in our literary session, 
he also read his report as publisher of 
The College Forum. 

Mr. Elmer Heilman, the newspaper 
man, has again resumed active relations 
with the Society. 

New officers were elected on February 
7th, as follows: President, A. S. Ulrich, 
'97; Vice-President, W. G. Clippinger, 
'98; Recording Secretary, H. M. Imbo- 
den, '99; Corresponding Secretary, Allen 
Baer, '99; Organist, J. Q. Deibler, '99; 
Chaplain, C. B. Wingerd, '97; Editor, J. 
Geyer, '98; Janitor, H. H. Heberly, '96. 

Don't forget the elocutionary entertain- 
ment by Mr. and Mrs. Curry, in the 
chapel, on March 6th. This is the last 
regular entertainment offered by our Lec- 
ture Committee, and we urge all to go 
and to take others. The Committee 
needs your patronage. 

The joint session with the Clionians 
was an event long to be remembered by 
the P. Iy. S. boys. The ladies treated 
us most hospitably, and we feel that 
much pleasure and profit was the reward 
of this delightful meeting. 



Clionian Literary Society. 



Virtute et fide. 
Ellen N. Black, Editor. 



The joint session of the P. L- S. and 
C. 1/ S , was a great success, and enjoyed 
by ail the Clios. These meetings are al- 
ways pleasant and profitable. The bene- 
fit derived from them is great, for here 
ideas are interchanged, and a broader 
view of questions under discussion is ob- 
tained. We think they should be held 
more frequently. 

Our new President fills her position 
faithfully. Under her rule the members 
of the Society are realizing what things 
should and can be done. New laws and 
rules have been passed and now there is 
no shirking of duty. Long rule our 
President! 



44 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Miss Strickler, '94, of Lebanon, visited 
the College recently. 

Miss Ruth Mumma had an attack of 
la grippe which we are glad to say was 
not very severe. 

The Department of Shorthand and 
Typewriting, under the direction of one of 
"our girls," is flourishing. The num- 
ber of pupils is large now, and is ex- 
pected to be doubled next term. 

A special program is being prepared 
by the C. L. S. for a near-by date. The 
occasion will be a book reception. 



Personals and Locals. 

Mexican War — cause, Texas ; result, 
taxes. 

I expect you to think on your feet ! 

The boys certainly liked the missionary 
cakes. 

Geyer wants to be classed under the 
heavenly bodies. 

We must have a rare specimen of hu- 
manity in our midst, as one of our pro- 
fessors has declared the gentleman an 
exception to nature. How is it, G ? 

By the latest research made in mythol- 
ogy by one of our aspirants, Minerva 
must have had red hair. It is not proven 
yet, however, and further notice will be 
given concerning the discovery. 

Miss Stehman, '96, was agreeably sur- 
prised a few weeks ago by a visit from 
her intimate friend, Miss Strickler, '94, 
accompanied by Miss Shenk, who was 
her guest at the time 

Mr. Luther Minter, president of the 
Minter Company, at Harrisburg, was 
seen in town lately, and called on his 
friend H. H. Hoy before leaving. 

Mr. B must be making rapid prog- 
ress in Bible history, as he confidently 
declared in class that Joseph delivered 
the Israelites from Egypt. 

Prof, and Mrs. Deaner gave a dinner to 
a large number of friends on the evening 
of the 28th ult. It was tendered in honor 
of Mrs. Piatt, of Denver, who is a sister 
to Mrs. Deaner. 

Judging from the number of times that 
our theologians have been called away to 
preach at various places, we expect 
great results from them after they leave 
college. They are learning that experi- 
ence is the best teacher. 



On a Saturday night recently a large bon- 
fire was discovered on the baseball dia- 
mond, but as usual no one knew anything 
about it, and we must attribute the blaze 
to spontaneous combustion. 

Rev. Jones, of Palmyra, visited the col- 
lege on Sunday, January nth, which re- 
sulted in our friend Weir preaching for 
him in the evening at Gravel Hill. 

Some of the boys say they will make 
practical use of the lecture given by Geo. 
Thos. Dowling, and that is to " Bring up 
their parents in the way they should go." 
Take care, boys, instead of you bringing 
them up they might bring you down. 

The petition handed in by the boarding 
students desiring corn bread to be served 
at the table, seems to have had some 
effect, as the desired article has been seen 
upon the table a few times since. 

The " Quartette " were called toLeba- 
anon on the 26th ult, to furnish music 
for the "Good Citizenship" meeting 
which is held every Sunday afternoon. 
An excellent address on "The Saloon 
License Question ' ' was delivered by law- 
yer Grumbein. 

Why don' t the boys occupy the ' 'Amen" 
corner in church any more ? The follow- 
ing verses may suggest the reason : 

A dozen boys with faces bright, 
The " Amen " pews did spy ; 

And with the view to do the right, 
They marched in front so spry. 

But ah ! they found to their dismay, 
That they must have a care ; 

For now the ladies looked that way, 
And sleep they would not dare. 

The blackboard in Professor Lehman's 
recitation room being in a very poor con- 
dition, enough money was raised by the 
students and a few friends to have it im- 
proved. It is in a fine condition again. 

Prof. Hammond our efficient teacher in 
voice culture, was director and accotn- 
painist at a fine concert given in Lebanon 
on the 10th inst. by the "Arion Club. 
It was attended by a number of our stu- 
dents, who spoke highly of the entertain- 
ment. 

Professor in Latin— Where is the re- 
semblance between the Roman curricula 
(race course) and a college course? 

Student— You can ride through both. 

C. B. Wingerd, '97, filled the P^P 1 ^ ! 
Rev. Jones, of Palmyra, very acceptaw 
on Tuesday, the 7th ult. . e 

H. E. Miller '99 is at present taWDB 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



45 



charge of West Lebanon U. B. Church. 
The regular pastor Rev. Gambler is ill 
and is unable to attend to his duties. 

We feel very sorry that our friend Mr. 
Buddinger had to leave us. He was a 
warm friend of all the boys and his ab- 
sence is felt by all. He accepted Middle- 
burg charge in the East German Confer- 
ence, thus making his departure necessary. 
We wish him every success in his new 
field of labor. 

The fifteenth anniversary of the wed- 
ding of Rev. and Mrs. Lewars was cele- 
brated at the Lutheran parsonage on 
February 3d. It was an occasion of great 
pleasure, not only to the happy couple 
but also to the many friends present who 
tendered their congratulations. Our male 
quartette furnished music during the 
evening, winning new laurels for them- 
selves. They especially enjoyed the re- 
freshments which were served in abund- 
ance. 

Sheesly suddenly departed from town 
on a cold morning of last month. He was 
probably sent on some private business 
by the League of Death. 

Rev. Roads, pastor of Pleasant Hill U. 
B. Church at Lebanon, gave a grand con- 
cert for the benefit of the church. Among 
the different talent engaged for the occa- 
sion our quartette figured prominently. 
Norman Schlichter, '97, also recited some 
selections in his usual able manner. 

Very interesting exercises were given 
on College Day in Trinity U. B. Church. 
Instructive addresses were delivered, be- 
tween which the quartette furnished music 
adding to the interest of the occasion. 
, Our regular monthly missionary meet- 
ing was held on the first inst. The stu- 
dents were well represented and the meet- 
ing was an enjoyable one. Mr. J. D. 
Stehman led the meeting in an able man- 
ner , giving us an interesting talk. The 
r ^st of the program reads as follows : 

Address.— *' Relation of Christian Col- 
fges to Christian Missions," Miss Kel- 
ler. 

Address.— " Work at Shanghai, West 
Africa," H. H. Hoy. 

Reading.—" Questions and Answers 
0Q Japan," Miss Hartz. 

Address.— " The Missionary of To- 
H. H. Heberly. 
^ we are very glad to say that " College 

a y " was rigidly observed at school and 
We f eel confident that great good will re- 



sult from the addresses and prayers which 
were offered not only here at college but 
also throughout the church. The regu- 
lar studies were dispensed with and serv- 
ices were held in the chapel in the morn- 
ing and afternoon. The morning exer- 
cises were opened by President Bierman, 
who appealed very strongly to the stu- 
dents that if they could not give of their 
means their prayers were needed. Rev. 
Mumma followed with an address, the 
theme of which was how the students 
can best advance the interests of the col- 
lege. Rev. Lewars also gave a very en- 
couraging and instructive talk concerning 
colleges, which was greatly appreciated 
by all. Mrs. Bierman gave us a very in- 
teresting talk in conclusion. 

The afternoon exercises were in charge 
of the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A., and 
were enjoyed by all present. The ad- 
dresses by the students were interesting 
and showed the warm affection they have 
for L. V. C. The following was the pro- 
gram as rendered : 

song service;. 

Prayer. 

"How may the student at the College benefit the Col- 
lege?" C B. WiNGERD. 

Song. . 

" How may the student benefit the College during vaca- 
tions?" . W. G. Clippinger. 

Song and Prayer. 

" The influence of Christian Associations in the College. 

Mary Richards. 

Song. 

Closing Prayer. 

Mr. Garman, '96, president of the Y. 
M. C. A. had charge of this service. In 
the evening a meeting was held in the 
U. B. Church and was led by Pres. Bier- 
man. With others, Miss Allis and Prof. 
Good made addresses. 

The second division of Prof. Deaner's 
Rhetorical Class held its public rhetorical 
on Saturday, February 8, in the chapel. 
A good audience greeted the performers, 
who rendered a most pleasing program, 
which speaks for itself: 

Piano Duet— Qui Vive W. Ganz. 

Misses Meyers and A. Kreider. 
INVOCATION 

Piano Solo-2nd Mazurka . . Godard. 

Miss Ruth Mumma. 
The Individual, the Basis of Government, 

John R. Geyer. 
To-day's Privileges not Enjoyed To-morrow, 
* s. Blanche Kephart. 

Vocal Solo-That Old Gavotte . Hammond. 

Miss Mary E. Kreider. 

vhr Two Monetary Systems F- M. Gingrich. 

g^y^GreatStfomgoser. . . Berth, ,C ^Iayer. 
The Need of Better Roads Edwin kreider. 

Trio-Floating on the Breath of Evening, 

Misses Stehman, Black and Kephart. 



4G 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Senior Rhetorical. 

The members of the Senior class ap- 
peared on the rostrum for the last time 
before their formal graduation, as a class, 
on Saturday evening, the 15th of last 
month. These public exercises are grow- 
ing in favor with the citizens of Annville 
and surrounding country, and, in conse- 
quence, the attendance was large. The 
music, furnished under the direction of 
Miss Flint, was of a high order and won the 
unanimous applause of an appreciative 
audience. Words of welcome were spoken 
by President Bierman, and prayer was 
offered by the Rev. Mr. Mumma. 

The first speaker, Miss Ella N. Black, 
chose for her subject " The Armenian 
Massacres. ' ' After briefly recounting the 
history of these devoted Christian people 
and enumerating the fiendish outrages to 
which they are subjected by the followers 
of Islam, she boldly took the position that 
the Turk must go, and that it becomes 
the duty of the four great nations of 
Europe to solve this problem at once, and 
thus terminate the hellish deeds of the 
"sick man." This oration was followed 
by a dissertation on "It Stands the Test," 
by Mr. Sheridan Garman. No system of 
belief, no rule of action, no theory in pol- 
itics or principle in philosophy, was ever 
put to a severer test and-came out of the 
contest more triumphantly than the re- 
ligion of Jesus Christ. Galileo may ab- 
jure his belief and live, but Jerome of 
Prague and John Huss rather die at the 
stake, and the Armenian Christians suffer 
untold misery and death rather than re- 
nounce fath in their Divine Master. 

Mr. H. H. Heberly took for his theme 
"Partyism," and argued that, in its best 
sense, partyism is commendable. Its 
spirit engenders loyalty in the subject, 
patriotism in the citizen, love for home 
in the child, and devotion to God in re- 
ligion. He was followed by Miss Bertha 
Mumma on the subject of " Over the Alps 
Hies Thy Italy." After naming many of 
the dangers incident to the crossing of 
this historic range of mountains and the 
great satisfaction that comes to all who 
have accomplished the difficult journey, 
a parallel was drawn in human life and 
the comfort that comes to him who has 
successfully subdued evil inclinations, bad 
habits, and has overcome many objective 
opposing elements in life. 

The Mexican War" was discussed by 
Mr. Charles H. Sleichter. The causes 



leading to it and leading battles fought 
were considered, and the preparatory drill 
it afforded the United States soldiers for 
successful warfare during the late re- 
bellion. He was followed by an oration 
on " The Cuban Problem" by Miss Bs- 
telle Stehman. A brief sketch of the set- 
tlement and early history of the island 
was given, its physical and commercial 
advantages discussed, and its ultimate in- 
dependence predicted. While the present 
course of the insurgents cannot be justi- 
fied in many respects, to us, as Ameri- 
cans, it would no doubt be a source of 
gratification to see the last vestige of 
monarchial rule disappear from our hem- 
isphere and see Cuba free. 

The orations and dissertation were ex- 
pressed in vigorous English and were 
well delivered, and the speakers held the 
undivided attention of the large audi- 
ence present to the end. 

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THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



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Volume IX. 



Number 4. 



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THE 



College Foruh 



APRIL, 1896. 



. CONTENTS: • 



|NG ' Quatrains, . 49 

Pyramids of America, 49-51 

It Stands the Test 51, 52 

^ The Individual, the Basis of Government, 52-54 

A) I Tl ie Future of Our Country, .... .54, 55 
I True « Party ism,". . .......... 55, 56 

^ Are You One of Them ? • 56 

Editorial Staff, 57 



Editorials, 57, 58 

Philokosmian Literary Society, 58 

Kalozetean Literary Society, 58 

Clionian Literary Society, 58 

In a Literary Way, • ?? 

Personals and Locals, 

Advertisements, 



60, 61 
62-64 



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Vol. IX. No. 4. 



ANNVILLE, PA., APRIL, 1896. 



Whole No. 90. 



Quatrains. 

HEREDITY. 

Life is a father ; 

Death is his child. 
If life is a storm, 

Death is as wild. 

SYMPATHY. 

I speak to her. She smiles return. 

Her heart and mine, each bends and becks 
To soothing music, angel-wrought, 
Whose fabric not a discord flecks. 
Norman Colestock Schlicter, '97- 



Pyramids of America. 

Whenever one hears the word pyramid 
he imagines himself standing in the val- 
of the Nile, close where the ancient 
_'ty of Memphis once stood, beholding 
re as he does the wonderful works of 
e IV. dynasty, which are a marvel to 
e whole world. 
However, one must not think that 
gypt was the only country whose kings 
uilt pyramids. Other countries have 
had their kings who immortalized their 
n ames and those of their countries by 
building pyramids which rival those of 
Ghizeh, both from a technical and ses- 
tnetical point of view. 

The Egyptian kings spent their time 
an d squandered their wealth in building 
Pyramids that were a benefit to no one. 
ihe kings of other countries, and espec- 
la % those of America, employed their 
jjtoe and used all their means in erecting 
Pyramids that are a blessing to us as they 
na vebeen to all mankind, 
uf the pyramids of America but one is 
omplete ; the others are in the process 
j instruction. Of the latter we will 
*P\y notice some of the things that 
Pe ^mto them. 
- Ane first object that comes into view 



Wri* a stran S er approaches this land of 
sky ° m ' w nere many a time the midnight 



Wa s reddened with the blood of the 



tomahawk, but is now changed into a 
golden vault, beneath which peace and 
happiness rule and reign, is the pyramid 
of Liberty. 

Throughout the whole period of inde- 
pendence, two hundred and eighty thou- 
sand men labored, with sword in hand 
and muskets at their shoulders, to lay its 
deepest foundation. 

When our forefathers began this work 
England had hopes that she could pre- 
vent them from carrying out their designs. 
But when the bell that hung in the spire 
of old Independence Hall opened its 
mouth and sang in tones most sweet the 
song of the Colonies, which reverberated 
over land and sea, so that even kings and 
queens descended from their thrones and 
did obeisance, this blasted the hopes of 
England. 

As on a bright summer's morning the 
sun appears in the realms of the sky, 
wiping away the tears of the weeping 
trees in the dewy morn, so, when the 
commissioners of the king passed through 
the gates of England to enter the portals 
of France, many a tear was wiped from a 
mother's cheek ; many a man who labored 
so that he sweat blood, was relieved from 
the intense strain, and the mouths of the 
cannons and muskets were muzzled once 
more. Peace was restored, but the foun- 
dation was laid in a trench of blood. 

The work proceeded rapidly until 
twenty-two layers were placed upon it, 
when the work was checked for two 
years. 

After the hindrance was removed thirty 
more layers were added, then the work 
went slowly for a time. It was now com- 
plete with the exception of one stone, 
which was to crown the summit. Two 
million men labored four and one-half 
vears to lay this stone in its proper place 

This stone was the most important 
stone of all. On it depended the brother- 
hood, prosperity and future existence of 
our country; the freedom, and enlight- 



50 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



ment of a race and nation which other- 
wise would have been forever debarred 
from enjoying the precious fruits of civili- 
zation. 

While looking at this pyramid we no- 
tice many inscriptions, one of which es- 
pecially excites our attention : All men 
born free and equal in connection with 
life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness 
is what is written there in blood in great 
characters, not only in three languages 
like the Rosetta and Behistun inscription, 
but in all the languages of the world. 

While looking at this pyramid we need 
but slightly turn our eyes to see the 
pyramid of education. The foundation 
of this pyramid was laid over two and 
one-half centuries ago. 

Some of the first schools were in Massa- 
chusetts, New York and Virginia. 
Hardly any progress was made before the 
real War of Independence was fought. 
During these wars men were born who 
proved to be statesmen and tradesmen, 
professional and scientific men, scholars 
and authors, yea, even reformers. 

All our modern systems of education, 
either originated or have been reorganized 
since that time. The college curriculum 
was improved by adding new depart- 
ments. Many academies and colleges 
were founded. Congress removed the 
danger which threatened the colleges 
throughout the various States by means 
of land grants. These total land-grants, 
made by Congress to the various States 
for educational purposes, up to the year 
1876, amounted to eighty million acres 
or one hundred and twenty-five thousand 
square miles, a land area greater than 
Great Britain and Ireland. 

Our public school system dates back to 
the earlier part of the seventeenth cen- 
tury. Brooklyn is said to have had the 
first public school, also to have levied and 
collected the first school tax, which 
amounted to four pounds. 

Public schools, however, did not gain 
much prominence until the time men- 
tioned, but ever since that time the 
system has undergone great improve- 
ments, and even at the present day is in 
an imperfect condition. 

In tracing the education of a man at 
the present day, it is somewhat analogous 
to the perspective mode of drawing as 
employed by the ancient Egyptians, 
where we see several artists employed in 
one picture. The first one draws squares, 



upon which he traces an outline of the 
desired figure ; the second corrects and 
improves it ; then comes the sculptor 
with his chisel and his tools ; finally the 
most skilful artist comes and lays upon 
it the prescribed colors. 

The first artist in this perspective 
drawing of education is the mother, who 
upon the easily-molded infant rniud im- 
prints an outline of the desired figure of 
her child's character; then come the 
public schools, who correct and improve 
that figure ; after the public schools 
comes the sculptor, which is the college, 
who with the chisel of science, art and 
philosophy and other tools give that 
figure quite a different form ; finally 
comes the most skilful artist of all, the 
professional school one enters after he has 
completed the college curriculum, that 
then lays on all the prescribed colors and 
makes the young man a complete, well- 
rounded statue. 

Next to the pyramid of education 
stands the pyramid of literature. This 
is a hexagonal pyramid facing the six 
cardinal points of the literary world, and 
is as far from completion as it ever was. 

Even as the river Nile when it over- 
flows its banks deposits not only good 
soil, but mingles with it some that is not 
as productive, so the authors of America 
have irrigated our land with the very 
best and with the very worst kind of lit- 
erature. Notwithstanding, America can 
boast of some fine literary productions 
and bids fair a worthy rival of the classic 
world. 

When mother earth begins to tremble, 
and a rustling reaches our ears from tne 
distant winds that are drawing near, an 
thick, dark clouds roll in fury over tne 
mountain tops, then we know that to 
angry steed of nature is appearing 
of whose nostrils proceed heat and Br - 
and which tramples all things beneaiu 
her in her course, leaving nothing bm 
struction and dismay to mark her gl° ow 
path. , tjgj 

Likewise, in the literary world, w 
the mother of pure thought and w» 
begins to tremble, and a rustling re* 
our ears from the fetid wind of P r f^/ a . 
and thick, dark clouds of corrupt n flf 
ture roll in fury over the mountain 
evil, we know that the angry steea " q{ 
pure literature is approaching Jg f 
whose nostrils proceed all the . ^ 
fiction, trampling beneath her all 




THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



51 



ive 
ols 

ft 
,nd 
lat 
lly 
the 
las 
bat 
ind 
ell- 
ion 
'his 
six j 
ind 
/as. 
m- 
ood 
not 
rica 
-ery 
lit- 
can 
ions 
ssic 

ble, 
the 
and 
the 
the 
out 
fire, 
eath 
t de- 



doff 
cbes 

iity. 

tera- 
is o f 

it 

Is ol 
ling 5 



within her reach, leaving nothing to 
mark her gloomy path but a ruined gen- 
eration of young men and women. 

Time will permit us only to take a 
glimpse at one more pyramid. This is 
the pyramid of religion, and it is peculiar 
from all the rest. In the other pyramids 
masses of freedom and instruction were 
placed in layers one upon another, each 
layer receding from the last, and the 
whole rising in steps until a single stone 
crowns the summit, while in this pyramid 
masses of devout and pure ethical princi- 
ples are placed in layers one upon the 
other, each projecting from the last. 

The next layer, however, will recede 
from the last, because it is impossible to 
continue building any longer in this man- 
ner, since religion is represented in all 
the different countries ; therefore, the 
work must begin to come to a close. 

And what a glorious day that will be 
when the stone will be laid in its place 
which is to crown the summit ! Rivers 
will be checked in their flow ; the hills 
and the forests shall break from silence 
into song ; the burning lights of day and 
night shall be extinguished, and all good 
men who have lived shall rise and behold 
the work they desired to see completed. 

Since we have now in imagination seen 
four of the pyramids of America, standing 
in the valley of thought, scaling the at- 
mosphere of justice and reason, and have 
breathed of the fragrant air of liberty, 
intelligence and Christianity which pre- 
dominate in this land of freedom, can we 
n ot then say that the kingly patriots of 
America have built for themselves monu- 
me nts which will survive unblemished 
a ges after those of the Egyptians are cov- 
er ed with the debris of centuries ? 

Jacob Zerbe, '98. 

It Stands the Test. 

No theory, rule nor any belief is accept- 
ed until it has passed through some test. 

Man is not ready to accept the opinion 
j anyone until every doubt has been re- 
moved. 

Scholarly men wrought out many 
d . e °nes in science and philosophy to be 

scarded later by moie mature minds. 

Uncertainty brings dissatisfaction and 

tll Satl sfaction leads to research, until 

found 1S - somet hing on which to rest a 

Wk atlon • T his is true now and al way s 
be en true, both in Church and State. 



Long before the Christian era much 
anxiety filled and disturbed the minds of 
many relative to the prevailing beliefs of 
that time. 

A constant longing for a revelation led 
many learned men to believe that there 
must be something in man that would 
live even after death. Gods of wood and 
stone were renounced, since they were 
unable to reveal anything. 

The people wanted a God that would 
measure up to their ideal. ' 

They would have a God that could 
lift them above their present sphere — a 
living, moving deity, able to sympathize 
and enlighten. 

Those were times of sorrow, when hu- 
man life was sacrificed to appease the 
supposed wrath of a God made with 
hands. 

Out from this great darkness a vague 
longing arose for something better ; for a 
religion that would protect and not de- 
stroy ; for a God that would be for every- 
one, whether in lowly cottage or in 
palace hall. 

The teachings of men were tested 
severely, but were found to be sadly want- 
ing- 

Darkness fell as a mantle shutting out 
every ray of light, but when hope was 
dying in the heart of degraded humanity 
a great light appeared suddenly on the 
eastern horizon. The day spring of earth 
had dawned upon a brightened race, and 
peace, good- will, was heralded from the 
skies, reverberating over the hills of Pales- 
tine. 

One had now come who would be able 
to satisfy every claim. The eyes of the 
blind were to be made to see. The ears 
of the deaf were to be unstopped. 

The poor beggar would be healed of 
every ill and those who walked in dark- 
ness would now walk in the pure light 
of the Gospel. 

A great teacher had come who would 
teach as never man taught and he would 
open up the way of Life to every one that 
would inquire. 

He would make clear all mystery and 
every direction so plain that he who 
mieht run could read. 

When Christ began his work we learn 
that to all classes his words were clear. 
To the poor and unlearned His teaching 
was so simple, yet so effective that no one 
went away in error or m doubt. 

The poor Samaritan woman saw her 



52 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



true condition after a few questions care- 
fully aimed within her comprehension. 

There was no philosophy for her to 
reason out, for that would have been an 
impossibility, but she heard the plain 
truth which she fully understood. 

The rich ruler who came by night did 
not fail to find in Christ a Master, al- 
though well versed in the laws and teach- 
ings of men, yet He was sorely puzzled 
when told what He must do to inherit 
eternal life. 

Nicodemus had come to test the doc- 
trines of Christ and He found full satis- 
faction, for we read that after this He 
stood up before His own people and at- 
tested to the power of Christ's teachings, 
but a greater test was coming which 
should prove to the world that Christ in- 
deed had divine power even over death. 
He had already foretold His death and 
resurrection which brought exceeding 
sorrow to His disciples. They did not 
doubt that He would die, but they 
thought it impossible for Him to rise from 
the dead, even though they had seen His 
power manifested in performing miracles. 
A resurrection was necessary for upon it 
depended the completion and perfection 
of the wonderful plan for which He came 
into the world. 

Upon this depended the future of 
Christianity and upon this our future 
hopes were balanced. 

Almost intolerable was the suspense of 
those three days preceding the resur- 
rection. Those prophetic words of Christ 
must be confirmed. 

He was no Saviour while lying in the 
tomb, but the morning of the third day 
beheld the most triumphant victory ever 
recorded in human history. 

A victory that decided one of the most 
momentous questions. The bonds of 
death were broken and Christ walked 
forth in the beauty of a risen Lord, and 
millions of souls were set free from sin's 
enslavement. 

More than eighteen hundred years have 
passed, yet the doctrines of Christ as 
taught by His disciples stand as firm as 
upon the day when the all-wise Teacher 
finished His great work. 

The most profound mind has never 
been able to frame anything better or can- 
not measure the length or breadth of the 
glorious Gospel. 

Books upon books may be written and 
yet the half will never be told. 



This great citadel of truth stands out 
as a marvel of strength and beauty to 
light the weary traveller homeward. 

It stands the test for the weakest saint 
as well as the greatest leader of Christi- 
anity. 

The martyr goes to the stake or the 
block with no fear when he remembers 
that Christ said, " My grace is sufficient 
for thee." 

Galileo, when put to the test for his 
scientific opinion, abjured his objection- 
able doctrine and saved his life, but John 
Huss or Jerome of Prague did not retract, 
for they had the assurance that they 
would gain a life even in death. The 
great test still goes on even in our pre- 
sent day, but " My word shall never pass 
away" saith the Lord, and our Arme- 
nian brethren suffer death in the most 
shocking manner, for they know as the 
martyrs of old that their cause is right, 
for Christ has begotten them again unto 
a lively hope by his resurrection. 

It stands the test when sorrows and 
trials come. 

All other hopes or beliefs may fall to 
the ground and friends may forsake on 
every hand. 

Nations may rise and decay and king- 
doms be overthrown, but the Kingdom of 
Christ shall ever stand. 

When death comes and the great Time- 
keeper announces that time shall be no 
more, the souls of men shall gather 
around the throne of the Eternal Judge, 
a shout will go up in one mighty chorus 
for Him who has redeemed us and washed 
us white as snow. The dome of heaven 
will ring with praises for the gift of a boo 
and Saviour. j 
The poor and the rich, the learned an" 
the unlearned, the martyrs and all, sna 
stand side bv side in Heaven and sn 
know that all tears and sadness are at 
for Christ said, "Where I am ), 



end, 



the bigb est ' 



shall be also," Hosanna m 

It stands the test. , , 

Sheridan Garman, 9°- 

The Individual, the Basis of Gofe 1 *' 
in en t. r re . 

All men are not equal. History vtf^ 
peat itself, but nature never does. g e 
are no two fiowrets in the garden ^ 
blooming exactly alike. No tw ^ 
when dropped by Divinity from i ^ 
known into time have fallen arnoi e 



Ity 
chi 
vai 
so 
the 
for 
of 
est 

Vl( 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



53 



mt 
iti- 

the 
ers 
en; 

his 
on- 
)hn 
let, 
aey 
rhe 
Me- 
>ass 
me 

lOSt 

the 
?ht, 
into 

and 

.1 to 
; on 

ing- 

tn of 

ime- 
■e no 
ither 
dge, 
orus 
shed 
aven 
Son 



sba" 
shall 
at an 
w f, 
best! 

9 6. 



vern* 

iy re- 

s0 ul- 

e u°' 

icr the 



-arne conditions and developed identical 
characters. Every person differs from 
every other person in some attribute or 

° l Society is constituted of just such be- 
ings. It is a coalescent mass of indi- 
viduals, not a union of units. This is 
clearly demonstrated in its origin. Primi- 
tive man was spherical. There were no 
inequalities on his character. He was 
society. But when the number of men 
increased, a change became necessary. 
Society should preserve its sphericity, 
and, since a number of globes can by no 
combination form a globe, the parts can 
no longer be globular. They must have 
heterogeneous forms. Hence society can- 
not be a crystallized mass, but must be 
one of individual particles. 

Government was instituted for indi- 
vidual benefit. Its highest object is to 
protect the individual. 

Man has from the earliest times asso- 
ciated with his fellows. Perhaps through 
a recognition of the social benefits, doubt- 
less because the Creator foreseeing the 
advantages that would result from the 
companionship with others, placed this 
instinct in him as he did in the lower 
animals. However this is, it is evident 
that his social desire is subordinate to 
that great principle of human nature, 
self-preservation, and by it controlled. 

In earliest history man's laws were in 
him and known through the direct revela- 
tion of God. A transgression involved 
but the criminal and Divinity. But as 
mankind increased in number, individual- 
ity became more prominent, and as the 
characters of some were ruled and culti- 
vated by the evil in them, a few had sunk 
S J far that they violated the rights of 
[heir fellows. Then it became necessary 
lo r society to form rules for the protection 
of its members, and government was 
es tablished for the protection of the indi- 
vidual. 

This then has always been the highest 
%et of the ideal government, yet, like 
U else, civil power has never realized its 
jj eal - But, as the exotic thrives best in 
most nearly natural condition, so 
Canity advances most under those gov- 
idM ents wnicn approach most nearly the 
? , • In this, history furnishes us sev- 
aff j Xam ples. There are no better ones 
°raed for the study of individuals com- 
■ m tized and individualized communi- 



ties 



than in the annals of Greece and 



Rome. Greece was a group of masses of 
individuals united for individual protec- 
tion. Rome was one body segmentized for 
the aggrandizement of the whole. In 
Greece the government was for the benefit 
of the individual; in Rome the individual 
was the property of the state. Grecian 
government was a mother, fostering, pro- 
tecting, cherishing, enervating and ad- 
vancing her citizens. Roman government 
was a monster, sucking like a vampire the 
life-blood from its subjects for the glorifi- 
cation and enlargement of itself. Greece 
as a nation fell. The maternal mission 
of her government having been fulfilled, 
and having brought her sons to self-sus- 
tenance, she expired. Her last blood is 
given for her children. But the Roman 
monster yet bloats itself with its subjects, 
until in its increasing arrogance and un- 
wieldiness it totters. Remedies applied 
can but imperfectly check, yet not alle- 
viate, the leprosy. Rome sank. Then 
from her ashes sprang a greater monster, 
the mother of harlots, master not only of ■ 
the lives and fortunes of her subjects, but 
also of the hearts and destinies of her 
slaves. Greece, too, is not dead. She 
lives in the republic she gave her exist- 
ence as a nation to found. The republic 
of her admirers and followers in every 
corner of the earth. The class of thinkers 
who, not bound by constitution and regu- 
lations, but by the indissoluble tie of 
kindred purpose, are ruled by Nature's 
laws. This is the Greek successor. 

Since it is the primary object of govern- 
ment to preserve the individuality and 
protect the individual, the dream of the 
socialist must remain a dream. That 
communistic vision of a time when the 
miehty head of government will say to 
wealth and genius, "Cast the pearls, so 
nobly won by yourselves and your ances- 
tors before the swine, the rabble who 
have not the power to obtain, much less 
to appreciate them," will never be ma- 
terialized ; for the head can not utter such 
mandates unless the body, that mass of 
individuals, gives breath for this injunc- 
tion, the sale of its birthright. > 

Scenes of Acadian bliss and social 
equality are things of legendary history. 
The world has advanced far beyond them. 
Wouldst thou change the river of twen- 
tieth century humanity, swift flowing, 
fear and mighty, leaving in jt. courg 
the choicest benedictions as it rolls 
steadily onward towards the ocean of the 



54 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



infinite future, for the still, placid, stag- 
nant, pond of primitive society, which no 
current purifies from the obnoxious filth 
constauly arising out of the evil in human 
nature. 

Seek not then, O son of man, to im- 
prove the work of thy God. Learn that 

" All nature is but art unknown to thee ; 
All chance, direction, which thou cans't not see ; 
All discord, harmony, not understood ; 
All partial evil, universal good. ' ' 

Adapt thy ways unto His. Follow His 
laws. Artificially regulated combina- 
tions are ever unstable. The rock of hu- 
manity, struck too often by the hammer 
of thy legislation, will drop to pieces ere 
thou cans' t crystallize it. Thou can'st not 
by laws fix the positions which men 
should hold among one another, for thy 
laws need be as numerous as the indi- 
viduals. Know that the God who ' ' made 
all things beautiful in their season," hath 
provided for this ; and as soon as man is 
left unmolested to follow the inherent 
laws of nature and nature's Director, so 
soon will each find his true position and 
the projections and depressions of his 
character will fit the depressions and pro- 
jections of those of the individuals about 
him as the Divine will has ordained they 
should. John R. Geyer, '98. 



The Future of Our Country. 

Would you know the to-morrow of our 
country ?■ Would you look into the dim 
distance of the future and view her in ex- 
ultant glory or in fallen ruins ? Would 
you follow the stream of human events 
into time unknown ? Then come with us 
and sit at the feet of sages and philoso- 
phers. Go into a half-forgotten past and 
ask a Rome, a Greece or Babylon what 
was the secret of their mighty power and 
what the cause of their destruction. Hav- 
ing done this, we can obtain, perhaps, 
some prophetic view of what our own 
country will be when centuries will have 
rolled by and the history of these great 
nations will be all that is left of them. 

The poet has sung and the philosopher 
has reasoned, but neither has been able to 
tell with exactness the future of any na- 
tion. True, they have succeeded, in a 
measure, in predicting the rise or the fall 
of a nation by judging from its precedents 
in history. So may we, by taking a 
retrospective view of the world's history, 




say with some degree of accuracy w h at 
the American Union will be in after years 

But stop for a moment. Ours is a pe^ 
culiar nation, springing up under peculiar 
circumstances in a peculiar land. We are 
a peculiar people with a peculiar govern- 
ment. Therefore, since conditions exist 
in our country which did not exist in 
other nations, may we not prophesy for 
her a future marked with records -and 
events heretofore unknown ? 

The first footprints of the Pilgrim 
Fathers stamped the principles of liberty 
on our soil and although that freedom has 
been suppressed, yet, like the plant, it 
has continued to grow and manifest its 
peculiar rights and privileges, until to- 
day the common brotherhood of man is 
recognized by our citizens more than ever 
before. True the rights of men have 
been violated and will be violated in com- 
ing years, but that inherent spirit of lib- 
erty, which is implanted within the bosom 
of every human being, will continue to 
assert itself until men will have freed 
themselves from internal vices which 
bind their whole being and drag them 
toward destruction, and it will likewise 
grow in power until the external evils 
which are now causing the heart of the 
nation to bleed will be trodden under 
foot. 

We may safely predict that our 
nation will be called ere long to pass 
through such trying ordeals as will test 
the patriotism of every liberty-loving and 
God-fearing citizen ; for with such ene- 
mies as Mormonism, Socialism, Alcohol- 
ism and Romanism confronting us with 
grinning teeth, there comes a time when 



the great men, yea, and women too, 



ill 



be called upon to suppress them. Do we 
prophesy wars, a revival of by- gone days 
when men sacrificed their life-blood for the 
principles which were near and dear to 
them? Ah, no. The time for wars has 
ceased, and henceforth the conflicts tna 
will be waged will be commanded by 
mighty men of right with pens an 
tongues for swords and noble near JL 
men and women to wield them, r 
still a brighter day is coming— a } ltl e . 
when liberty, political, social and 
ligious will be characteristic of f n .j s . 
without a parallel in the world 's 
tory. It will be an era of P ontic , t : ca l 
dom. Men will not barter their P oll L, e 
rights and sacred honor for worldly 1 
and filthy lucre. Woman will rec 



: 

ds 

is 

C( 

a 

R 

II! 

St 

ai 

C( 



Q 

y 

IS 

it 

ts 
> 
is 
;r 
re 
i- 
b- 
in 
tc 
:d 
:h 
m 
se 
lis 
tie 
er 

ur 

.ss 
;st 
ud 
le- 
ol- 
ith 
en 
•ill 
we 
lys 
:he 
to 
ias 
iat 
by 

iinl 
teu 
3ut 
me 
re- 
era 
iis- 
-ee- 
ical 
ide 
; ive 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



t nroper recognition, and will be granted 
the right of franchise, so that the hand 
hat rocks the destiny of nations in the 
r ' cradle will also vote the destiny of nations 
on election day. I see there in the future 
• a mighty array of women marshalled, by 
t noble heroes, not of military skill or of 
brawny muscle wielding the sword of 
death, but heroes moved by heartbeats 
w hose minds and sympathies are enlisted 
in the cause of right. The future of our 
country will also be marked by social 
freedom. Wealth and family distinction 
will no longer be a mark of rank in society, 
but social inequality will be forgotten in 
the spirit of fellowship that will exist. 
Strikes will be unknown and the differ- 
ences that now seem to exist between 
capital and labor will be found to exist in 
reality between ignorance and intelligence, 
and the former will give place to the lat- 
ter. 

Along with these conditions of freedom 
we will also enjoy religious liberty. The 
dark cloud of religious dissension which 
is casting such a terrible gloom over our 
country, will be dispelled, for ignorance, 
the avowed mother of devotion in the 
Romish Church, will no longer predomi- 
nate, and men will be granted the unre- 
strained privilege of worshipping God in 
accordance with the dictates of their own 
conscience. 

But as we look into this glorious future 
which savors so much of the millenium, 
we cannot but see the peculiarities acting 
a sthe prime causes. A free and univer- 
sal education never before existed in any 
nation, and as it is disseminated in its 
onward course, dispelling the clouds of 
Ignorance and superstition and implant- 
H the principles of right, we can see 
nothing but a prosperous future. But 
ftill a mightier cause than this, and one 
before which even the powers of darkness 
quake, is the marvelous influence of 
Christianity. As the spirit of Christ, the 
Redeemer of the world, is instilled into 
be hearts of men, wrong will give place 
t0 ri ght, egoism will no longer be the up- 
permost feature in men's characters, but 
Jjat altruistic spirit, which alone can 
^ a ke noble patriots, loyal citizens and 
Ta Chris tiaus, will bind us together, 
JJ d then our nation will be the mistress 
the world, but she will show her su- 
Sn rity b y a reserve of her power. 
, w hy all the bloodshed of past years; 
n y such cruel and barbarous wars; why 



55 



the patriotic life of a Washington and the 
martyr's death of a Lincoln and a Garfield, 
if these things have not been a schooling 
for a time when our country will live as 
God's own nation ? Notwithstanding the 
fact that difficulties exist in church, 
society and state, yet we can truly say: — 

We are living, we are dwelling 

In a grand and awful time ; 
In an age on ages telling, 
To be living is sublime. 

But as we peer through the vista of 
coming centuries we can prophesy a time 
for our country when wrongs shall be 
righted, selfishness will be forgotten, and 
our citizens will have beaten their swords 
into plowshares and their spears into 
pruning-hooks. 

W. G. Clippinger, 9 8 - 



True "Partyism." 

Organizations of various description 
have existed from time immemorial. 
Histories of civilization abound in in- 
stances where nations were lifted out of a 
chaotic condition through different organ- 
izations and placed upon bases that won 
the admiration of other nations. Rome 
shall never cease to be recognized as a 
bright example of this kind. From an 
almost insignificant existence, she ad- 
vanced slowly and cautiously until she 
attained that dazzling splendor on which 
poets loved to dwell. . 

But in all these organizations, which 
have advanced civilization, one element 
is essential, which in the end was the real 
cause of success and that is partyism or 
love for party, as the term signifies It is 
not only inherent in political parties as 
the theme might suggest, but also in 
other affiliations of life, as religious belief, 
patriotism and family feeling What is a 
home, but the binding together of the va- 
rious members in it by those invisible 
cords of love that characterize it 

Objections might be made to this state- 
ment by people claiming that such a 
femily love P is wanting in many homes 
Tf the word of God can be taken as wit- 
ness there can be no home in the truest 
seiiseof the word where family love does 

to sing. 



56 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Our very religion is controlled, as it 
were, by party spirit, for the Church could 
not exist were it not for that spirit of 
loyalty which all Christians have toward 
Christ and the Church. There is, how- 
ever, not as much spirit manifested in our 
religious organizations as there might 
and should be. The more party spirit or 
loyalty there is in it, the more good will 
be accomplished. 

Again, what of our nation? It is 
one vast organization of men whose 
bosoms are thrilling with a spirit of 
patriotism that considers life naught com- 
pared with the safety of the flag. Well 
can we boast of our country, and it is 
only through this party spirit manifested 
by each individual patriot that has placed 
the Nation in its present state, namely, 
E Pluribus Unum. 

Could our political parties exist with- 
out party spirit? By no means, as no 
organization can possess any degree of 
permanence without it. Politicians are 
not slow in displaying it and infusing it 
into their hearers, for they are well aware 
of the power that is in it. 

Thus in all these affiliations of life 
there exists a common or rather a fellow 
feeling in the heart of every member in- 
citing him to action. Although this 
spirit of party ism is universal, yet there 
are times when it must be revived, for 
party spirit left to itself becomes as a 
smouldering fire often needing but a 
spark to set the fire burning as brightly 
as ever, but in too many cases it requires 
fire and oil to rekindle it. It is for this 
reason that we at the present time hold 
our numberless family gatherings, politi- 
cal mass meetings, religious conventions 
and patriotic assemblies. It is here that 
partyism is renewed to a very great ex- 
tent. In regard to the home, circum- 
stances often cause different members of 
the family to be scattered over the coun- 
try. They seldom see each other, and 
yet how joyous they become when a 
family reunion is announced and they 
again as one family meet around the 
common hearthstone. Are they not much 
better for the gathering ? Occasions of 
this kind have been productive of so 
much good that there are few families 
who have not adopted it. Political mass 
meetings are not held merely for nomi- 
nating or electing party leaders, but 
rather to stimulate the sense of loyalty to 
party which is so essential to its success. 



There is no doubt but that they accom- 
plish their purpose. Enter a political 
convention of either party and watch the 
people as a popular leader is announced 
A mighty shout wells up from the throats 
of thousands, and enthusiasm runs to such 
a height that men often perform acts of 
which they are afterward heartily 
ashamed. 

Our government also sees the need of 
reviving the spirit of patriotism in the 
hearts of its subjects. We therefore have 
our National holidays which commemo- 
rate the lives and deeds of our noble fore- 
fathers: As these reminiscences are 
brought again and again to our minds we 
cannot help but become infused with a 
spirit similar to that of our dead heroes 
and the more spirit of this kind that is in 
a nation the more loyal will its subjects 
be. 

Last but not least religious partyism 
needs a revival as much if not more than 
these other organizations. All our reli- 
gious gatherings have this end in view. 
The convention held at Boston brought 
with it and aroused such a spirit of en- 
thusiasm for Christian activity as that 
city never saw. A person, having the 
privilege of looking over that vast army 
of Christians as they gathered for services 
with the same object in view, could not 
help but feel that he was in the presence 
of a mighty power. But when they 
raised their voices in song the effect was 
sublime. Hundreds could not contain 
themselves for their feelings and were 
melted in tears. That is partyism in its 
truest and noblest sense. 

H. H. Heberly , '9 6 - 



Are You One of Them ? 

Recently the business manager mailed 
to a number of delinquent subscribers (let- 
ters) notifying them of their arrearage 3 
and requesting a remittance and renewal. 
We are gratified with the hearty response 
with which this request has been m et ' 
but still there are those who have thus 
far failed to respond. Dear reader, are 
you one of them ? If so, may we n? 
hear from you soon in a way that w 
not only fill us with appreciation for > r ° ' 
but will also fill the manager's b a ° 
with that which is so needful for the su> 
tenance of the Forum ? 



Subscribe for the Forum. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



57 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 



THE COLLEGE FORCM is published monthly through- 
out the college year by the Philokosmian Literary Society 
of Lebanon Valley College. 

H. CLAY DEANEtt, '79, Editor-in-Chief. 



ASSISTANT EDITORS. 

H. H. Heberly, '96. Ira E. Albert, '97. 

N. C« Scbxichter, '97. J acob Zerbe, '98. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

H. Clay Deaner, '79, Publisher. 

W. G. Clippinger, '98, Business Manager. 

C. H. Sleichter, '96, Assistant Business Manager. 

Terms: Twenty-five cents a year, five cents per copy. 

THE CO Ij LEGE FORUM will be forwarded to all sub- 
scribers until an order is received for its discontinuance, 
and until all arrearages have been paid. 



Address all business communications to W. G. 
CHppinger, Annville, Pa. 

Address all communications for publication, ex- 
changes, etc., to Box 776, Annville, Pa. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as 
second-class mail matter. 



Editorial. 



Another school term has drawn to a 
close, and how many students can lay 
down their books and say, "We. have 
done our duty, we have done justice to 
the institution, ourselves, and those who 
sent us here." He who can answer in 
the affirmative ought never have any 
occasion to say, " I wish I could live my 
school days over ; I would do better than 
I did.'* 



A "Fraternitas Amicitiae " is a bless- 
ing to any institution. Some fraternities 
do not deserve very much comment, but 
such a brotherhood is worthy of the high- 
es t praise, since it preserves harmony be- 
tween the students and enables them to 
Hove like a great army, where there is 
no enmity, calumny or carping, but each 
is satisfied with his position, to enter the 
contest on the plain of ignorance and be 
Vlc torious in the valley of understanding 
an ^ wisdom. Such a " Fraternitas Ami- 
Cltl *" would be welcomed by most of 
the students of Lebanon Valley College. 



of this very act. Not one hour passes by 
but that we are not changed, and this in 
itself ought to impress upon every one 
the value of time. In studying the lives 
of our great men we find that they did 
not waste any time, but made proper use 
of every moment. A person can but 
once in his life go to school and, there- 
fore, he ought to do his best. The stu- 
dent who does not waste his time in idle 
talk or loafing may, perhaps one day have 
the honor of receiving the same panegyric 
which is sometimes heard of one of our 
greatest statesmen : ' ' Omnes longo post 
se intervallo reliquerit. ' ' 



Lounging in other students' rooms is a 
ad habit, yet many students are guilty 



WE call the special attention of our 
literary readers to the following prize 
offer which appears in the Bachelor oj 
Arts for February : 

The Bachelor of Arts offers to its under- 
graduate subscribers $125 for the best 
original story of college life. 

terms. 

1. Each story must contain not more 
than 4, 000 words. 

2. MSS. must be sent to the Bachelor 
of Arts, 15 Wall Street, New York, 
marked "Prize Contest," before June i, 
1896. 

3. Bach story must be signed with the 
full name of the writer, who must be an 
undergraduate and a subscriber for one 
year to this magazine. 

WE are in receipt of pamphlets from 
the anti-infidel library containing lectures 
and extracts from the writings of H. L. 
Hastings, who is known all over the 
United States and Europe as the great 
lecturer against infidelity. The extracts 
from his reply to Ingersol on " The Mis- 
takes of Moses " abound with overwhelm- 
ing arguments which are convincing evi- 
dences of his ability as a lecturer. WiU 
the Old Book Stand ?" is filled with mas- 
terly arguments and striking illustrations 
which are conclusive evidence < 



58 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



authenticity of the Holy Scriptures. " A 
Famous Young Man" should be read by 
every young man and woman. These 
pamphlets can be had for five cents each 
by addressing H. L. Hastings, 47 Corn- 
hill, Boston. 



Philokosmian Literary Society. 

Esse Quam Videri. 



R. P. Dougherty, Editor. 

If there is one thing in Society work 
that needs emphasis it is earnestness. So 
much is gained by determined effort and 
so much lost by careless negligence, that 
we fail to see the wisdom in despising the 
former and persisting in the latter. Ths 
discomfitures of many and, shall we say, 
failures of some may often be traced to a 
lack of that spirit which insures the ener- 
getic and satisfactory performance of a 
duty. A lack of earnestness presupposes 
disinterestedness. 

There are many ways in which one 
may manifest his interest in the work. 
The noblest and most profitable way is to 
take an active part in all the departments 
of the work, endeavoring, not to shirk as 
much as possible in the performance of a 
duty or self-imposed task, but to use the 
capabilities to the utmost. To get a sub- 
stitute means a loss in the literary train- 
ing to the one who shirks, a gain to the 
one who takes his place. 

Mr. Harry Boyer, '97, joined the Penn- 
sylvania Conference of our Church at its 
recent session in Carlisle. 

Mr. Chas. Sleichter, '96, assisted in the 
spectacular production of the Scottish 
Reformation, under the direction of Mrs. 
H. E. Monroe, in Lebanon, on March 
1 2th and 13th. 



Kalozetean Literary Society. 

Palma Non Sine Pidvere. 



Howard E. Enders, Editor. 

Mr. Geo. M. Haines, of Avon, has be- 
come a member of our society. We wish 
him many happy years among us and 
trust he will be filled with the true Kal- 
ozetean spirit. 

Sheridan Garman, '96, joined the U. 



B. Pennsylvania Conference which m 
in Carlisle during the past month. He 
was assigned to the Fourth and Fifth 
Churches of York, Pa. We wish him 
the best in his new field of labor. He 
will continue his collegiate relations here 
till his graduation in June. 

Brubaker, '99, filled the pulpit of the 
Lutheran Church of Bellegrove recently. 
His sermon was one of merit. 

Howard Enders, '98, was called home 
recently on account of the death of his 
grandfather. He was absent a week. 

Adam Weir enjoyed a pleasant visit to 
his home in Lititz in the early part of the 
month. 



Clionian Literary Society. 



Virtute et fide. 



Ella N. Black, Editor. 

One of the leading events that has eve 
taken place in Clionian circles was the 
Book Reception held on March 13th in the 
College chapel. Many handsome books 
were received, and their character was 
most excellent. They include the works 
of the best poets and novelists, and will 
add much to the library facilities of the 
Society. We thank all of our friends who 
remembered us so kindly. Below is the 
program rendered in the chapel : 

PROGRAM. 

Instrumental Quartet— Grande ValseBrillante, 

\Schulhoff. 

Misses Kephart, Mayer, Myers and Annie Krei- 
der. 

Essay— Hall Caine's Position in Literature R« lrl 

Mumma. 

Recitation— The Sceptic's Daughter . . . Leah C. Hartz. 
Vocal Solo— Beyond the Sunset Gates, Maywood. 

Miss Katharine Mumma. 
Referred Question— Has the Novel of This Century Pro- 
duced More Elevating Influence than That 
of the Eighteenth Century? 
Bessie Kinports. 
Original Story— A Moonlight Reveiie . . . Ella N. Black. 
Instrumental Solo— The Last Idea of Weber, Craumer. 

Miss Ruth Mumma, 
Address— The New Poet Laureate . . . Estelle Stehman. 
Vocal Duet— Love Shall Guide Thee, White- 

Misses Katharine Mumma and Blanche Kephart. 
Discussion— Is Success Attained More Through Individ- 
ual Efforts than Through Fortunate Circumstances? 
Aff.— Florence M. Rock. Neg.— Anna M- Keller- 
Miscellaneous Digest Mary E- Richard- 
Chorus— Joys of Spring, G'ioel. 
Misses Stehman, Annie Kreider, Myers, Batdorf, Bla cK 
and Keller. 

Miss Kreider, '99, took the part of the 
Queen's Lady in the recent production of 
the Scotish Reformation, on March 12 and 
13, in Fisher's Opera House, Lebanon. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



59 



In a Literary Way. 

We have received from the Coin Pub- 
lishing Co., Chicago, 111., "A Tale of 
Two Nations." This is a novel by the 
well-known financial expert, W. H. Har- 
vey, who is the famous author of "Coin's 
Financial School." It is a love story 
that gives the history of demonetization 
and depicts the evil spirit and influences 
that have worked the destruction of 
American prosperity. The price of the 
work is very low : Popular edition, 25 
cents ; in cloth, $1.00. 

From " The American Humane Educa- 
tion Society," 19 Milk Street, Boston, 
comes a book of ' ' Autobiographical 
Sketches," by Geo. T. Angell. The 
book is very interesting throughout and 
is a plain statement of the work of a very 
noble man for the good of humanity. 
The work clearly shows the successive 
growth oOhe above named Society, and 
is invaluable to the friends of charity. 
Although it covers 155 pages and con- 
tains two good portraits of Mr. Angell, it 
is sold for ten cents. 

It has been a long time since anything 
has made such a weird impression upon 
us as The Lotus. But the weirdness is of 
a healthy nature and has moved us to a 
decided appreciation of this compara- 
tively new fortnightly. The Lotus is an 
inter-collegiate magazine and is published 
in Kansas City. Here is what the Boston 
Ideas says: "It is modern in every 
way — in its individuality, its scope, its 
piquancy." It is done artistically in red 
and black on Japan paper by the best 
college authors and artists. The "Liter- 
ary Notes' ' are alone worth its price, five 
cents a copy. We reprint a verse by 
Arthur Caufield : 

We grow like what we love, the poets say. 
0, mighty Cupid ! shall I then some day- 
Grow shorter by a head, have tiny feet 
And beardless lips and bang my hair, I pray ? 

A word or more to the Dayton H. S. 
Times and Philadelphia H. S. Mirror : 
After waiting four months for 'your ex- 
pected visits to our sanctum you have in- 
deed arrived. Now will you not call on 
u s again ? We recognize you as leaders 
a mong the high-school journals of the 
la nd and intimacy with you is much de- 
sired by us. We will make but one ap- 
peal. 

Someone said, " The Mephistophelean 
has come again. " " Indeed, ' ' we replied, 



but could not believe it until it meet our 
editorial gaze. Much change has been 
wrought in this journal, so that it is now 
a very representative periodical for Mer- 
cer College. We feel sure that few 
Southern college monthlys are better 
made. "Among the Magazines" is 
faithfully devoted to general literature 
and college magazine lore is by no means 
sparcely cared for in " Exchanges." 

The February Muhlenberg seems to be 
not quite so strong a number as those 
just preceding it. One article, however, 
is very well done : It is " The Study of 
Music Abroad," by Mr. Opp. The 
writer says Munich is the strongest musi- 
cal center in Germany because Levi, 
Fischer, Strauss and Rheinberger teach 
there. He came very nearly being right. 

The Normal Review, of New Paltz, 
N. Y., is a new exchange. It is a bright 
quarterly and cannot fail of being very 
helpful to the institution it represents. 
Mr. Jones descends to the commonplace 
in his "Ode to Music," and we believe 
unintentionally, when he says : 

We listen to thy gladsome sounds, 
We know " the cat's come back." 

Again the literary ability of woman is 
shown to be of a high order by the Kee 
Mar College Journal, which has first 
come to us with a recent number. It is 
one of the oldest college journals, being 
now in its eighteenth year. There is 
considerable good poetry on its pages, 
but none original. The editorial depart- 
ment is the only exceptionally good one. 
We readily give place to this journal on 
our exchange list. 

With the March number the Gettysburg 
College Monthly begins its fourth volume. 
Although a comparatively new journal, 
it is decidedlv good and reflects credit 
upon its editorial board. "O. W. Holmes 
as the Poet of Collegians," is the leading 
article and, we might add, almost the 
leading article of the month among col- 
lege monthlies generally. We regret that 
this paper does not have more to say about 
college literature and give us good ex- 
change matter. Success to the new vol- 
ume. 

The Bachelor of Arts, the great inter- 
collegiate review, continues to maintain 
its high standard. The February num- 
ber contained much of immediate interest 
to all college men. It is almost needless 
to praise a journal that has regular de- 



60 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



partments in charge of such men as E. S. 
Martin and Walter Camp. The literary 
notes are distinctively American and, 
above all, very just. The critic tells a truth 
in a happy way when he says in reference 
to Thomas Hardy's " Jude, the Obscure " 
that Schopenhauer smiled as he read it 
in Hades the other evening. The price 
of the Bachelor is $3.00 per year. 

The March Nezv Bohemian seems to us 
brighter than any previous issue. The 
poem, " In Benares," is a very able piece 
of work done by Laura Tully and admir- 
ably illustrated by David Swing, Of the 
other poems "The Dead Jester," by 
Jeannie Ewing, is a notable tribute to the 
late " Bill Nye." Mr. Otis contributes a 
very powerful story in "In Bohemia." 
The editorial remarks on Dr. Carlos 
Martyn's work savor of a highly un- 
christian spirit and indeed, aside from 
this, have no proper place in a literary 
magazine. Aside from the editorials this 
journal is strong. Its price is low only 
ten cents a copy. 



Personals and Locals. 

Snow at last ! 

Now for the sleigh rides ! 

Horses don't admire the snow very 
much. 

"Pop" is again kept busy shoveling 
snow and scolding those who throw 
snow balls. 

Student in Roman History — Italy is 
divided into Northern, Central and 
Southern Egypt. 

The Faculty was invited out to a sup- 
per at the home of Dr. and Mrs. C. J. 
Kephart on the 5th inst. 

C H. Sleichter, '96, our famous bass 
singer has been called upon to render his 
assistance in the U. B. church choir. 

Howard Enders, '98, was called home 
suddenly this month to attend the funeral 
of his grandfather. 

We are glad to state that our worthy 
President has met with good success in 
his recent effort to solicit funds for the 
college. 

C. B. Wingerd, '97, was called to fill 
the pulpit of Rev. Rhoads at Pleasant 
Hill U. B. church recently. 

Albert has at last reached his highest 
ambition of wealth. He has gotten 
"Rich." 



Prof. — What can you say concerning 
the rise of Spain ? 

Student — Charles of Aragon married 
Ferdinand of Castile, etc. 

The class in Homer report very inter- 
esting sessions of late, as Prof. Mcbermad 
has given them a number of lectures on 
the subject. His latest lecture was on 
" Qualifiers in Homer." 

Prof. — How would you classify the his- 
tory of Moses under Ancient or Modern 
History ? 

Mr. B.— Under Modern History, of 
course. 

Rev. B. — Must be getting a little ab- 
sent-minded. He recently mistook his 
sleeve for his mouth and emptied a cup 
of hot coffee into it. The mistake was 
discovered in a short time, we can assure 
you. 

The Sunday-school Convention held at 
Lebanon last month was attended by a 
number of students and professors. The 
" Quartette " furnished music for the con- 
vention on the evening of the 27th ult., 
in the St. John's Reformed church. 

The Inter-Society recently appointed a 
committee to select an orator who is to 
speak before the Societies during com 
mencement week of '96. 

The College Forum was ably repre- 
sented at the Pennsylvania Conference 
by our business manager, W. G. Clip- 
pinger, as was shown by the good report 
with which he returned. 

Miss Sleichter, of Harrisburg, visite' 
her brother Charles at college on the 
15th ult., to witness his success in the 
Senior Rhetorical Exercises given the 
same evening. She was accompanied by 
Misses Barton and Amack, fellow teachers 
in the Harrisburg High School. 

Messrs. Clippinger and Wingerd were 
called away to preach on the 16th ult. 
The former preached in Salem U. B. 
church at Lebanon, and the latter at 
Derry. 

The boys were agreeably surprised last 
month by a visit from our former student, 
B. F. Peters. He seemed as jolly as 
ever. Welcome, Benjamin. 

Garman, '96, immediately desired work, 
and was placed in charge of the Fourth 
and Fifth U. B. churches at York. 

Among the applicants examined at the 
Pennsylvania Conference held at Carlisle- 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



61 



Revs. Garman, Boyer and Yoe, of Col- 
lege, were passed satisfactorily. 

A very interesting sociable was given 
at the Ladies Hall on the 29th ult. Var- 
ious games were indulged in, adding 
great interest to the occasion. Refresh- 
ments were also served in abundance. 

The New York Male Quartet, assisted 
by Miss Nichols, scored a success in the 
Chapel on the 21st ult. The members of 
the quartet are all soloists and to say that 
we enjoyed their singing is using mild 
terms indeed. In the blending of voices 
there are few who can excel them. Miss 
Nichols also won the admiration of all 
by her freedom and skill displayed in her 
readings. 

Brubaker was fortunate recently in re- 
ceiving a call from three young ladies, 
Misses Mary Witters, Kate Imhoff and 
Ida O'Neal. They were shown through 
the buildings and expressed their satis- 
faction with everything, especially Mr. B. 

A concert was given in the College 
chapel on the 7th inst, for the benefit of 
the Woman's Missionary Association. 
The talent secured for the occasion were 
the L. V. C. Male Quartette, the Juvenile 
Mandolin Club of Lebanon, and Norman 
C. Schlicter as reciter. 

Miss Allen, Secretary of the College 
Y. W. C. A., spent a few days with our 
ladies at College, giving talks and in- 
struction concerning Y. W. C. A. work 
in general. The girls derived great bene- 
fit from her visit and regretted to see her 
leave. She delivered a very helpful ad- 
dress on Robert Browning before the 
English literature class. 

Mr. and Mrs. Curry were greeted by a 
large and appreciating audience on their 
appearance in the College chapel. Mr. 
Curry by his wonderful knowledge of 
different 1 dialects, and Mrs. Curry in her 
skillful imitation of birds, have won for 
themselves a fame which few have at- 
tained in this line of entertainments. 
They pleased everybody. 

Agents for Building and Loan Associa- 
tions have made their appearance in the 
building recently. They generally strike 
the wrong place when they come here to 
sell shares. Let this be a warning to 
other companies not to send any agents 
here. Money is scarce. 

Princeton is agitating the question of 
a new gymnasium. 



A number of students attended the 
"Story of the \ Scottish Reformation," 
played at Lebanon, under the auspices of 
the Y. P. S. C. E. of the Presbyterian 
church. 

The Clionian Literary Society held a 
book reception on Friday, the 13th inst. 
The programme rendered in connection 
with it was of an exceptionally fine char- 
acter. The number of books presented 
to the Society added greatly to their li- 
brary. 

The public exercises given on the 2 2d 
ult. by Prof. Lehman's Rhetorical Class 
were, as they always are, a success. The 
theme for the occasion was "Our Coun- 
try," with which every oration blended. 
A few Orders were present, who appre- 
ciated the exercises very much. An im- 
mense flag hung over the stage, which in 
itself was an inspiring scene. The pro- 
gram read as follows : 

PROGRAM. 
THEME — OUR COUNTRY. 

Music • • • America. 

Invocation Rev R - K ??r~ 

Music— Flag Without Stain White. 

L V. C. Quartet. 
Our Struggles for Civil Liberty . . • Harry E. Miller. 

Our Natural Advantages Howard E. Enders. 

Our Country's Flag. . J- Asa Light. 

Music— Barbara Fritchie Sloman. 

Estelle Stehman. 

Our Famous Women Mary E. Kreider. 

Opportunities of American Youth Jay W. Yoe. 

Our Famous Statesmen John D. Stehman. 

Music— Eet the Hills and Vales Resound . . . Richards 

1,. V. C Quartet. 
Discussion— Would the Annexation of Canada Be Ad- 
vantageous to Our Country ? 
Aff., John Hunsicker. Neg., J. Fred Isett. 

Our Natural Scenery Florence Rock. 

Music-Sword of Bunker Hill Wallace 

Mary E. Kreider. 
Our Country's Perils ........ Spurgeon C. Rock 

Our Duty to Heathen Nations Anna M. Keller 

The Future of Our Country W. G. CUppinger 

Music— Star Spangled Banner L. \ . C. Quartet. 

The event of the season was the leap- 
year party given by some of the ladies to dif- 
ferent gentlemen students on the 29th ult., 
at Myerstown. The journey was made 
in a trolley car chartered 'for the occasion. 
Although'it was leap year, and although 
the girls had determined to control their 
blood on this occasion, nevertheless, 
blushes mounted to their foreheads as 
they performed those many acts of gal- 
lantry upon which men pride themselves. 
After a grand supper at the Coover Hotel, 
the party returned home happy over their 
evening's experiences, some even hinting 
to the fair ones by their side that practice 
makes perfect. 

An indoor tennis tournament is now in 
progress at Harvard. 



62 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



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63 






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Volume IX. 



Number 5. 



THE 



College Foruh. 



HAY, 1896. 



f CONTENTS: f . 



"Ill Fated Legions of the Mortal Clin," . . 65 

Goethe and Schiller, 65-67 

"Over the Alps Lies Thy Italy," . . . . 67, 68 

An Unsolved Problem, 68-70 

A Leap-Year Adventure, 70-72 

h a Literary Way, 72,77 

Editorial Staff, 73 



Editorials, 

Kalozetean Anniversary, . . 
Philokosmian Literary Society, 
Clionian Literary Society, . . 
Locals and Personals, . . . 

Our Alumni, 

Advertisements, 



Page 

73, 74 

74, 75 
. . 75 
. . 75 
75-77 
. . 77 
78-80 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Vol. IX. No. 5. 



AXXYILLE, PA., MAY, 1896. 



Whole No. 91. 



"Ill-Fated legions of the Mortal Clan." 

The souls that move toward melancholic zone 
Are legions treading in an awful way 
To lands whose hillsides know no light of day ; 

Where winds for lost loves ever sadly moan. 

Here hope lies dead, and on the ruling throne 
Despair is king, who holds as chief delight 
The blackest ether of a moonless night, 

When heart meets heart with only cheerless 
groan. 

Ill-fated legions of the mortal clan, 

Renounce thy quest of death ; reface the sun. 
Relearn the sweetness of the love of man, 

And back to life in rapt'rous riot run, 
Where nymphs of peace thy noble temples fan, 

Ye souls that flee from melancholic dun. 

0'( 



Norman Couestock Schlichter, '97. 



Goethe and Schiller. 



FANNIE A. ALUS. 

The Greeks never asked, "What 
o'clock is it," but "What star is pass- 
ing?" To such a question Germany of 
the 19th century would have given but 
one answer— "The star of Goethe is in 
the ascendent." 

Homer, Shakespeare, Goethe symbolize 
the triple stars whose brilliancy has made 
three countries famous and whose light 
out grows the brighter, viewed through 
jhe telescope of time. Yet each exhibits 
«s own peculiar phase of poetic genius; 
Homer is truly epic; Shakespeare, truly 
dramatic, while the great breadth, as well 
^ s depth, of Goethe's mental vision places 
Qim preeminent among the world's great 
Native minds. 
With an intellect richly versed in all 
les of literature, finely trained and 
-adied in judgment by his study of law 
^science, we find throughout all his 
; rs e that intensely sympathetic touch 
}th nature and that same supreme law 
proportion that characterized Eng- 
great nature poet — Wordsworth, 
'"ted with the same intellectual serenity 
^ willing to await the future verdict of 
n "^ss that they knew was theirs, we 



have in Goethe and Wordsworth two of 
the world's greatest " subjective " poets. 
Although each may have justly been 
called cold and unsympathetic, they 
attained thereby the highest achievement 
of poetic art, for he who would excite 
emotion in another must himself not be 
overcome by emotion. Loss of self-com- 
mand means loss of power. And yet, that 
"Goethe's heart, which few knew, was 
as great as his intellect, which all knew," 
testifies to the warm regard of his per- 
sonal friends. A sensitive, loving heart 
was his, demanding love in return ; easily 
touched and easily healed, since his 
buoyant spirit constantly demanded new 
impressions. Knowing this, we can, per- 
haps, better understand how he gained 
the friendship of so many women and 
why his nature was not more permanently 
affected by his various disappointments. 
Knowing, also, his firm persistence in 
doing what he considered to be right, his 
sense of dignity as seen even in his erect 
bearing, above all, his inner conscious- 
ness that he was born great (as the stars 
had foretold at his birth), we can better 
realize how his truest friendships de- 
manded in others those aspirations to- 
wards the high ideal for which he him- 
self was always striving. In this high 
ideal of life, Goethe and Schiller cemented 
their friendship by a bond unique in all 
history and that remained unbroken until 
Schiller's death. 

Goethe and Schiller ! What a sacred, 
golden link of memory will ever exist be- 
tween these two poet-friends ? The one, 
strong and self-poised, creating the mu- 
sic of harmony ; the other, always impul- 
sive, possessing power over the finest 
harmonies of language, in very truth ' ' a 
high ministering servant at Truth's al- 
tar," and yet until the close of life, an 
idealist in discord with reality. 

In 1786 the dream of Goethe's life 
was realized. For two years he wandered 
through Italy, his whole nature expand- 



66 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



ing under the classic atmosphere that he 
found everywhere about him. 

As a result of his close study of Hel- 
lenic art and culture, there now appeared 
Goethe's three dramatic poems, "Iphige- 
nie auf Tauris," like and yet very unlike 
the real marble finish of a Grecian study; 
"Tasso," an exquisitely wrought poem 
as well as a fine psychological study, and 
" Egmont," warm and glowing with its 
southern radiance of color. 

The Lyrics of Schiller written about 
this time exhibit the same warmth of 
tone and intensity of color which charac- 
terize his later poems. Mark his descrip- 
tion of the lost souls of Tartarus : 

" Faces wearing 
Pain alone, in wild despairing, 
Curse through jaws that open wide ; 
And with haggard eyes forever 
Gaze upon the bridge of Hell's black river, 
Weeping, gaze upon its sullen tide ! 
Ask each other, then, in fearful whispers, 
If not soon the end shall be ? 
The end ?— the sythe of Time is broken ; 
Over them revolves Eternity. 

Through Goethe's influence Schiller 
now obtained the Professorship of History 
in the University of Jena. His popu- 
larity here was unprecedented. Many a 
student, in after years, spoke with loving 
tenderness of Schiller's influence over his 
inner life. What Goethe wrought by 
travel on classic soil, Schiller now accom- 
plished through zealous study and untir- 
ing toil. By the study of Shakespeare, 
Homer and Kant are his poems indicative 
of the heights attained. Who can fail to 
detect the subtle charm that exists in his 
splendid lyric "Die Gotter Griechen- 
lands," as he laments the lost age of 
Gods and God-like men, and that has 
been so unjustly assailed as an attack 
upon Christianity. Here is one stanza : 

" Then of Poesy the veil enchanted 

Sweetly o'er the form of Truth was thrown ; 
To Creation fullest life was granted, 

And from soulless things the spirit shone. 
Nature then, ennobled, elevated, 

To the heart of human love was pressed. . 
All things, to the vision consecrated, 

All things, then, a God confessed ! " 

The constant intercourse of two such 
electric natures as Goethe and Schiller 
could not fail to result in producing such 
world-recognized masterpieces as ' ' Marie 
Stuart," "Die Jungfrau von Orleans," 
and the immortal " Wallenstein " of 
Schiller by the side of " Lehr-jahre " in 
" Wilhelm Meister," and the highly fin- 



ished pastoral epic, " Herman and Doro- 
thea," of Goethe. 

Schiller's last and greatest drama was 
"Wilhelm Tell." Furnished with the 
necessary material by Goethe, who re- 
served for his own use only that beautiful 
description of Sunrise among the Alps, 
as found in the second part of the Faust, 
Schiller's vivid imagination has painted 
the Swiss valleys with purple and gold. 
Though history may have disproved the 
authenticity of its plot, its undying popu- 
larity is assured and exquisite harmony 
of its lyrical verse places it beyond criti- 
cism. Although not in the truest sense 
a poet of the first rank, the sympathetic 
personality of Schiller has touched the 
heart-life of the German people, and 
through his lofty ideals he has uncon- 
sciously raised the nation to a higher 
standard. 

Schiller and Goethe ! With what more 
fitting garland could we crown the mem- 
ory of Schiller than with the immortal 
laurel wreath which Goethe, his best 
friend, has laid beside "The Song of the 
Bell," in these words : 

" For he was ours ! By this proud consciousness 
A spell that shall subdue our lamentation ! 
For with strong step his mind did forward 
press 

To Good, Truth, Beauty, in its pure creation. 
That so the Good shall work increase and 

sway, 

And for the nobleman shall dawn a nooier 

day?" 

What a heart-fraught word is Solitude! 
Alone for twenty-seven years did Goethe 
work out the problem of his life, missing, 
yet never forgetting, the wise counsel and 
stimulating activity of his friend. With- 
drawing from official duties, hencefortli 
Goethe's life was spent in quiet study 
A busy life yet a happy one, for even in ^ 
own day, England, France and Italy vie 
with each other in paying homage to ni 
wonderful genius. Without entering here 
upon what must be reserved for a spec' 



ial 

critical review, viz., the analysis ana 
terpretation of Faust, the one g reatth ^ le 
that seems to be underlying the wno 
characterized as 



drama has been 
continual strife between . 
in Man." From the restless strivings 



1 and Evj 



Faust's early life to the calm serenity 
the closing scenes, run the lines of si , 

in the web oi 



and gold interwoven 
Goethe's own experience. 



And, now, as we leave these rare ir 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



67 



asleep in death but alive forevermore in 
the hearts of men, with Goethe, we can 
say of both, ' ' A genuine and really great 
talent has its greatest happiness in exe- 
cution." 



ca 
m< 

.h 



"Over the Alps Lies Thy Italy." 

Among the many journeys in this 
world there are few which are more diffi- 
cult than the ascent of the Alps. 

Let us for a short time imagine our- 
selves at the top of one of the highest 
peaks of this historic range. 

As we turn and review the path over 
which we have come we find it one great 
succession of difficulties. Here is a great 
mass of earth and rocks over which we 
must climb ; there is a deep abyss which 
must be avoided. At one place the path 
is so narrow that it is only by maintaining 
the utmost calmness and self-possession 
that we avoid making the one fatal misstep 
which would hurl us over the edge to the 
great depths below. Loose rocks and 
pitfalls abound which might bring the 
careless or inexperienced traveler to im- 
mediate destruction. Altogether the as- 
nt is so full of difficulties that compara- 
'vely few attempt to make it. 
But after the toil and danger are over 
hose who have undertaken this journey 
feel amply repaid for all the risks they 
We encountered. Far below them in 
all its beauty lies sunny Italy, where all 
nature seems to be filled with smiles and 
blossoms. 

The great distance only serves to con- 
ceal the little defects and to reveal all the 
hidden beauties of the scene, while the 
elevated position gives a far more ex- 
tended view than would be possible at 
the foot of the mountain. 

Alpine heights lie between you and 
y°ur Italy. They loom upward an al- 
most appalling distance, yet they must 
i* climbed if you would obtain even the 
[east glimpse of the fair region beyond 
them. The scaling of these heights is 
n °t impossible and, though the number 
those who complete this journey is not 

arge, yet it is no uncommon sight to be- 
*j°ld some traveler struggling to obtain 

hat view of which we all at times desire 

catch at least one glimpse. 
Many who begin the ascent of these 
^ l Ps turn again to the lowlands on ac- 

°Unt of the difficulties encountered, and 

l hers are lost on the way because either 



there is no one to guide them or they re- 
fuse to follow the directions of the guide 
provided. 

This journey is generally begun full of 
hope, but as you advance and difficulties 
present themselves a doubt creeps into 
your mind and you wonder if you will 
ever reach the summit and whether when 
you do the reward will be sufficiently 
great to recompense you for the exertions 
made to attain it. Perhaps before these 
doubts are all vanquished you meet the 
baneful influence unintentionally placed 
in your way by a friend who may be 
somewhat indiscreet, and you are thrown 
into one of the many pitfalls of temptation 
which are spread along the way. 

As you rise j^ou find upon passing a 
huge rock that the path now leads along 
the edge of the deep abyss of dispair into 
which you would be hurled by a misstep 
or by another fall such as you have just 
had. Now you take more care as you 
journey along, and the path seems almost 
cleared of its obstacles. Your spirits rise, 
and forgetting how long your journey 
has been, a happy song bursts forth from 
your lips. But suddenly the song is 
hushed, for directly before you misfortunes 
appear in the way. The thoughts of the 
exertions needed to surmount this new 
obstacle almost discourage you, and you 
might be tempted to give up the struggle 
if it were not for the fact that you are not 
very far from the summit. 

The strong hand of hereditary tenden- 
cies may have been upon you all the way, 
striving to force you back, but as you 
move persistently forward its grasp be- 
comes weakened, and now as you near 
the summit its power seems completely 
broken. 

A short distance more and the summit 
is gained. What in the beginning were 
only possibilities are now realities. Your 
toiling completed, you now rest securely 
in the consciousness of the full possession 
of that for which you had been striving. 
You are not disappointed, for the reality 
is far beyond anything you had even 
dared to anticipate, and you feel that you 
have won a degree of respect from your 
fellow men which could not have been 
yours on the broad expanse below. 

As you look back over the way so 
lately trod, you plainly see that the over- 
coming of each new difficulty that pre- 
sented itself was but a means of bringing 
you nearer the desired goal, and you 



68 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



rejoice that you did not return in de- 
spair. 

Before each one. of us are the Alps, and 
over the Alps lies our Italy. Shall we 
be content to wander about in the low- 
lands of commonplace life and allow our 
possibilities to lie dormant, or shall we 
climb the Alps and thus make these pos- 
sibilities glorious realities ? 

Bertha Mumma, '96. 



An Unsolved Problem. 

In all ages men have sought by the 
combination of superior skill and inge- 
nuity to attain those distinct and obvious 
advantages which nature has conferred 
on different animals, by endowing them 
with a peculiar structure and a peculiar 
force of organs. 

The rudest savage learns in his very 
infancy to imitate the swimming of a fish, 
and plays on the surface of the water 
with agility and ease. But an art so con- 
fined in its exercise, and requiring such 
a degreee of bodily exertion, could not 
be considered of much avail. It must 
soon have been perceived the operation 
would be easier by supporting the body 
on some light substance. So the trunk 
of a tree, if used, would bear its rude 
proprietor along without effort, or hol- 
lowed out into a canoe and furnished 
with paddles, would enable him to tra- 
verse a river. 

From this simple construction the step 
was not great to that of a boat or barge, 
impelled by the force of oars. But it was 
a greater advance to fix masts and apply 
sails to the vessel, and thus substitute the 
power of wind for that of human labor. 
Thus has navigation developed and to- 
day, may be fairly regarded as one of the 
sublimest triumphs of human genius, in- 
dustry, courage and perseverance. 

Having by his skill achieved the con- 
quest of the waters that encompass the 
habitable globe, it was natural for man to 
desire likewise the mastery of the air we 
breathe. In all ages, therefore, great 
ingenuity has been expended in efforts at 
flying, all of which have as yet resulted 
in failure, and aerial navigation is to-day 
an unsolved problem. 

It has been found on careful investiga- 
tion into the methods of animal locomo- 
tion and the secrets of animal mechanism 
that the broad, graceful swing of the body 
and tail of the fish ; the hazy glint and 




the hum of the dwarf bird's wing ; the 
powerful wingbeat and the tremendous 
rush of the hawk ; the silent, mysterious, 
steady, spiral motion of the eagles are all 
but the modifications of one common 
method of locomotion. What could that 
method be ? What is the mechanism of 
those wonderful structures ? What are 
the principles of generation, of applica- 
tion, and of utilization of the energies 
produced and thus singularly employed ? 

The albatross lives in the air, sports 
amid the spume and the wildest waves of 
the tempest, circumnavigates the globe 
on his slender wings. The condor soars 
high above the highest peaks of the An- 
des, and traverses thousands of miles of 
mountains and forest. The stork spends 
his summers on the Rhine, his winters on 
the Nile, and must their master, man, 
be satisfied with the victories already 
achieved over nature, and must the com- 
ing race be satisfied with the advantages 
we now enjoy ? 

The vulture is said to fly, at times, at 
the rate of about one hundred miles an 
hour. The wild goose and the swal- 
low, in their migrations, make ninety 
miles an hour, according to Haswell, and 
the carrier pigeon has certainly flown long 
distances at rates of speed ranging from 
sixty to eighty miles an hour, and for 
many hours together. The common crow 
ordinarily lounges across the country at 
the rate of twenty-five or thirty miles an 
hour, the speed of an average railway 
train. 

Man, with all his boasted intelligence, 
knowledge, and ingenuity, has hardly 
made more than a beginning in his en- 
deavor to unveil these secrets of natural 
engineering; but he has made a beginning. 
Formerly men sought to construct flying 
machines in a complete form, at once ca- 
pable of solving the problem, but g r /* dl !' 
ally the conviction came that our 
cal and technical knowledge, and 
practical experiences, are far insufficiei 
to overcome a mechanical task of su 
magnitude without more preliminaries. 

When the balloon was invented it wa 
thought that this great problem of aer ^ 
navigation was fully solved, but 1 
universally known that anything hg &g 
than the air will be carried along by 1 . g 
a log by a stream of water, and for ^ 
simple reason men have dispensed ■ 
the balloon and have been devising ^ 
ing machines heavier than the & ir 



: 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



69 



propelled by machinery combining great 
power with the utmost lightness. 

We have become convinced that human 
flight can not be brought about by one 
single invention, but that it must proceed 
toward its perfection by a gradual devel- 
opment. Accordingly men have on this 
basis applied themselves to experiment on 
the various hindrances to aerial naviga- 
tion, and with mathematical precision 
one difficult)' after another is surmounted. 
After many attempts with various other 
contrivances, attention became mainly 
directed to aeroplanes, or inclined planes 
moved by vertical screws in a horizontal 
direction and maintaining themselves in 
the the air as does a bird when soaring. 

Many experimenters and writers have 
imagined that a successful flying ma- 
chine would have to be propelled by 
wings after the manner of a bird, but later 
research has shown that wings, tail and 
body act to some extent as an aeroplane, 
and that the same instruments are used 
for propulsion and support. But it is 
neither necessaty nor practical to imitate 
the bird too closely, because the aero- 
plane with screw propeller has been found 
very efficient and can be connected di- 
rectly with any motor. So much having 
been established, the next step in the 
problem is : What manner of machinery 
shall be employed in driving the screw 
propeller ? 

You argue that the amount of machin- 
ery necessary for supporting and pro- 
pelling a flying machine will give so 
cumbrous a weight as to make aerial 
navigation impossible, because there is 
n o known bird with a weight of more 
than fifty pounds. 

Your argument may be sound, but may 
w ( e not aspire to fly through the unex- 
ored regions of air, which surrounds 
e globe? Man has constructed ma- 
ines that outrun the fleetest animals 
hich move on land, that swim faster 
than any fish, that excel any living 
feature in size, strength and power; why 
^ a y he not aspire to fly faster and further, 
to carry burdens, and to cross seas and 
Continents more easily and safely than 
l he carrier pigeon, or than the swan or 
*ild goose ? 
Why may he not hope some time to 
°mbine the highest products of his in- 
s 5 n |ive genius in some contrivance which 
Qall enable him to drive his airship a 
Ull dred miles an hour, defying wind or 



storm; or why not learn from the albatross, 
and the condor and the eagle, the secrets 
of flight, and, like them, to soar aloft, 
and above the clouds, to glide hour after 
hour on widespread motionless wings, 
with the speed of the gales that vex the 
earth below, and as far as the wild goose, 
or the carrier pigeon, or the migrating 
eagle can fly; crossing continents and 
oceans as certainty, and even possibly as 
safely, as do railway trains or steamships 
to-day ? 

Machinery has quite recently been con- 
structed that the great problem of me- 
chanical flight will soon be solved, and 
with the aeroplane as the prime factor it 
is surely a thing soon to be seen in reality. 
It is evident that, to attain high speed, 
we must have low resistance and light 
weights, small loads, great power con- 
centrated within the smallest possible 
compass, and the least possible weight 
per horse power. 

Previously, securing a satisfactory 
motor and light, strong machinery was 
regarded as the most difficult problem to 
be solved in obtaining flight, and until 
quite recently no such machinery had 
been constructed capable of sustaining, 
in addition to its own weight, the aero- 
plane or other means of support, the 
supply of fuel and the engineer, but the 
great improvements in the quality of 
metal and the great advances in steam 
engineering have made such achievement 
possible. 

Motors have already been constructed 
that more than fill the demands necessary 
for mechanical flight. Mr. Langley has 
made a steam engine which, without the 
boiler, weighs only six pounds per horse 
power. Mr. Hiram Maxim's engines of 
three hundred horse power weigh, with 
boiler and condenser complete, only 
eight pounds per horse power, while the 
engines alone weigh only two pounds per 
horse power. He considers it practicable 
to build an engine, boiler, condenser, all 
complete, which will weigh only five 
pounds per horse power. 

The question of a suitable motor being 
disposed of, the most important difficul- 
ties remaining are successful alighting 
after flight and a satisfactory method of 
retaining equilibrium during flight. It 
is not probable that these will long re- 
main obstacles in the way of the many 
investigators now interested in the work. 
Mr. Maxim thinks that preserving the 



70 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



equilibrium in a flying machine may be 
attained just as completely as it now is 
by a steamship on the water, or a bicycle 
on the land. Fifteen years marks the 
history of the bicycle as it grew from an 
athlete's means of amusement to a busy 
man's vehicle. Half that time has seen 
the street car displace the horse. Then, 
is it unreasonable to think that before 
many years the flying machine will have 
placed itself by their side as a means of 
transit ? 

Since the perfecting of the airship in 
the near future seems so probable, it is 
certainly not out of place to speculate as 
to what would be its effect on the world. 

It would undoubtedly be used first in 
war for observing the position of the 
enemy and for carrying messages. From 
it explosives could be dropped down upon 
the enemy during an attack, and so de- 
molish their entire camps. 

For scientific research and topographi- 
cal work an airship would be a valuable 
auxiliary. By instantaneous photography 
of the underlying country accurate maps 
could be made and multiplied for circula- 
tion. For carrying messages the airship 
might be useful in the absence or inter- 
ruption of electrical communication. 

Pleasure seekers would find it the most 
agreeable method of travel. Its high 
speed, its universal application, its free- 
dom from the common causes of accident, 
such as snags, washouts, broken rails, 
burnt bridges and collisions, and its clean- 
liness, would combine to make it a popu- 
lar means of transit. 

He who solves the problem and makes 
navigation of the air a success confers 
upon humanity an inestimable benefit, 
and deserves to be ranked with earth's 
greatest benefactors. 

Howard E. Enders. 



A Leap-Year Adventure. 

"I don't believe it," was the mental 
decision of a student who had just list- 
ened to a long eulogy on the courage and 
presence of mind displayed by different 
women. 

"I can't see what possessed the Doctor 
to relate so many fictitious stories about 
this presence of mind. Women never pos- 
sessed it of any account. I must see the 
first lady who ever displayed any in my 
presence." 

Such were the thoughts of Guy Wil- 



lard as he entered the spacious parlor of 
his boarding house one afternoon in 
March. The only occupant of the room 
at the time was his room-mate, Fred 
Burton, who had not attended the noon- 
day lecture given by Doctor Eaton in the 
lecture hall of the University. Fred had 
just finished reading a letter of some 
kind, and immediately jumped up as 
Guy entered, exclaiming : 

"Say, Guy, did you get an invita- 
tion?" 

" Invitation to what ? " answered Guy, 
uninterestedly. 

"Why, the leap-year ball at the 
Academy of Music, of course. I am sur- 
prised that you know nothing about it. 
It has become the talk of the students. 
Most of the boys are almost wild to get 
invitations, but there you stand as un- 
concerned as though I were addressing a 
stone." 

" Well," said Guy, " the truth is I did 
receive an invitation, but consider it of 
such little importance that I shall very 
likely refuse. Women never did interest 
me, as you know, and to dance a whole 
evening with pretended gayety is beyond 
me. I had rather be excused." 

Fred was silent a minute and then 
said, "Pardon me, Guy, but would you 
mind telling me who favored you with 
an invitation ? " 

"Why no," answered Guy, drawing a 
card from his card case and tossing it 
carelesslv to his chum. 

"What!" exclaimed Fred; " did Miss 
Brooks invite you, and you going to re- 
fuse ? You are very foolish to lose such 
a fine opportunity of distinguishing your- 
self as a gallant, to say nothing of win- 
ning the most popular girl in the Univer- 
sity. You are the luckiest fellow ^ 
school and will be heartily envied by 
those seeking her favor daily. Do accept, 
Guy, and I am sure you will not rue it 

"Well," answered Guy, after a shgM 
pause, "to please you, Fred, and yott 
only, I'll accept; but if I am unsociaoie, 
and perhaps a little rude, attribute it w 
my indifference to the fair sex." , 
Quite opposite, however, were the ie e 
" of Violet Brooks, who had reluct- 



in gs 



Violet was 



the 



antly sent the invitation, 
acknowledged belle of the University 
and having in addition command o 
large fortune, she easily retained 
position. Although she stood in the tr 
ranks of society, yet she possessed a k 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



71 



aD d generous nature which is too often 
found wanting in society circles. It was 
at a students' reception that she first met 
Guy Willard, whose dignity and fine 
physique she had often admired. But to 
lead him into an extended conversation 
was the next thing to an impossibility. 
He was politeness itself, but never spoke, 
more than was perfectly necessary. Such 
-onduct was enough to provoke any girl, 
d much more so Violet Brooks. Her 
vident displeasure was noted by most of 
e girls, and as the time of the ball 
as drawing near and decisions were be- 
g made as to the parties who should be 
invited, they dared Violet to send her 
invitation to Guy Willard. She hesi- 
tated, knowing his disposition only too 
well, and still her choice rested with him 
in preference to the ' ' hair-brained 1 ' 
dudes who continually surrounded her in 
society. She yielded and it was with no 
little anxiety that she waited for his 
reply. 

His note of acceptance was a surprise, 
indeed, as she had almost expected some 
formal excuse. Many were the jokes 
she endured within the few days remain- 
ing until the ball. Some asked her if 
she were bringing a stone, while others 
hoped she would not become petrified in 
his presence. To all these remarks Violet 
turned a deaf ear; for she was determined 
to make a final effort to redeem herself 
the eyes of this woman-hater, as he 
as termed. She succeeded, but in an 
ndreamed-of manner. 
The eventful evening came at last, find- 
ng the girls in the midst of preparations 
"or their evening toilet. Had anyone 
sked Violet why those extra touches 
ere given to her person that evening, 
be could hardly have told and yet she 
as surprised at the unusual fluttering 
f her heart as the time for her carriage 
as drawing near. 

" If he would only do us girls justice 
and act as a gentleman ought in society, 
bow proud I would be of his company! 
I am sure we are not as bad as he paints 
us. 

From these gloomy thoughts she was 
abruptly aroused by the announcement 
jbat her carriage, with which she was to 
bring Guy Williard, was waiting. She 
entered, feeling more as if she were going 
to attend a funeral than a brilliant party. 

Meanwhile Guy gave no suspicions of 
his being invited, and most of the students 



were yet in ignorance as to whom Violet 
Brooks had favored. The evening of the 
occasion found Fred in a flurry of excite- 
ment. His tie would' nt fit, cuff buttons 
were lost and everything seemed to be 
going wrong. 

Not so with Guy, who was in his usual 
indifferent mood, taking matters calmly 
and thus being ready in a very short 
time. He was not kept long in suspense 
for a servant soon entered handing him 
a tiny card bearing the name Violet 
Brooks. He smiled a little and then pro- 
ceeded leisurely to the parlor where Violet 
was waiting. She never dreamed it was 
such a task before, as she had often loved 
to keep her gentlemen friends waiting; 
but now she mentally resolved hereafter 
to follow out the golden rule in this one 
thing at least. Guy entered a moment 
later, bowing formally and hoping he had 
not kept her waiting. A chill seemed to 
settle upon them and after a slight inter- 
change of words they proceeded to the 
carriage and were soon rolling down the 
avenue. 

Do what she pleased Violet could not 
get her companion into a spirited conver- 
sation. He answered her in monosyl- 
lables which were anything but encour- 
aging ; and to do ail the talking herselt 
was also out of the question. Before 
much could be said, however, they had 
reached the Academy of Music, where a 
brilliant scene awaited them. They were 
among the last to arrive and they created 
not a little sensation as they took a lead- 
ing position on the stage. Many were the 
admiring glances cast in their direction, 
for Guy was at his best and Violet never 
seemed more beautiful to her friends and 
to Guy also if he would have allowed him- 
self to confess it. They danced superbly, 
but for the pleasure she received from 
it she might as well have danced with a 
statue. He broached a number of sub- 
jects, but she had become so vexed at his 
conduct that she could bear it no longer 
and begged to be excused a few minutes. 

Guy had noticed her displeasure during 
the evening and, wishing to make amends, 
seized this opportunity of being alone 
with her. 

Placing her hand in his arm, he led her 
through an open window upon a balcony 
often used by actors for gaining a little 
fresh air. Had anyone else than Guy 
Willard been with her, Violet would have 
burst into tears with vexation ; but dis- 



72 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



daining to show any weakness in his 
presence, she refrained by a strong effort 
and merely leaned against a post in 
silence. 

Guy took her hand and said, " I am 
afraid you have'nt enjoyed the evening 
very much, Miss Brooks." She inter- 
rupted him by saying in a slightly scorn- 
ful tone, "I hope you enjoyed the evening 
better than I have." " I think," contin- 
ued Guy, not heeding her interruption, 
"that I have been the unwilling cause of 
it, but you must know that I have been 
so little in society of late and am not ac- 
customed to such gay festivities any- 
more. ' ' Not wishing to hear any more, 
she proposed going in and soon after they 
were seen to leave altogether. 

The carriage containing them had al- 
most reached Guy's boarding house when 
the horse, for some cause, sprang sharply 
to the right, overturning the carriage 
with a crash. The occurrence was so sud- 
den that Guy had no opportunity of 
shielding Violet, who was hurled against 
the side of the carriage, producing tem- 
porary unconsciousness. She recovered 
immediately and Guy, in attempting to 
raise her, was struck on the head by the 
shaft of another vehicle which crashed 
into theirs. Although in a dangerous 
position, on account of the frantic horses 
about her, Violet endeavored to revive 
Guy, but this proving fruitless she did 
what only a heroine can do. She tore 
open the back of the carriage, leaped out, 
and then dragged out the apparently life- 
less form of her companion to a place 
of safety. Friends and students soon 
crowded about, one carrying off Guy, 
while another offered to escort Violet to 
her home. After informing the driver of 
her condition she consented to be taken 
home, where she waited in painful sus- 
pense for some news concerning Guy. It 
came in the form of a long note by Guy 
himself. He told her that he had not 
been so far unconscious as not to know 
what was going on about him after he 
was struck in the carriage, although he 
was helpless. 

He expressed his admiration of her 
courage and kindness shown in his be- 
half and of which he was so unworthy. 
His hopes were also expressed that in the 
future he might redeem himself for the 
rudeness he had often shown toward her. 

She smiled as she laid down the mis- 
sive and to say she was happy would be 



quite natural judging from the contente 
expression resting upon her face. "How 
different it has all turned out," she mur- 
mured. 

Guy was soon about again but seemed 
a new man in many respects. He was 
surprised at the tenderness which pos- 
sessed him at the thought of Violet. It 
is needless to say they became warm 
friends and continued thus until their 
graduation, when both left with renewed 
promises of friendship. No one seemed 
surprised when a year later the Univer- 
sity News contained a notice of the bril- 
liant wedding of Mr. Guy Willard and 
Miss Violet Brooks, members of the 
alumni. Guy never forgot the lesson 
he had learned and confesses at last that 
he has found a woman with presence of 
mind. A Student. 



In a Literary Way. 

From H. L,. Hastings, 47 Cornhill, 
Boston, comes a very dainty book for 
which we are extremely grateful. It is 
called ' ' Corruptions of the New Testa- 
ment " and is one of the "Anti-Infidel 
Series," written by its publisher, the 
veteran editor of The Christian. The 
purpose of the author, ' 4 to place within 
the reach of the common people a few 
facts which seem to be overlooked by a 
majority of skeptical objectors to the 
truth of the New Testament," is well 
fulfilled. The price of the book, ninety- 
four pages, in boards, is but 35 cents. 

The Easter number of The Lotus was 
"a marvel of delight." Mr. Trover's 
cover drawing falls little short of being 
the best piece of work this sprightly col- 
lege magazine has yet printed; nor need 
we fear for the fiction of a journal that 
has as a contributor an author like Laura 
Everingham Scammon. The poetry i s 
always good, but we feel like mentioning 
as especially so "An April Rhyme 01 
June," by Mr. Canfield. The Lotus % 
an inter-collegiate semi-monthly literary 
magazine and is indispensable to college 
men. Published at Kansas City for five 
cents a copy, or one dollar a year. 

The April Bachelor of Arts is brimful 
of the best material. W. A Robinson, 
in a seasonable article, describes the 
"Olympian Games at Athens," and Ly- 
man H. Weeks well acquaints us vw» 
" Medieval Student Mobs." These are but 
( Co ft tin ued on page 77.) 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 
EDITORIAL STAFF. 



73 



T HE COLLEGE FORUM is published monthly through- 
tt l,e college year by the Philokosmian Literary Society 
Jf Lebanon Valley College. 

H. CLAY DEANEK, '79, Editor-in-Chief. 

ASSISTANT EDITORS. 

H, H. Heberly, '96. Iba E. Albert, '97. 

{J, 0. SCHLICHTEE, '97. J ACOB ZERBE, '98. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

g, Clay Deaner, '79, Publisher. 

% G. Clifpinger, '98, Business Manager. 

a Sleichter, '96, Assistant Business Manager. 



Terms: Twenty-fire cents a year, five cents per copy. 

THE COLLEGE FORUM will be forwarded to all sub- 
scribers until an order is received for its discontinuance, 
md until all arrearages hav e been paid. 

Address all business communications to W. G. 
Clippinger, Annville, Pa. 

Address all communications for publication, ex- 
changes, etc., to Box 776, Annville, Pa. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as 
second-class mail matter. 



Efcttorial. 



The friends of the College should all 
rejoice at the excellent attendance of this 
term. About thirty-five new students 
have been enrolled. This number makes 
the whole attendance considerably in ad- 
vance of any time for the past five years. 
All the departments are well-filled and 
the work of instruction is being done 
most enthusiastically. 

The article on " Goethe and Schiller" 
in this issue invites careful reading. We 
are also pleased to present a story and 
s ome stanzas by Mr. Dougherty, which 
a re teeming with college patriotism. 

We are now in the midst of the base- 
tall season. The most important ques- 
tion we can direct to each student, new 
0r old, is, "What have you done in sup- 
Port of your College team?" We hope 
you will be able to answer, ' ' I have done 
a U that I could." If you have thus re- 
Plied truly, this is all we can ask. You 
% you want the team to be successful, 
the n prove the strength of your desire by 
Placing a dollar or more into the mana- 
§er 's hands. Besides this show your in- 



terest by your presence at all the games, 
practice and regular. Accept these few 
hints and the white and blue of L. V. C. 
will triumphantly flutter over many a 
diamond. 

The present year is a notable one in 
college circles for the infrequency of col- 
lege rows. The only one of any conse- 
quence has been the uncalled-for demon- 
stration in favor of Cuba by some hot- 
headed Princetonians on March 5th. It 
has been so speedily and certainly frowned 
upon that we do not need to look for any- 
thing like it to occur very soon again. 
We are glad for the orderly spirit that is 
prevailing among the college students of 
our American colleges. It is due largely 
to the diplomacy and good sense of facul- 
ties in dealing with student outbreaks. 
As a result, discipline is becoming less 
rigid and student-honor growing into a 
potent factor in the matter of government. 

• ♦ > 

The faculties of our colleges and uni- 
versities are determined to separate col- 
lege athletics from professional sports. 
What can be more desirable ? Every man 
who has received pay for his services, 
either directly or indirectly, is being ex- 
cluded from playing on college teams. 
The athletic directors of Yale, Harvard, 
Cornell, U. of P. and many more schools, 
are a unit in enforcing the above rule, 
and their action is going to prove a pow- 
erful stimulus to athletics everywhere. 



The spring session has opened and the 
names of many new students have been 
added to the roll, and many of them con- 
template taking a college course. This 
term is the last term of the scholastic 
year, and the school days of many are 
now drawing to a close, and ere long will 
be members of the alumni of Lebanon 
Valley College. We hope that they are 
fully prepared to enter upon life's duties 
and will prove to be useful men in their 
age and generation. 



Y4 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



We want to call your attention to the 
concert to be given in the chapel on May 
7- The Lecture Committee needs your 
help, and we urge you to patronize the 
coming phonographic entertainment. An 
entirely new program will be rendered 
that cannot fail to delight all auditors. 
You will always regret it if you fail to 
spend an evening with Edison s wonder- 
ful talking machine. Remember, Thurs- 
day evening, May 7. 

Lebanon Valley College can be 
proud of its alumni; some have sent three 
and four students to college this term, 
which shows that they are still interested 
in the affairs of their "alma mater." If 
every member of the alumni of this in- 
stitution would do his duty this college 
would have more students and would be 
in a more prosperous condition. We 
hope that those members who are asleep 
ever since they graduated will be awak- 
ened and come out of their fortress of 
solitude and do their duty. 



Kalozetean Anniversary. 

The Kalozetean Literary Society held 
its nineteenth anniversary on Friday 
evening, April 10th. The Kalozeteans 
may rest assured that this effort was one 
of the most successful in the Society's 
history. The rostrum of the chapel was 
decorated with blooming potted plants 
which gave the stage a beautiful and 
unique appearance. A large and appre- 
ciative audience was present to witness 
the anniversary exercises. The weather 
was favorable and at the appointed hour 
tne officers and speakers were ushered in- 
to the chapel amidst the strains of music 
furnished by the Apollo Orchesta, of 
Lebanon. 

After the invocation by Rev. Mr Le- 
wars, of Annville, and another selection of 
music, the usual greetings were extended 
by the President, S. Garman. The fol- 
lowing program was then rendered : 

Waltz— Morning Glory *>„,.,„ 

Oration-The Bible as a Text-Book . '. ' Adam K W e ' 
Orat,on-A,i Unsolved Problem. . . Howard E FnderT 
Overture-Marriage of Figaro. ... . m oz Pr- 

oration- Abraham Lincoln Tnh,, V Q* I 

Grand Operatic Sensation . . .7 ' J " ^^cw 

Ex-Oration-The Nation's Need . .Rev' T T ' Soiniw 
March-Oriental Echoes Re .V/ J koKer|: 



Mr. Wier showed that the Bible is th 
best of all classics, and that it is an J» 
cator is an undeniable fact. The Bible a 
a logical study cannot be excelled and ! 
also a good historical study. The Bible 
is the foundation of all literature; to the 
Bible we are indebted for our knowledge 
of the English language, and no colleee 
curriculum is complete without it. Where 
there is no Bible there are no churches 
nor charitable or educational institutions 
Mr. Wier spoke well and did justice t 
the occasion and Society. 

The oration by Mr. Enders on "An 
Unsolved Problem" was well delivered 
and the speaker deserves much credit 
The production appears on another pa?( 
of the Forum. ^ 6 

The oration by Mr. Stehman on "Abra- 
ham Lincoln" was very good. The 
speaker traced the life of the President 
from his birth to his death in a very ad- 
mirable manner. He described with great 
eloquence the obstacles and trials he en- 
countered and suffered, and closed by 
giving a touching account of his death 
and how it affected the people. 

Rev. J. T. Spangler, after having ex- 
pressed his gratitude of having once more 
the privilege to stand within the classic 
walls of his alma mater at this day of 
good citizenship, gave an able address 
on "The Nation's Need." The follow- 
ing is but a partial outline of what he 
said: "What a nation needs is good 
citizenship; so long as there is good citi- 
zenship a nation will prosper. In the 
affairs of our nation the Almighty was 
always interested, and his hand can be 
traced in all our achievements." Then 
he described the struggle for freedom with 
the idea that liberty was not truly planted 
in our country before the late war. "K 
is true the war is over and past, but 
danger is not over. Our freedom is in 
danger; corporations and democracy are 
changing our country to an aristocracy; 
the corruptions of the ballot box also en- 
danger our freedom. Our public institu- 
tions are in danger; on these depend our 
freedom and the prosperity of our country- 
Law and order are in danger; when 
the law and civic duties are disregarded 
it is a step towards anarchy. Our morality 
is in danger; morality is the mainstay ot 
our government, and as soon as a nation 
is given to immorality it is its own de- 
stroyer. Our religion is in danger; 
malism and skepticism calls our earnes 



T 

I attention; our foe is not without, but he 
' ^ e is right in our midst." The oration was 
delivered as by a Nestor. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



75 



Philokosmian Literary Society. 

Esse Quam Videri. 



R. P. Dougherty, Editor. 

The P. L. S. opened its work for the 
spring term under most favorable and en- 
couraging circumstances. On that occa- 
sion, Friday evening, April 3d, we were 
delighted to have with us friends who not 
long ago labored where we now labor, 
who are doing credit to themselves and 
L. V. C. at other institutions of note and 
whose interest in the welfare of the So- 
ciety has not abated ; friends who are at 
present cooperating with us for a higher 
intellectual and literary excellence among 
the students ; and friends whom we take 
the liberty to call such from their having 
been present at our meeting. The visi- 
tors were as follows : William Kreider, 
'94, senior student in Yale Law school, 
and George Stein, a former student, at 
present pursuing his studies at F. & M. ; 
both spoke with favor of the standing of 
the Society and expressed a satisfactory 
view of its ability to take a prominent 
part in the intercollegiate literary con- 
tests ; John L. Meyer, '93, who spoke 
enthusiastically of the part co-society 
work should have in co-education. 

On the same evening the Clionian Lit- 
erary Society paid us a visit. Of the new 
students, Messrs. Runk, Shive and Crone. 
We ask new students who intend to enter 
upon society work, to consider the merits 
of the P. L. S. 



Clionian Literary Society. 

Virtide et fide. 

Ella N. Black, Editor. 
At a called meeting of the Clionian 
literary Society, on the 16th of March, 
l8 96, the following resolutions were 
adopted : 

Whereas, It has pleased Almighty 
pod in His Providence to take from us our 
Gloved sister Anna Brightbill Harp. 

Therefore, feeling our great loss, we, 
the sorrowing Clionians, 

Resolved, That while we humbly sub- 
mi t to His divine will, yet we deeply 



mourn the loss of a faithful and beloved 
sister, and 

Resolved, That although we feel our 
loss keenly we submit to Him who doeth 
all things well, and also 

Resolved, That we extend our sincerest 
sympathy to the bereaved family, and 
point them to the One who can heal all 
wounded hearts ; and further 

Resolved, That out of respect to her 
memory, our Society hall be draped in 
mourning, and that we, her bereaved sis- 
ters, wear a badge of mourning for thirty 
days, and that a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to the family of the deceased, and 
that they be entered on the minutes of 
the Society, and be published in the COL- 
LEGE Forum and the Annville Journal. 

Ella N. Black, 
Anna M. Keller, 

ESTELLA STEHMAN, 
Committee. 



Locals and Personals. 

Easter bonnets. 
Is my hat straight ? 
Baseball and tennis are again at their 
height. 

What became of Enders' cough medi- 
cine ? Ask Wingerd. 

Several rooms in the North Building 
have been repapered lately and present a 
very pretty appearance. 

It is good to have a motto. Bear uses 
" Bear and for-Bear." 

Our old students who returned from 
their short vacation report very pleasant 
times, while those who remained here 
confess having had a " blue" time. 

A class in Pedagogics has been organ- 
ized this term, and is under the skillful 
instruction of our President. 

W. Beattie, of York, a former student 
and member of the L. V. C. Quartet, 
spent a few days with us lately, on his 
way home from Philadelphia. 

At last our worthy "Divines" have 
devised a plan to exercise their muscles 
as well as their brains, and have organ- 
ized a "Ministerial Baseball Club." 
We wish them success. 

Messrs. Pennypacker, Myers and Galen 
Light, former students, visited the school 
on the 10th ult., chiefly to attend the an- 
niversary of the Kalozetean Literary So- 
ciety. 



76 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



We are sorry to report the narrow 
escape of our worthy College Forum 
manager, W. G. Clippinger. While rid- 
ing a wheel he was run over by a team, 
but escaped with a slight bruise. It was 
the drunken condition of the teamster 
and not Walter's lack of skill in riding 
that caused the accident. 

Miss Flint was very pleasantly sur- 
prised by a visit from her brother-in-law, 
Mr. Wm. Buck, of Boston. They spent 
a week in town making frequent calls at 
the College. He remembered a party of 
students with a delightful trip to Myers- 
town one afternoon. 

Prof. McDermad spent his vacation at 
his home in Gettysburg and extended his 
stay a few days after the new term had 
opened. 

C. H. Sleichter, '96, has had a spell of 
sickness lately and left for home to re- 
cuperate. We are glad to see him in our 
midst again in robust health. 

Miss Musser, of Mountville, accompan- 
ied by the Misses Seltzer, of Lebanon, 
called on Miss Stehman, '96, during last 
month. 

A number of our lady students sang at 
the funeral services of Mrs. Reno Harp. 
The Clio girls are wearing crape, as Mrs. 
Harp was an ex-member of their Society. 

Miss Black, '96, was the guest of her 
class sister, Miss Stehman, during vaca- 
tion at her home at Mountville. She 
speaks very highly of the hospitality of 
which she was the recipient. 

Student. — "Are you going home over 
vacation, Charles?" 

Charles. — " No, I must take care of my 
hearts." 

For a wonder there was no complaining 
when the grades were read last term. All 
seemed satisfied, and the President praised 
the students for their studiousness. 

The Musical Seniors were in a flurry of 
excitement when the day for their exam- 
ination arrived. Nevertheless they all 
passed successfully, and, to show their ap- 
preciation, cremated a lot of music that 
evening on the campus. 

A number of our students attended the 
" Ingathering Day " services in the U. B. 
Church, at Myerstown, on the 12th ult. 
H. H. Heberly, '96, gave a short address 
during the Sunday-school session that 
morning, having been a former member 
of that Sunday-school. 



Sheridan Garman, '96, pastor of the 
Fourth and Fifth U. B. Churches at York, 
had special Easter services in one of his 
churches on the 6th ult. , thus keeping 
him from school for a few days. 

W. G. Clippinger, '98, was called to 
Lebanon on the 12th to deliver an address 
before the " Good Citizenship League" 
meeting which is held every Sunday after- 
noon. Judging from reports the address 
was very good and appreciated very much 
by the select audience. 

I. K. Albert, '97, was at Lebanon re- 
cently in the interests of the Sunday- 
school and Preachers' Convention, to be 
held at Sinking Springs in the near future. 

On Saturday, April 4th, a party com- 
posed of Messrs. Stehman, Schlichter, 
Clippinger, and Misses Kreider, Ruth, 
Mumma and Stehman, had a very pleas- 
ant drive to Myerstown. The day was 
delightful and the drive was greatly en- 
joyed. Miss Flint, her brother-in-law, 
Mr. Buck, of Boston, and his little son 
Malcolm, were also in the party. 

The Messrs. Dougherty and wives, of 
Dallas town, have moved in the large 
home opposite the north building. The 
two gentlemen are now attending school 
in preparation for the ministry. 

The ladies at the hall have opened the 
month of April very auspiciously by play- 
ing a trick on the boys on the 1st inst. 
The tables were all supplied with an 
abundance of " To seem to be ' ' bananas. 
When opened they contained nothing but 
a slip of paper with the words "April 
Fool." It was a sad disappointment to 
some who had left other things untasted 
to enjoy the delicious bananas. 

Miss Cora Quigley, who is taking spe- 
cial work this term preparatory to enter- 
ing Vassar next fall, graduated at -the 
Harrisburg High School on April 24th. 

Rev. J. Alexander Jenkins, formerly 
pastor of the Congregational Church ot 
Mt. Carmel, Pa., has entered the Senior 
Class. He will go from here to Yale. 

Rev. M. M. Weber, of Enders, Pa., 
visited some of the fellows at the time 01 
the Kalozetean anniversary. He intends 
entering college next year. 

The new officers of the Y. M. C. A. f° r 
the ensuing year are: President, Albert- 
'97; Vice-President, Wingerd, '97; Secre- 
tary, Brubaker, 1900, and Treasurer, 
Stehman, '99. 



TEE COLLEGE FORUM. 



77 



The College Male Quartet, assisted by 
C. Schlichter, rendered their program 
of ' ' Poetry and Song ' ' at Pine Grove, 
Shamokin and Mt. Carmel during the 
month. Their terms are low and they 
solicit engagements from churches any- 
where. Write to N. C. Schlichter, man- 
ager, Annville, Pa. 



Our Alumni. 

'73. Miss Sarah Burns, M. A., who 
spent the last seven years in Illinois, 
Kansas and California, teaching in public 
and private schools and visiting places of 
historic and scientific interest, has re- 
cently returned to Pennsylvania, and is 
now comfortably sojourning among 
friends in her old home, Manheim, Lan- 
caster county. 

'78. Harvey E. Thomas, of Boons- 
boro, Md., was recently nominated by the 
Maryland U. B. Conference for delegate 
to the next General Conference, to be 
held in May, 1897. 

'80. Alice J. Eight-Beam, M. A., of 
Lebanon, Pa., is an active worker in the 
W. C. T. U., and is editress of the local 
work. 

'81. Rev. Sylvester K. Wine, A. M., 
until recently Principal of Fostoria Acad- 
emy, Ohio, has returned to Virginia, and 
is now stationed at Staunton as pastor of 
the First U. B. Church of that place. 

'89. Rev. Joseph Dougherty was re- 
cently changed from New Cumberland to 
Baltimore, Md., as pastor of the Franklin 
Street U. B. Church. 

'90. Rev. William H. Kindt, A. M., 
has resigned his position as professor in 
one of the schools in the State of Utah, 
and is now pastor of a congregation of 
the Evangelical Association at Cressona, 
Pa., by appointment of Bishop Bowman. 

V- Rev. Samuel J. Evers, of Yale 
pivinity School, was ordained an elder 
to the U. B. Church by Bishop Castle at 
the recent session of the Maryland Con- 
ference at Hagerstown. 

'92. The sudden and unexpected death 
°f Mrs. Anna E. Brightbill Harp, on the 
horning of the 15th day of March, in the 
jjpme of her father, Samuel H. Bright- 
on, Esq., of this place, cast a gloom over 
tfl e whole town and the bereaved and 
sorrow stricken husband and parents cer- 
tainly have the sympathy of this entire 
immunity. 



'92. Prof. D. Albert Kreider, Ph. D., 
was, at a recent meeting of the corporation, 
elected instructor of physics in Yale Uni- 
versity, New Haven, Conn. Professor 
Kreider is now serving as assistant in 
chemistry in the same institution. 

'92. Prof. Hervin U. Roop, Ph. D., 
until recently professor of Rhetoric and 
English Literature in the Shippensburg 
State Normal School, is now superin- 
tendent of the Sabbath-school Normal 
work of this State. 

'94. Miss Ida E. Bowman and Mrs. 
Mellie Fortenbaugh-Bowman, the former 
from Royersford, and the latter from the 
city of Philadelphia, spent a few days at 
Annville. The death and funeral services 
of Mrs. Brightbill-Harp called them here. 
During their visit they called at the col- 
lege and renewed old acquaintances. 

( Continued from page 72. ) 

In a Literary Way. 

two of the many good pieces of prose 
found in the number. Among the poets 
we notice the names of such reliable au- 
thors as Munkittrick, Scollard and Cur- 
tis May. The interest of all college men 
can not fail to center about the well or- 
dered departments of ' ' Athletics' ' and 
" University News. ' ' In the ' ' editorials' ' 
Mr. Clark Smith makes a clever defense 
of Wisconsin University life in reply to 
Hamlin Garland's pessimistic attack upon 
it in his "Rose of Dutcher's Coolly." 
The Bachelor should be in the hands of 
all college men. Published in New York 
at $3.00, yearly subscription. 

The improvement in the New Bohe- 
mian from one issue to the next is so 
marked that not even the hastiest critic 
fails to notice it. The April number is 
undoubtedly the best issue of this enter- 
prising young journal yet published. Dr. 
James Weir, the famous Kentucky story 
writer, contributes a striking ' ' leader ' ' 
in " Mei-Azul." Maude Andrews brings 
the pride-of-the-South poet, Frank E. 
Stanton, very near to her readers in her 
delightful sketch of this interesting fel- 
low. Then there is Cooke's tragic poem, 
"The Anarchist," and a host of other 
bright things in poetry and prose. The 
editorial ' ' warrings ' ' are alone worth the 
low price of the Bohemian, ten cents a 
copy. The May number will be enlarged 
and improved at great expense. 



78 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



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QUMBEKLAND VALLEY" RAILROAD. 

time table-may 20, 1895. 



Down Trains. 



Lv. Winchester 

" Martinsburg . ... 

" Hagerstown 

" Greencastle 

" Mercersburg 

" Chambersburg .. 

" Waynesboro . ... 

" Shippensburg 

" Newville 

" Carlisle 

" Mechanicsburg.. 

Ar. Dillsburg 

" Harrisburg 



Philadelphia.. 

New York 

Baltimore.. ... 



No. 2 No. 4 No. 6 No. 8 No.10 



6 30 
6 51 



7 12 



7 32 

7 50 

8 13 
8 39 



9 00 
P. M. 
1217 

2 33 
12 20 
P. M. 



tA.M. 

7 15 

8 00 

8 43 

9 05 

7 45 
9 30 

8 10 

9 50 
10 08 
10 31 

10 51 
1 00 

11 10 
P. M. 
?3 00 

5 53 
3 10 
P. M. 



tP.M. 



12 20 
12 42 



1 04 
12 00 
1 24 

1 41 

2 05 
2 27 

4 40 
2 45 

P. M. 

5 47 
8 23 

6 15 
P. M. 



tP. M. 

2 40 

3 30 

4 20 

4 53 

2 50 

5 20 

4 00 

5 42 

6 00 
6 25 

6 45 

7 35 
7 02 

P. M. 
11 15 

3 53 
10 40 
P. M. 



9 53 



1014 
10 33 
10 56 
1119 



1140 
A. M. 



7 33 



*Daily. tDaily except Sunday. 

Additional trains will leave Carlisle for Harrisburg daily 
except Sunday at 5.45 a. m., 7.00 a. m.. 12.10 p. m., 3.45 p. m., 
and 6.30 p. in., and from Mechanicsburg at 6.10 a. m., 7.25 
a. m., 9.54 a. m., 12.35 p. m., 1.44 p. m., 4.10 p. m., 5.35 p. m., 
and 6.55 p. m., stopping at Second St., Harrisburg, to let oil 
passengers. 

Nos. 4 and 1 run daily between Harrisburg and Hagerstown. 

I On Sundays No. 4 arrives Baltimore 4.20 p. m., Philadel- 
phia 5.47 p. m., New York 8.23 p. m 

Through coach from Hagerstown to Philadelphia on train 
No. 4. 



Up Trains. 



Lv. Baltimore 

" New York .. .. 
" Philadelphia.. 



" Harrisburg 

" Dillsburg 

" Mechanicsburg. 

" Carlisle 

" Newville 

" Shippensburg.... 

" Waynesboro 

" Chambersburg.. 

" Mercersburg 

" Greencastle 

" Hagerstown 

" Martinsburg 

Ar. Winchester 



No. 1 No. 3 No 5 No. 7 



fP. M. 
11 50 
8 00 
11 20 

A. M. 

4 45 



5 04 
5 25 

5 49 

6 08 



6 32 



6 54 
717 



A.M. 

4 55 
12 15 

4 30 
A. M. 

7 55 

7 35 

8 15 

8 36 

9 00 
9 18 

10 35 
9 45 

11 05 
10 06 

10 35 

11 16 

12 05 
noon 



tA. M. 

8 53 



8 50 

P. M. 

12 10 

9 30 
12 30 
12 53 

1 17 

1 38 
3 00 

2 05 
5 38 
2 26 
250 



tA.M. 
1140 
9 30 
li 25 
P. M. 

3 45 
1 20 

4 07 
4 27 

4 51 

5 10 

6 10 
5 35 



5 55 

6 25 

7 07 
7 55 

P. M. 



No. 9 

*p M. 

4 40 
200 
4 40 
P.M. 
810 
510 
8 29 
850 
910 
928 



9 50 



10 09 
10 30 



*Daily. 



tDaily except Sunday. 



p. M- 



xcept 



Additional local trains will leave Harrisburg daily. e»- - 
Sunday, for Carlisle and intermediate stations at m", 
2.25 p. m., 3.40 p. m., 5.20 p. m., 6.20 p. m., and 10.66 
also for Mechanicsburg and intermediate stations M t jrz£i 
m., 11.20 a. m. All of the above trains will stop at 
St., Harrisburg, to take on passengers. _ T „ PS town. 

Nos. 3 and 9 run daily between Harrisburg and Hagerei 
Through coach from Philadelphia to Hagerstown on «" 
Nos. sud 9. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 






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Number 6. 



THE 



College FoRun. 



JUNE, 1896. 



. .f CONTENTS : f • 



PAGB 

June Lyric, 

A College Song, 81 

International Arbitration, 81-83 

Monuments of Slave Labor, 83 " 85 

Gustavus Adolpbus, 85 > 86 

Editorial Staff, 87 

Editorials, 87 

"Beside the Bonnie Brier Busb," . . . .88,89 



Our Alumni, 89 > 90 

Personals and Locals, 90 > 91 

Philokosmian Literary Society, 91,92 

Baseball, 92 

In a Literary Way, 92 > 93 

Commencement Week, 93 

Advertisements, 94-9& 



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THE COLLEGE EORUM. 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Vol. IX. Xo. 6. 



AXXVILLE, PA., JUXE, 1896. 



Whole Xo. 92. 



June lyric. 

O sing to me, robin, 
Sweet bird of the wood, 

Of June with, thy nestlings, 
And life that is good. 

O sing to me, robin, 
Of bliss and of blue, 

Of June all emblazoned 
To fanciful hue. 

O carol the message. 
Clear up to the skies, 

That June is the harbor 
Of happiest eyes. 

The matron of blessing, 
The nurse of delight, 

The lover of sunshine, 
And stars, in the night. 

Betrothed of music, 
The patron of bloom, 

With frownings on sorrow, 
A stranger to gloom. 

The mother of summer 

The child of the spring, 
Remember, sweet sister, 
Her praises to sing. 
Norman Coeestock Schuchter, 



'97- 



A College Song. 

[Tune ; America] 

True loyalty's homage 
To thee, my dear college, 

Freely I bring ; 
Let all who know her cause 
In humble reverence pause, 
And wide with loud applause 

Her praises sing. 
Within thy classic walls, 
In thy secluded halls 

I love to be ; 
There I find friendship true, 
There true-worth's meeds accrue, 
There we our minds endue 

With energy. 
No beauty lacks thy site, 
Nature and art unite 

To make thee fair ; 
Ne'er may this sacred spot 
Which liberty begot 
Be in men's minds forgot ; 

Its worth declare. 
Let ages roll their course, 
Let men time reenforce 



In his swift flight ; 
But may prosperity 
Ever thy portion be, 
Thy power for good mighty 

Thy pathway bright. 
When troubles, grave, appear, 
Then Thou, our God, be near 

In majesty ; 
Wield thou thy mighty arm 
To shield us from all harm, 
Our foes, then, all disarm 

Of potenty. 
Raymond P. Dougherty, '97. 



International Arbitration. 

The question whether or not we shall 
have a permanent Board of Arbitration to 
settle all disputes which may arise be- 
tween the two greatest nations on the 
globe, is one which has been agitated 
with the greatest enthusiasm in both 
countries for some years. And what 
question could be worthy of a more 
thoughtful consideration ? In the heart 
of every civilized and enlightened man is 
a desire for peace, and in almost every 
case an abhorrence of war and its conse- 
quences. 

The advance of art, science, literature 
and the mechanical industries marks the 
progress of a nation. War hinders this 
progress in every instance. It is a bung- 
ling and unscientific method of adjusting 
difficulties, is a remnant of barbarism and 
ought long since to have been consigned 
to the relics of the dark ages. Napoleon, 
himself, called it an organized barbarism. 
The pretty things have been said for the 
most part by poets, who had no part in it. 
The worst things have been said by the 
soldiers and even by the most successful 
generals themselves. 

Four years of war in America and a 
million dead— and all their own country- 
men—have made Americans realize more 
than ever before the full significance of 
the term. 

The old saying, that the best way to 
preserve peace is to prepare for war, seems 



82 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



to the intelligent American much like an 
expression made by a boy in an essay on 
pins, when he said that pins had saved 
the lives of a great many people by not 
swallowing them. His sentence may 
have been a little ambiguous, but the 
point remains. 

Some years ago, and not so many 
either, when a dispute arose between in- 
dividuals, it was thought that the only 
honorable thing to do, was for the one to 
challenge the other to fight a duel under 
the pretext that "might makes right." 
The cause of the winner was the cause to 
be respected. He was lauded far and 
wide, but few were the sympathizers 
with the one defeated. These practices 
were followed not only among barbarous 
or half-civilized races, but among those 
who were considered leaders in govern- 
ment, and even in religion. We can 
all bring illustrious examples to our 
minds. What would we think of a duel 
now between men in high standing? 
" Although it might happen in order to 
decide among the numerous democratic 
candidates for the presidential nomina- 
tion." We have outgrown such barbar- 
ity. Ought it not be so between nations? 
And what nations are half so respon- 
sible for the beginning of this national 
reform as are the two greatest English 
speaking nations, England and America, 
with their schools, and with every advan- 
tage for the highest civilization. 

Would not a permanent Board of Arbi- 
tration between these two great countries 
go far toward insuring peace throughout 
the civilized world, and would they not 
by their example almost compel other 
nations to follow ? Some one has said 
that war between England and America 
could not be patriotism, but murder. The 
late controversy over the Venezuela 
boundary lines has aroused this question 
anew in the hearts of the English as well 
as of the American people. The English 
remember their past conflicts, and we have 
not forgotten, but we still feel the effects 
of our late civil war. A crisis was 
reached in the Venezuela affair, and 
something had to be done or England 
would be engaged in another war. When 
a committee was appointed to arbitrate 
in the matter, the plan seemed so rational, 
and the work was turning out so satis- 
factorily that leaders on both sides of the 
mighty deep began to wonder if some 
permanent machinery could not be ar- 



ranged to settle all disputes which might 
arise, especially between the two leading 
nations of the world. 

When we investigate we find this to be 
no new subject, neither is the plan an 
untried one. Indeed, even in the admin- 
istration of Washington in 1794, a com- 
mittee of arbitration was appointed in 
what was known as the "Jay Treaty," 
and since that time with the exception 
of the war of 18 12, more than twenty 
serious ruptures have been bridged over 
by arbitration. In the case of the Ala- 
bama claims, when the honor of both 
countries seemed at stake, the peaceful 
solution by arbitration proved as som 
one said: " That two great nations, gain 
ing in wisdom and self-control and losing 
nothing in patriotism or self-respect, 
taught the world that the magnitude 
the controversy need not be a bar to its 
peaceful solution." 

In thinking about these things, which 
have been facts of the past, both nation 
began to wonder w T hy we should consider 
it impracticable to use for the next cen 
tury, by agreement, what we have prac 
ticed, almost without exception, for the 
last century, although we can but see 
that in the very agreement in advance is 
where the greatest efficacy of the plan 
lies. 

This seemed an opportune time to 
bring the question before the people. 
Now, before the Venezuelan affair could 
escape from their memories. Accord- 
ingly, enthusiastic meetings have been 
held in Boston, New York, Philadelphia 
and Chicago, as well as in London, 18 
order to ascertain the opinions of promi- 
nent men and women on the subject, In 
February many prominent men ana 
women, of all professions, met in Ne 
York, and those who were not able to be 
present sent letters expressing their sym- 
pathy with the movement. At this meet- 
ing resolutions were passed in favor oj 
arranging some wise, permanent method 
of arbitration between England aaj* 
America, believing that such a step Wil 
ultimately lead to international arbitra 
tion throughout the civilized world. & 
committee was also appointed to atte 2r, 
similar meeting in Philadelphia 01 V e -^ 
ruary 22, and there, also, an enthusiast* 
meeting was held and the question 
arbitration discussed by many pronun e 1 
people. A committee was appointed 
attend a national meeting in Washing 1 



A 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



83 



and a memorial was sent to London at 
the time of a similar meeting in Queen's 
Hall. This memorial was signed by more 
than one hundred -members of Parlia- 
ment, about 100 mayors, and by the 
heads of almost all the religious denom- 
inations. The sentiment expressed at all 
these conventions was of this nature: 
All Christians surely favor arbitration. 
England and America should take the 
lead in this enlightened movement by 
-stablishing an international supreme 
urt, before which all questions of an 
international character should be argued 
and by which they should be decided. 
The similarity of our political institu- 
tions, the identity of our faith and the 
ties of race, speech and tradition plead 
for the speed}' realization of this plan, 
nd ought to render its execution com- 
paratively easy. 

These committees will meet with a com- 
mittee appointed by the London Assembly 
and all ears are anxious to hear the re- 
sult of this conference. It seems almost 
impossible that the outcome could be 
anything but most favorable to arbitra- 
tion. Someone said, "This century is 
hastening to a close. It has been marked 
by two great achievements — the estab- 
lishment of constitutional government 
throughout the civilized world and the 
abolition of slavery. If this geat moral 
reform, International Arbitration, could 
be added, we might assert that since the 
morning when the angels sang of peace 
and good will, the world had never seen 
anything so full of promise, and of future 
progress and happiness. 

May we soon be able to sing with 
meaning to our loved air " America " the 
^'ords of a recent writer. 

Two empires by the sea, 
Two nations great and free, 

Oue anthem raise; 
One race of ancient fame, 
One tongue one faith we claim, 
One God whose glorious name 

We love and praise. 

What deeds our fathers wrought, 
What battles we have fought 

Let fame record. 
Now vengeful passions cease, 
Come victories of peace, 
Nor hate, nor pride's caprice 

Unsheath the sword. 

Though deep the sea and wide, 
Twixt realm and realm, its tide, 
Binds strand to strand. 
So be the gulf between, 



Gray coasts and islands green, 
Great populace and Queen, 

By friendship spanned. 

Now may the God above 
Guard the dear lands we love, 

O'er east or west. 
Let love more fervent glow 
As peaceful ages go, 
And strength yet stronger grow 

Blessing and blest. 

C. H. Sleichter, '96. 



Monuments of Slave Labor. 

To live in this generation is to live in 
an age of art and letters. Science is mak- 
ing rapid strides toward perfection, as we 
may think, but is merely in its youth. 
Mechanical skill is employed everywhere 
in erecting buildings and monuments 
which have surprised the world both by 
their greatness and beauty. 

We need not search, we need not cast 
our eyes into the distance to find in- 
stances of voluntary labor, that is, labor 
wrought by men having the right to 
choose the terms upon which they will 
consent to labor if labor be their choice. 
Our surroundings, this very building from 
the laying of its foundations to the equip- 
ment of its various departments is a type 
of this kind of labor. It needs but a 
birds-eye view of our cities and towns to 
convince one of the marvellous progress 
in architecture and sculpture which em- 
bellish and lend a grandeur to these 
places as do the mighty and venerable 
oaks to our magnificent forests. And 
yet what are these decaying monuments 
of voluntary labor compared with the im- 
perishable relics of compulsory labor 
which are wonders yet and more so than 
in ages past. We love to read and listen 
to lectures concerning them, but with all 
the eloquence which they have inspired, 
we too often fail to give credit where 
credit is due in regard to the origin of 
these famous wonders and relics. Do we 
always remember that these wonderful 
specimens of human labor have not been 
erected by the natives of the countries in 
which they are found, but rather by mul- 
titudes of prisoners and slaves who were 
put to work in most cases against their 
own will and without any hope of reward. 
Have we net too often considered our- 
selves under deep obligations to these 
different nations for these marvellous 
relics of past ingenuity and skill, when in 



84 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



truth they have been raised by the for- 
eigners bowing beneath the yoke of sla- 
very. 

Thus was given to mankind what could 
never or rather would never have been 
witnessed had voluntary labor been al- 
lowed to take its course. It must be re- 
membered that the slaves in those days 
were not only those who had been pur- 
chased as was the type of our American 
slavery, but the greater number consisted 
of those taken captives in war and those 
who surrendered themselves to the do- 
minion of others in the payment of debts. 
It was the hands of the slaves that tilled 
the soil, dug the mines, wove the cloth 
and built the ^ walls of Ancient Italy. 
Rome could wefl boast of her magnificent 
cities, temples, aqueducts and monu- 
ments, but in doing so she boasted of her 
slaves, for it was only through their inces- 
sant toil, linked with their own ingenuity, 
that caused Rome ever to attain the ex- 
alted position which she so haughtily 
occupied. Although busily engaged in 
conquests most of the time, Rome even 
knew how to make use of the countless 
number of slaves who were continually 
being poured into the country through 
the victories achieved by the Romans. 
They were not exchanged nor paroled as 
international laws require at the present 
time, but every individual was compelled 
to labor as was dictated by his master. 
The craftsmen who were numerous among 
the slaves were retained at Rome and 
forced to exercise their ingenuity and 
skill for the pleasure and comfort of the 
nobles, while those not as skilled, but 
still capable of labor, were condemned to 
till the soil and tend the flocks regardless 
of their former position in society and 
state. Great was the fall in many cases ; 
from knighthood to slavery and from 
riches to poverty. But labor they must 
and what Rome could not or would not 
accomplish was required at the hands 
of the slaves and wonderful indeed were 
the results. Rome could not help but 
advance under such circumstances both 
in riches and splendor until she became 
the peer and superior of all nations 
known at that time. 

We turn our eyes from Rome and cast 
them toward China and are surprised by 
seeing a continuous wall along its north- 
ern boundary carried over the highest 
mountains, through the deepest valleys, 
across rivers and every other natural 



obstacle. Its proportions are wonderful, 
being 1,250 miles long, 20 feet high and 
25 feet wide at the base. It was intended 
as a bulwark against Tartar invasions, 
which had been frequent. We behold it 
with wonder and then think of the rathe 
lazy nature of the people and the tw 
facts are not reconciled. But suddenly 
the thought of compulsory labor is 
awakened within us and the mystery i 
explained. The world-renouned and fa- 
mous wall of China is a lasting monu- 
ment of the forced labor of slaves and no 
by any voluntary labor of the Chinese. 
In search of other and more interestin 
reminders of slavery we cross the country, 
and after a tedious journey stand upon 
the shores of Egypt. We begin our tou 
of inspection and soon detect the peak 
of some strange and peculiar structure 
in the distance, which gradually loom u 
as we approach until we stand in the 
awe-inspiring presence of those wonderfu 
Pyramids of which poets loved to sing. 
Wonder again takes possession of us wit 
such an irresistible force as to cause one 
almost to deny the possibility of these 
huge masses being the product of human 
hands. The enormity and stupendous 
amount of labor expended in their con- 
struction makes them one of the Seven 
Wonders of the World. It is with pecu 
liar feelings that one gazes on thes 
startling specimens of human toil an 
the thought presents itself, "Is it possi 
ble that man will go to the expense an 
labor of erecting such monsters merely a 
tombs for their dead monarchs ? " Im- 
possible. The native freemen woul 
never have wasted their energies on such 
foolishness, as they undoubtedly termed 
it. The prime agent at work, however, 
was slave labor. The lives of thousands 
were sacrificed at the point of the lash in 
constructing these renowned monuments. 
But the Pyramids are not the only in- 
stances in which the Egyptians employed 
slaves in erecting wonders, the honor 01 
which they claimed themselves. Recall 
how the Israelites when captives m 
Egypt rebuilt those beautiful treasure 
cities and other monuments of whic 
Pharaoh often boasted. It was througn 
her slaves that Egypt became the Queen 
of nations during her Golden Age. 
Thus it is an undeniable fact that tn 



nations who employed these many 



slaves 



had worldly success, but at the expense 
and degradation of others. Again do w 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



So 



hear the saying, "All men are born 
equal," and thus have the right to choose 
whether they will labor or not. For one 
nation to prosper through the unrewarded 
labor of slaves is a wrong, and a gross 
wrong, which should not be tolerated by 
any nation. Most of this kind of slavery 
has disappeared, but there are other 
slaves working day after day with a 
small salary so that our millionaires may 
eat, drink and be merry. This is a wrong 
equal to, and almost greater, than the 
former, and it is only when monopoly is 
destroyed and the rich and poor are 
placed on a more equal basis that we can 
truly say, "Slavery is no more." 

H. H. Heberey, '96. 



Oustavus Adolphus. 

Nations and governments, like indi- 
vidual men, are tied and bound by the 
chain of their sins from which they can 
be freed only when a new spirit is 
breathed into them. 

Little more than four centuries ago the 
European nations were chained together 
in the great sin against Protestanism, 
living in confusion and destitute of that 
splendor which fascinates the human eye, 
destitute of the pomp and grandeur of 
national glory, destitute of powerful and 
flourishing incentives to virtue, suffering 
from corruptions and internal vices. 
They longed for those who would breathe 
upon them peace and harmony, not only 
with the tendencies of modern civiliza- 
tion, but also with the essential character 
of Christianity itself, as conceived by its 
founder and his apostles, and so to make 
it once more the great civilizing influence 
for the elevation of mankind. 

Of the greatest of these was Gustavus 
Adolphus. Born at Stockholm, December 
9, 1594, his cradle, so to speak, was 
rocked in the midst of national commo- 
tions, and at an early age his brilliant 
natural endowments developed rapidly 
under the excellent influence of his par- 
ents. They endeavored to inspire in 
him habits of industry and encouraged 
him to practice all the virtues which 
^ork together to exalt a man into a noble 
and Christian character, and that kind of 
education which fashions the noblest and 
most resolute virtues and which gives to 
men that granite steadfastness which ever 
wi ns the highest admiration. When 
seventeen years of age he succeeded his 



father, Charles IX., King of Sweden, to 
the throne. It has been well remarked, 
that no king ever took in his hands the 
reins of government under more unfavor- 
able circumstances, and we may add that 
never were difficulties more swiftly sur- 
mounted. His power, threatened on all 
sides, was thus assured by a succession 
of victories, and the liberal spirit of the 
Swedes, whose devotion to their king 
shrank before no sacrifice, joined to a 
wise administration, soon replenished the 
public treasury, which had been drained 
by so many wars. Although he was 
eminently a warlike king, he made many 
salutary changes in the internal adminis- 
tration of his country, and devoted his 
short intervals of peace to the promotion 
of commerce, reforming in all branches; 
industry encouraged and education great- 
ly improved. Thus the wide-reaching 
mind of Gustavus Adlophus had raised 
this unimportant and hitherto unknown 
kingdom to a high rank among the 
powers of Europe. 

As a hero, we find him sharing the 
hardships of war on an equality with the 
meanest soldier in his army, always 
maintaining a calm serenity amidst the 
hottest fury of battle; his glance was 
omnipresent, and he intrepidly forgot the 
danger, while he exposed himself to the 
greatest peril. His natural courage, 
indeed, too often made him forget the 
duty of a hero, and as a result the life of 
the king ended in the position of a com- 
mon soldier. But such a leader was fol- 
lowed to victory alike by the coward and 
the brave, and his eagle glance marked 
every heroic deed which his example had 
inspired. But is it a wonder that he was 
a hero, when we see his heroism insti- 
gated by the pious ardor of his imagina- 
tion, in which he saw in his own cause, 
that' of heaven and the decisive interfer- 
ence of providence against his enemies ? 
And is it a wonder when he saw in him- 
self the instrument of divine vengeance 
and beheld the cause of Christ in view 
and the Bible as his banner, that he ad- 
vanced on wings of victory to the very 
heart of Germany ? 

As a general, Gustavus Adolphus was 
indisputably the greatest of his age, and 
the bravest soldier in the army which he 
had formed. Familiar with the tactics of 
Greece and Rome, he had discovered a 
more effective system of warfare, which 
was adopted as a model by the most emi- 



86 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



nent generals of subsequent times. And 
in no place did he display his generalship 
better than on that memorable day of the 
battle of Leipzig, when Gustavus and 
Tilly, the greatest generals of the time, 
both hitherto invincible, were now to be 
matched against each other in a contest 
which both had long avoided, and on this 
field of battle the hitherto untarnished 
laurels of one leader must drop forever. 
But the prudence and military skill of 
Gustavus was irresistible, and as the sun 
lowered in the west on that beautiful 
day he snatched from Tilly all former 
honor and renown. Thus with a sword 
in one hand and mercy in the other, he 
traversed Germany as a conqueror, a law- 
giver, and a judge in as short a time al- 
most as the tourists of pleasure. 

No fortress was inaccessible, no river 
checked his victorious career, advancing 
from victory to victory without meeting 
an enemy able to cope with him, like 
Napoleon he conquered by the very terror 
of his name. 

As a moralist, Gustavus Adolphus was 
pre-eminently religious and his success in 
battle is perhaps to be ascribed not only 
to a better mode of warfare and to the 
stricter discipline which he enforced, but 
also still more to the moral influence 
which his deep-seated piety and his per- 
sonal character inspired among his sol- 
diers. The General's eye looked as vigi- 
lantly to the morals as to the martial brav- 
ery of his soldiers, and every regiment was 
ordered to form around its chaplain for 
morning and evening prayers. The pres- 
tiges of pomp and grandeur had not so 
dazzled him as to make him forget his 
frailty. In noplace did he show his rev- 
erence to the one, to whom he was conse- 
crated, more than after his victory at Leip- 
zig, when amid the dead and wounded, 
Gustavus Adolphus threw himself on his 
knees, and the first joy of his victory 
gushed forth in fervent prayer. Also, at 
the last fatal morning of that battle of 
Lutzen, the King kneeled in front of his 
lines and offered up his devotions, and 
the whole army at the same moment, 
dropping upon their knees burst into an 
earnest moving hymn, and those were 
the last feeble petitions that gushed forth 
from the almost divine lips of Gustavus 
Adolphus, for in the midst of the battle 
that day, he received a wound which 
proved to be fatal, and he breathed his 
last amidst the rage and fury of the fight. 



The victory of Lutzen was the cause o 
more grief than joy to the Swedes, their 
beloved king was dead, but to the power 
which rules the world no loss of a single 
man is irreparable. Nevertheless his 
army wept over him as for a father, and 
all the Protestants of Europe felt that 
their most cherished hopes were buried 
with him in the grave. Thus Gustavus 
Adolphus was untimely torn from a 
whole world of great designs and from 
the ripening harvest of his expectations. 
The Protestant party had identified its 
hopes with its invincible leader and 
scarcely could they now separate from 
him, fearing that all good fortune was 
lost, and that German Protestantism 
would be hurled back scores of years in 
the march of civilization. And now, in 
conclusion, to whatever we may attribute 
the greatness of Gustavus Adolphus, we 
must admit he was not as a mere moun- 
tain top, catching a little earlier the 
beams, which by their own course would 
soon have found the valleys, but rather 
by the divine ordination under which he 
rose, like the sun itself, to carry on the 
work of reformation. For he was truly 
fitted for this special work. In all the 
pages of history there is probably no man 
who leaves such an impression of that 
energy under restraint, which is the 
truest mark of greatness in human char- 
acter, as it is the source of all that is sub- 
lime or lovely in nature or in art. Con- 
sidering these facts then, I think the 
name of Gustavus Adolphus should be 
dear to every nation of the earth, and 
dearer to Protestants, dear to national his- 
tory as Washington is to America, for a 
part of the price he paid for the rescue of 
religious liberty of Europe was his own 
blood. Had it not been for him, our 
Protestantism might have been borne 
down and swept away from the world in 
a torrent of blood and fire. 

Like Luther, "he won the trophies of 
power and the garlands of affection. ' ' He 
has monuments in marble, metals in gold, 
but his noblest monument is the best love 
of best hearts, and the brightest, purest 
impression of his image has been left in 
the souls of regenerated nations. Let us 
adore him as one of the best teachers oi 
loyalty and heroism and as one of _ the 
mightiest factors in procuring relig 10US 
freedom for the world. 

C. B. Wingerd, '97- 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



87 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 



TIIE COLLEGE FOKT'M is published monthly thronsh- 
ont the college year by the Philokosmian Literary Society 



Terms: Twenty-five cents a year, Ave cents per copy. 

T^ COLLEGE FORUM will be forwarded to all sub- 
scribers until an order is received for its discontinuance, 
and until all arrearages have been pai-l. 



Address all business communications to W. G. 
fjlippinger, Annville, Pa. 

Address all communications for publication, ex- 
changes, etc , to Box 776. Annville, Pa. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as 
second-class mail matter. 



E tutorial. 



The next issue will be the annual com- 
mencement number. Full news of the 
exercises, orations, visitors, actions of the 
trustees and other interesting items will 
appear in it. It will be out in luly. 

Many students make a mistake in 
thinking that character is not fully formed 
while going to school, and are, therefore, 
somewhat careless in regard to their 
habits. The student that is more or less 
careless while going to school and does 
not make any effort to correct his faults 
while he is being educated generally, af- 
ter he has graduated he has passed be- 
yond that age when the faults which a 
man has are capable of being corrected ; 
therefore students should be careful and 
never indulge in anything that is not in 
harmony with the best character. 

There is room for improvement in our 
chapel singing. Last year we refused to 
sing because we said we were tired of the 
old song-books. ' ' Get new books, ' ' was 
heard on all sides. Well, excellent new 
hymnals, made expressly for students, 
Were provided. Now we have new books, 



but little " new " singing. Prof. Lehman, 
our competent leader, has done what he 
could to improve the chapel music. We 
have not, as students, lent him our efforts 
to help. O, that we might hear from the 
student body a united " We can, and we 
will make our chapel singing what it 
ought to be!" 

Some students are afflicted with what 
might be called the "spring fever;" it is, 
in truth, a serious and contagious disease, 
but it is not incurable and those who are 
afflicted with it should not expose them- 
selves too much to the rays of the sun, 
but should confine themselves a little 
more to their rooms, and drink of the 
water of resolution and determination, 
and begin again to cultivate their minds. 

Many students complain, even after 
having gone to school for two or three 
years, that they must work hard if they 
want to know their lessons. A student, 
after having gone to school for two or 
three years, who has only four or five 
studies ought never to have any occasion 
to complain, because he has arrived at 
that stage when, after having once read 
a lesson, he ought to be able to lay aside 
his book and say, "I know my lesson 
and can recite it to perfection." A stu- 
dent that is not able to do this must 
blame himself, because it shows that he 
did not train his mind properly, and 
has not yet learned to concentrate his 
thoughts on what he is doing. 

The students, as well as the alumni, 
of Lebanon Valley College, were greatly 
encouraged by the fact that this institu- 
tion has a more favorable record for the 
current year than any other institution 
that is under the control of the United 
Brethren Church. The prospects of this 
college at present are encouraging, and, 
if the Church will give her the proper 
support, the day will not be far distant 
when this institution will bid fair a 
worthy rival of the collegiate world. 



of Lebanon Valley I ollesre. 

H. CLAY DEANEK, '79, Editor-in-Chief. 



ASSISTANT EDITORS. 

H. H. Heberly, '96. Ira E. Albert, '97. 

N. C Schlichter, '97. Jacob Zerbe, '98. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

H. Clay Deaner, '79, Publisher. 

W. G. Clippinger, '98, Business Manager. 

C. H. Sleichter, '96, Assistant Business Manager. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



"Beside the Bonnie Brier Bush." 

The history of a people may be truth- 
fully read to a large extent in the history 
of its natural language. 

Dialects are slowly but surely falling 
into disuse in proportion as the necessity 
of a pure language presents itself, so that 
in order to retain dialects in their prima- 
tive form, men must erect monuments to 
their memories. 

The Scotch dialect is one that is slowly 
but surely decaying, but Jan Mac- 
laren has reared to its memory, a lasting 
monument in his recent volume entitled 
" Beside the Bonnie Brier Bush." 

The scene of this novel is laid in a 
small glen, about eight miles in length 
and four in breadth, named Drumtochty, 
situated along the Tochty river, in Perth- 
shire, Scotland. 

It is a series of short stories or sketches, 
but underneath all and inviting all there 
lies buried a chain of thoughts that 
should the least of these be omitted it 
would destroy the harmony of the entire 
plot. 

The first of these stories is Domsie, or 
the schoolmaster. We have pictured be- 
fore us with great skill the schoolmaster 
and the site of the schoolhouse, but the 
hero of this part is Georgie Howe, the 
" lad of pairts," a good student and clever 
in all his studies. He is distined by the 
" domine " for the University of Edin- 
burg, Drunsheugh the philanthropist of 
glen paying his tuition, and his father, 
who is only a poor farmer, being obliged 
to strain every nerve to pay his ' ' keep ' ' 
as it is expressed. But George was not 
to enjoy preaching the Evangel, which 
was to be his profession, for in trying to imi- 
tate the Greeks in taking the first medal 
at school he did not like them paying as 
much attention to his physical develop- 
ment, and after lingering a short time 
after graduation his ark crossed the Jor- 
don and his spirit entered the land of 
Paradise. 

The several sketches — " The Highland 
Mystic," " His Mother's Sermon " and 
the ' ' Transformation of Sachlan Camp- 
bell " — are very closely associated with 
each other, their chief basis being the 
Free Kirk. 

The first of these treats of the Holy 
Sacrament as administered in the church 
and the conversion of Donald Menziers, 
who with Lachlau Campbell were the 
leaders of the Drumtochty congregation. 



It describes the wonderful conflicts that 
he had in retaining the faith to which he 
had been converted, and which he really 
at heart wished to retain. 

The second, his mother's sermon, tells 
of a sermon that was delivered to the 
Free Kirk congregation by the holder of 
the McWammell scholarship, a beginner, 
and who had promised his mother upon 
her death-bed that the theme of his first 
sermon would be speaking a good word 
for the master. When he returned from 
school he had not forgotten his promise, 
but had almost yielded to another theme, 
' ' The Semetic Environments, ' ' which 
was to creat quite a sensation among the 
people of the glen ; there followed a great 
conflict which was finally won in favor of 
his promise. 

In the third of these sketches, The 
Transformation of Lachlan Campbell, 
this sturdy Scotchman is described as a 
spare, wiry man not only old in years, but 
also old in experience ; a shepherd by 
profession, and when his day's work was 
done he spent his evenings in reading. 
The Free Kirk and its ministers were his 
first thoughts, that nothing short of 
sound doctrine and deep experience 
should be preached within the church of 
which he was elder. 

After the church in his estimation 
came his daughter, Flora, who, like so 
many daughters of to-day, loved not her 
father as she should have done, and one 
beautiful day left her paternal roof for a 
life in Eondon ; then came the wonderful 
trial of Sachlan 's faith in which the evil 
spirit seemed for a long time to hold 
sway, but just then appeared Margaret 
Howe and with her persuasions succeeded 
in regaining for the wondering, mis- 
guided Flora, a home. It describes her 
return and vividly portrays to the reader 
the reconciliation of father and daughter. 

In the cunning speech of Drumtochty 
we' have introduced his English factor 
and at the same time Jamie Soutar, the 
cynic of the glen, who always thought 
that whenever any stranger, especially 
an Englishman, settled within the glen 
he would, perhaps, turn the inhabitants 
to English modes and customs and so 
would always engage them in conversa- 
tion before he approved of their relation- 
ship as neighbors. 

It seemed as though a Drumtocnty 
man would never commit himself to 
positive statement on any subject if 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 89 



could find a way to escape, not because 
his mind was confused, but because he 
lacked words for accurate expressions 
that in his own mind he always seem- 
ingly held his own in a discussion. 

Drumtochty was accustomed to the 
breaking of every law of health except- 
ing those of obtaining fresh air and 
wholesome food. 

The people made no change of cloth- 
ing, summer or winter, rain or shine, so 
that such a violation of the laws of health 
was the occasion of many a ' ' hoast' ' or 
cough which was generally remedied by 
the doctor, one of the old school who 
never seemed to have time to take his 
meals or even to sleep, but seemed al- 
ways ready to administer to the wants of 
his patients. 

His practice extended over a wide area 
around the glen and he never seemed to 
grow weary attending to his duties; his 
patients made their own charges and sup- 
ported him with their small fees. 

The doctor as portrayed is by no means 
a handsome personage, but the miracu- 
lous cures that he wrought were wonder- 
ful. 

The following extract most beautifully 
portrays the funeral scene of this grand 
old man, 

" Aye dear Maclure! him maist o' a' 
We lo'e an' thro' the drifts o' sua', 
Unmindfu' o' the north wind raw, 

We tearfu' came : 
Wi' a' the morning glen we draw 
Near-haun his tomb.' 
''An' barin' there oor heids we pray 
That we may so live ilka day 
That when we come to pass away 

Frae a' things here, 
Truth may the tribute to us pay 
O' love many tears." 

In writing, "Beside the Bonnie Brier 
Bush," Jan Maclaren has undoubtedly 
Squired the attainment of his desire to 
Picture to his readers the first day in the 
Week Drumtochty, whose religion during 
the remainder of the week finds expres- 
sion in silent action more than in family 
Worship. It is, perhaps, because Drum- 
tochty in its week-day clothes is more 
difficult of adequate portraiture than in 
n s Sunday best, but certainly Drum- 
tochty is very well done. 

We find no unreality through the book, 
j*°t even in the misguided Flora or the 
ke eu tongued Jamie Soutar. We must 
Jjmit that the transformation of Donald 
^enzies trembles on the verge of un- 



reality and that the holder of the Mc- 
Wammel scholarship would be truer to 
life had he preached his new-learning 
sermon, though by discarding it he pleased 
his aunt and the spirit of his mother. 

As a matter of fact Jan Maclaren, while 
evidently a humorist by nature, is an 
enthusiast by mission. 

The author succeeded beyond doubt 
in laying bare the retirement of Scot- 
tish tenderness, Jamie Soutar plays 
his part well in preventing the whole 
from becoming depressing. 

The novel although presented in a dif- 
ferent form from the ordinary is well 
worth reading, presenting as it does the 
various characters in their true light. 

In presenting this book the author has 
painted true portraits of Scottish village 
life, and has thus done much to preserve 
in history the old Scottish national char- 
acters or types that are fast disappearing 
in the new life of the nineteenth century, 
but most important of all is the mission 
of this author to modern fiction in crea- 
ting new and healthy types of character as 
the basis of the modern novel, a much 
needed reform and in all probabilities the 
beginning of great future success. 

A. S. UI.RICH, '97. 



Our Alumni. 

'73. The Rev. Charles S. Daniel is 
the author of a book on the social prob- 
lem entitled, "Ai." Mr. Daniel has 
charge of a mission among the poor in 
the city of Philadelphia, and is doing 
noble service in his chosen field. 

'8o. Simon P. Light, Esq., was chosen 
a delegate to the National Democratic 
Convention to be held in Chicago to 
nominate a candidate for the Presidency. 

'81. The Rev. Isaiah W. Sneath is 
the author of a very readable article on 
"Whistling," in the Congregationalist of 
recent date. 

'89. The Rev. Benj. F. Daugherty, of 
Harrisburg, is the chosen orator to deliver 
the address to the graduates of the Bible 
Normal Union of the College on Sunday 
evening of commencement week. 

'90. Among the recent graduates of 
the Union Biblical Seminary, at Dayton, 
Ohio, was the Rev. E. O. Burtner, of 
the East Pennsylvania Conference. He 
had for his graduating address the subject 
of "The Spirit of Altruism," which he 
discussed in a very logical and eloquent 
manner. 



90 



THE COLLEGE FOB UAL 



'92. On the 23d day of April Mr. 
Elmer L. Haak was happily united in 
wedlock to Miss Lizzie R. Tice, of Myers- 
town, by his pastor, the Rev. Mr. Keiper. 
Mr. Haak and wife are now nicely housed 
in a beautiful new mansion on South 
Railroad street, where they will be 
pleased to receive their friends. 

'93. Mr. Samuel T. Meyer is now a 
student in Eastman's Business College, 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 



Personals and Locals. 

Commencement approaches. 

Examination reproaches. 

The Seniors have put the finishing 
touches to their orations. 

Some of our " Theologs " have set us 
a good example lately by attending the 
dime circus in town. 

Band music is something so rare for 
this town that the students heartily en- 
ioyed that given by the circus band re- 
cently. 

(Professor in Horace to student talking 
to a lady) — " I wonder if you are arrang- 
ing a meter (meet her) or what." 

The Chapel was the scene of an en- 
joyable occasion on April 20th, namely, 
the anniversary exercises of the Junior 
Y. P. C. U. of the U. B. Church. 

Prof. Lehman w 7 as compelled to be ab- 
sent from his usual duties for a few days 
on account of the serious illness of his 
wife. 

The class in Mineralogy has made 
rapid progress and will complete the work 
long before the usual time. 

C. H. Sleichter, '96, attended a bril- 
liant wedding on the 22nd tilt., and then 
left for Shamokin to join the rest of the 
" Quartette " on their concert tour. 

The ' ' L,ove Feast ' ' given at Palmyra 
lately was attended \by a number of stu- 
dents who report a pleasant time and 
plenty to eat. 

Yoe, '98, surprised a friend at Middle- 
town by a visit on his wheel. The pleas- 
ant memories on his return were cut 
short by a telegram calling him home to 
attend the funeral of a relative. 

Our worthy president reports his trip 
to Baltimore having been a success. He 
received in addition a contribution of a 
hundred dollars. He also attended the 
commencement exercises of the Union 



Biblical Seminary, at Dayton, Ohio 
which he pronounced very satisfactory. 

College Day was appropriately observed 
at Annville U. B. church on April 26th. 
Addresses were made by various students 
among which were 'Revs. Miller, Win- 
gerd and Clippinger. 

Stehman, '99, met with an accident 
while riding lately which resulted in a 
dislocated wrist. His hand has improved 
considerably and can be used again. 

Mr. John Young of Lancaster, son of 
Rev. Young met with us in chapel on the 
23rd inst. 

Our friend Rev. Rhoads is seen fre- 
quently at college often carrying off our 
ministers as captives to preach for him 
which they are not loath to do. 

During the sickness of Rev. Lewars of 
the Evangelical Lutheran Church, Clip- 
pinger, '99, filled his pulpit on April 20th 
and on May 10th. 

The lecture given in the College chapel 
on April 29th, by Mrs. Hammer the 
President of the State W. C. T. U. was 
grand and was certainly appreciated by 
the audience with the exception of a few 
students who could have been dispensed 
with on account of misbehavior. 

The Y. P. C. U. had a very interesting: 
session last month with the subject, 
" Temperance." Talks were given by 
Messrs. Stehman, Heberly and Prof. Leh- 
man. A beautiful duet by Misses Steh- 
man and Kephart added a charm to the 
meeting. 

Rev. Jenkins '96, has been relieved of 
his charge at Mt. Carmel and has re- 
turned to school again. Mrs. Jenkins 
accompanied him as far as Pottsville, 
where she remained with friends for a 
time, but is now boarding at the Ladies 
Hall, and will remain here until com- 
mencement. We welcome her into our 
midst. 

The Quartette gave a concert before an 
appreciative audience at Lebanon, in tri 
U. B. Church lately. They have a num- 
ber of dates to fill in the near future, 
among which are the High School com- 
mencement of town. 

The three busts of famous philosophers 
usually in Prof. McDermand's recitation 
room took a journey into the chapel 
cently to attend chapel services W*_ 
their faces painted. They were disco 
ered in time and taken home again- 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



91 



Baer has been making a number of 
visits to Reading lately, but whether 
business or pleasure calls him we know 
not. 

The monthly missionary meeting of 
the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. was 
held on the 16th inst, under the leader- 
ship of Estelle Stehman, '96. The pro- 
grame for the occasion was as follows: 

Singing. 

The Ideal Missionary Norman Schlichter. 

Missionary Recitation Leah Hartz. 

Duet H. Heberly and J. Deibler. 

Dr. Irie's Work in Japan Mary Richard. 

Select Reading, (Missionary) J. Q. Deibler. 

Singing. _ 
Benediction 

After an extended session the class of 
ninety-nine have decided on a class yell, 
which has been handed to the editors of 
The College Forum for publication. 
It reads as follows: 

Boom a lacka ! 

Boom a lacka ! 

Bow, wow, wow ! 

Didi, didi! L. V. C! 

Boom a lacka ! 

Boom a lacka ! 

Bow, wow, wow ! 

Rah she ki yine ! 
Nine-nine. 



Philokosmian Literary Society. 



Esse Quam Videri. 



R. P. Dougherty, Editor. 

The most delightful and momentous 
occasion of the year to the P. L. S. was 
the celebration of its twenty-ninth anni- 
versary, on Friday evening, May 1st. No 
brighter spectacle has greeted its view. 
No other occasion has involved so many of 
its interests. No greater success has ever 
attended the concentration of all its ener- 
gies into the performance of one act. 
. The P. L- S. does not wish to be bombas- 
tic in self-laudation; it would rather that 
its merits may establish its reputation. But 
there come times when, to speak the truth, 
seeming arrogance is no self-imposed task. 

As usual the chapel had the appear- 
an ce of a veritable springtime garden. 
4 profuse display of palms and other luxu- 
riant tropical plants decorated the ros- 
trum, towering high above the speakers, 
^hile blooming nature in every part of 
hall shed fragrance on the air. The 
^chanting and inspiring music also lent 
jj n additional charm to the occasion. 
Purely, with the noble eloquence and lit- 
erary excellence of the speakers a pleas- 



ing and instructive entertainment was of- 
fered to those who were so fortunate as to 
be present. 

The large audience which was present, 
filling the chapel hall and necessitating 
the extensive use of the spacious gallery, 
proved the wide attention caused by the 
event, and clearly showed the universal 
interest taken in all occasions which call 
for literary and oratorical effort on the 
part of the College student. 

An eloquent and suitable invocation 
was then delivered by Rev. B. F. Dough- 
erty, '89, of Harrisburg. After the ad- 
dress of welcome by the President of the 
Society, the following program was suc- 
cessfully rendered : 

Oration— International Arbitration, . . C H Sleichter. 
Oration— Monuments of Slave-labor, . . H. H. Heberly. 
Music. 

Eulogy— Gustavus Adolphus, C B. Wiugerd. 

Critique— Beside the Bonnie Brier Bush, A. S . TJlrich. 
Ex- Philokosmian Oration— The Unconscious in Edu- 
cation H. U. Roop. 

Music. 

All the speakers did well and kept up 
the reputation of previous anniversaries. 
The productions of the first four speakers 
appear in the preceding columns of The 
Forum. The ex-orator delivered an ad- 
mirably eloquent address, treating his 
theme .in an original and effective man- 
ner. We abridge some of his remarks in 
the following: "There is no work so 
noble, so inspired as teaching; the teacher 
wields an influence over the young, the 
duration of which is not measured by the 
length of a generation or the span of life; 
the roots of our life run through the soil 
of all our past experiences; the successful 
teacher of to-day is the teacher that does 
not depend on material laws or mechan- 
ical methods; the muddle-brained lesson- 
grinder should find no place in our 
schools and colleges; we are are governed 
in our actions by our impulses; in train- 
ing the mind we unconsciously shape our 
impulses, mould our character and decide 
the tend of our actions." His deep 
thought, elegant style, persuasive logic 
and earnest manner won the generous 
plaudits of his admiring hearers. 

The following of the alumni were pre- 
sent: Rev. B. F. Dougherty, '89; Rev. 
Geo K. Hartman, '94, of Lebanon, Pa.; 
William M. Hain, '88, of Harrisburg Pa. ; 
Simon P. Backenstow, '93, of Sand Beach 
Pa • Miss Maggie Strickler, '94, of 
Lebanon, Pa. The Castalian Literary 
Society of Lebanon, Pa., attended m a 
body. 



92 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



At a recent meeting of the society the 
following officers were elected: President, 
R. P. Dougherty; Vice-President, Felix 
Gingrich; Secretary, Allen Baer; Corres- 
ponding Secretary, William Hertzog; 
Treasurer, Harry Imboden; Critic, N. C. 
Schlichter; Chaplain, H. H. Hoy; Organ- 
ist, M. G. Dough terty; Janitor, Eugene 
Meyer. 

On June 5th, the following programe 
for the Senior Class will be rendered : 

Chorus By Society. 

Words by N. C Schlichter. 

Oration— Silent Forces G. A. Ulrich. 

Prophecy Ira E. Albert. 

Vocal Solo C. B. Wingerd. 

Original Poem— Ode to Class of '96 . R. P. Dougherty. 
Quartette . . Messrs. Anthony, McCrone, Clippinger, 
Deibler. 

Debate— Resolved, That Altruism is the Dominating 
Spirit of the Age. 
Aff. W. G. Clippinger. Neg. Jno. R Geyer. 

J. F. Isett. A. S. Ulrich. 

German Duet Ira E. Albert and Jacob Zerbe. 

Live Thoughts C. B. Wingerd. 

Responsive Remarks by the President of the Class of '96. 

During the spring term Messrs. Sollen- 
berger, Crone, Emenheiser, McCrone, 
Dougherty and Rev. Alex. Jenkins 
joined the society. Let those who have 
not yet entered society work but wish to 
do so, follow the example. 



Baseball. 

This year we have two baseball teams 
in College. The one is known as the 
Ministerial Baseball Club and the other 
as the L. V. C. Club. The latter is the 
regular team and it is a good one. The 
first game of the season was when the 
above clubs met on the 15th of April. 
The Ministerial club was defeated by the 
score of 19 to 14 in an uninteresting 
game. 

On May 2d, a game was scheduled be- 
tween the regular club and Albright Col- 
legiate Institute, at Myerstown. Our 
team went to Myerstown and won the 
game by forfeit, 9 to o. A. C. I. gave 
groundless reasons for not playing. 

On May 9th, Albright Collegiate Insti- 
tute played a game on our grounds. 
Tbey brought a large crowd of " rooters" 
with them who were disappointed to see 
their team beaten by L- V. C. The game 
was listless, but was witnessed by a large 
crowd. The score was 13 to 9. Bat- 
teries : E- V. C, Sleichter and Sperrow ; 
A. C. I. , Walmer, Bieber and Kelchner. 

On May 16th, the Marion Club, of 
Stouchsburg, crossed bats with the College 
nine on our grounds. The game was again 
favorable to us, but was not very snappy. 
Sleichter, our famous pitcher, kept up his 



record by striking out ten men. The 
visitors were a gentlemanly set and we 
would be glad to play them again. A 
full schedule will prevent this, however. 
Score : E. V. C, 12 ; Marion, 6. 



Ill a Literary Way. 

With each issue The Lotas grows bet- 
ter from both a literary and artistic stand- 
point. John Kendrick Bangs, America's 
successor to Twain (when he is gone) 
contributes a breezy poem, " an appeal," 
to the current issue. In the same num- 
ber, Charpiot, Knowles and A. Learned 
present fine specimens of the new art, pos- 
teristic, to coin a new term. The Lotus, 
published by college men, can be had of 
your newsdealer for five cents a copy, 
fortnightly. 

With the May number the Bachelor of 
Arts closes its second volume. The 
paper is now firmly established and is 
filling its place well as the representative 
of university interests. The lengthy and 
seasonable discussion of the ' 4 Venezuelan- 
question," by John C. Ropes is invalu- 
able to the student of current events. 
The sketches of the life and work of 
Heine, Tabb and Montaigne read like ro- 
mances and the poems of the number 
reach the height of good workmanship. 
Under the caption, "Editorial Notes," 
one can find the latest news of athletics, 
art, science and letters; New York; 
three dollars, per annum. 

The New Bohemian for May is the 
first number of that magazine issued by 
the new management. It comes with a 
new dress and new cover design and 
shows a marked improvement throughout. 
Cora Stuart Wheeler presents a strikingly 
prophetic storv in " Margaret Hanneford, 
M. C," and Henry Cleveland Wood pre- 
sents a clever piece of fiction in "Sister 
Paulina' s Lie. " The sketches by Maude 
Andrews are always brilliant and fascina- 
ting. Two new departments, " The Pas s ' 
ing Show" and "The Borders of Bo- 
hemia," have been added. The Bohemia* 
is sold for ten cents a copy. See you 
newsdealer. 

" A Study of Goethe's Faust," by R°) r 
Elbing, is a new, most valuable booK, 
just published. It is classic in K an f' t 
tion and interpretation. Through P er ^ er 
poetry and diction, it carries the rea ^ 
irresistibly to the very height of 1 
famous subject. An adaptation of 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



93 



exquisite version contained in this book 
will be played by the Elbing Faust Com- 
pany on their coming theatrical tour. 
The book may be obtained through lead- 
ing booksellers, or on receipt of $1.00 will 
be mailed to any address by the publisher, 
Adolf Haak, 25^ South High Street, 
Columbus, Ohio. 

We are glad to receive the University 
Courier, the sprightly weekly of the Un- 
iversity of Pennsylvania. The issue of 
May 8, besides containing a host of bright 
things in type, presented a good picture 
of the '96 base ball team. 

We clip the following interesting item : 
Leland Stanford University, of California, 
has a volunteer fire company composed 
of students. Its purpose is to train the 
men in case of an emergency, as no 
regular company is near the University. 
The monotony of proceedings around the 
College is often broken by false signals 
given at unexpected times in order to 
drill the men. 

The May issue of The Muhlenberg 
might lay claim to being the best one of 
the year according to our judgment. We 
like The Muhlenberg and especially this 
number with its able articles on " Fads," 
stories and so on. The progressiveness 
of the editors is shown by their comment 
on James Young, the rising actor. The 
exchange editor could do a little better, 
we think. 

Prof. Rontgen's new discovery has 
proven new food for humorists through- 
out the world. The "funny men" of 
our colleges are eagerly grasping their 
share, and the college journals are full of 
X-ray effusions in both poetry and prose. 
One humorist, the " points-ster" of the 
Otterbein s£gis, is especially happy in the 
treatment of these comical things. The 
lustrations serve to make his text more 
effective. 

The April number of the " Bulletin of 
the American Academy of Medicine," is 
^signed to be a hand-book of the Acad- 
It contains, among other things, a 
list of the honorary members of the 
Academy and the constitution and by- 
p's of the same. This paper has pub- 
fsued, and will publish, the ablest articles 
J r °m the pens of representative physicians 
tr om time to time. Among last year's 
^utributors we notice the names of Drs. 
^uima Culbertson, of Boston, and De- 



Lancey Rochester, of Buffalo. It is pub- 
lished at Easton, Pa., for three dollars a 
year. 

A recent number of the Colorado Col- 
legian is devoted in its entirety to the 
interests of Colorado College. This shows 
a true college spirit on the part of its 
editors. They state their noble object in 
an editorial : "That our friends may be- 
come more intimately acquainted with us, 
and that others may become our friends." 
The religious, social and educational 
features of the College are ably described. 
Several good cuts also adorn the pages. 



Commencement Week. 

The exercises of Commencement week 
for this year will occur in the following 
order : 

Saturday evening, June 13th, reception 
to the Senior Class by President and Mrs. 
Bierman. 

Sunday, the 14th, at 10 A. M., Bacca- 
laureate " sermon by the Rev. Bishop 
James W. Hott, D. D., EL. D., of Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa. At 7.30 P. M., gradua- 
ting exercises of the Bible Normal Union, 
and address by the Rev. Benj. F. 
Daugherty, A. M., of Harrisburg, Pa. 

Monday, the 15th, at 7.30 P. M., 
graduating exercises of the Department 
of Music. 

Tuesday, the 16th, at 9 A. M., annual 
meeting of the Board of Trustees. At 
7.30 P. M., public meeting of the Alumni 
Association. Address by Rev. C. A. 
Burtner, Ph. D. Essay by Mrs. E. S. 
Bowman. At 9.30 P. M., Alumni ban- 
quet. 

Wednesday, the 17th, at 2 P. M., Class 
Day exercises. At 7.30 P. M., annual 
address before the Literary Societies by 
the Hon. William N. Ashman, LE. D., 
Judge of the Orphans' Court, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

Thursday, the 18th, at 9 A. M. Com- 
mencement exercises. Conferring of de- 
grees and announcements. 8 to 1 1 P. M. , 
reception by the Senior Class. 

The friends of the College and of edu- 
cation in general are most cordially invited 
to attend these exerceises. Railroad or- 
ders on the Philadelphia and Reading, 
and the Cumberland Valley Railroads 
may be obtained by addressing President 
Bierman. 



94 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



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Down Trains. 



Lv. Winchester 

" Martinsburg . ... 

" Hagerstown 

" Greencastle 

" Mercersburg 

" Chambersburg .. 

" Waynesboro . ... 

" Shippensburg 

" Newville 

" Carlisle 

" Mechanicsburg., 

Ar. Dillsburg 

" Harrisburg 



Philadelphia., 

New York 

Baltimore 



No. 2 No. 4 No. 6 No. S No.10 



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7 32 

7 51 

8 18 

8 43 
• 6 50 

9 03 

P. M. 

12 17 

2 33 
12 20 



+A.M. 

7 20 

8 02 

8 48 

9 10 

7 4a 

9 33 

8 00 

9 53 
10 11 
10 35 

10 56 
9 30 

11 15 
P. M. 

3 00 
5 53 
3 10 
p. If. 



tP.M. 



12 20 
12 42 



1 04 
11 40 
1 24 

1 41 

2 05 
2 27 
2 00 
2 45 

P. M. 

5 47 
8 23 

6 15 
P. If, 



tP. M. 

2 35 

3 22 
■ 410 

4 33 

2 50 

5 05 
400 
5 27 

5 48 
('. 15 

6 38 
600 

7 00 
P. M. 
11 15 

3 53 
10 40 
P. M. 



1020 
1039 
11 M 
1125 



1145 
A.M. 
4 30 
733 
620 
A. M. 



*Daily. 



t Daily except Sunday. 



Additional trains will leave Carlisle for Harrisburg daily 
except Sunday at 5.45 a. m., 7.00 a. m., 12.30 p. m., 3.45 p. m., 
and 8.05 p. m., and from Mechanicsburg at 6.10 a. m., 7.25 
a. m., 9.54 a. m., 12.55 p. m., 4.10 p. m., 5.10 p. m., and 8.30 p. 
m., stopping at Second St., Harrisburg, to let ofl passengers. 

Nos. 2 and 10 run daily between Harrisburg and Hagerstown. 

Through coach from Hagerstown to Philadelphia on train 
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Up Trains. 



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" New York .. .. 
" Philadelphia.. 



" Harrisburg 

" Dillsburg 

" Mechanicsburg. 

" Carlisle 

" Newville 

" Shippensburg.... 

" Waynesboro 

" Chambersburg.. 

" Mercersburg 

" Greencastle 

" Hagerstown 

" Martinsburg 

Ar. Winchester 



No. 1 No. 3 No 5 No. 



tP. M. 

11 50 
8 00 
11 20 

A. If, 

5 00 



5 19 

5 40 

6 05 
6 23 



13 



7 10 

7 30 

8 20 

9 00 
A. W. 



*A.M. 

4 55 
12 15 

4 30 
A. M. 

7 55 
9 10 

8 16 

8 40 

9 05 
9 23 

10 40 
9 45 

11 05 
10 10 
10 32 

12 Mil 
1 45 

noon 



tA. M. fA.M. 
8 20 11 40 

9 30 

8 23 I li 25 

A. If. P. M. 
1 1 30 -M'> 
1 30 



11 50 

12 13 
12 38 
12 57 

2 20 
1 20 
5 43 
1 46 
210 



4 40 
4 05 
4 28 

4 53 

5 13 

6 10 
5 35 



6 00 

6 25 

7 08 
7 55 

P. If, 



NO. 9 

*p M. 
440 
200 
440 
P.M. 
815 



921 



1000 



10 s 

1045 



*Daily. 



tDaily except Sunday. 



Additional local trains will leave Harrisburg daily, exceP 1 
Sunday, for Carlisle and intermediate stations at 9.3 5 * 
m„ 2.25 p. m., 5.20 p. m., 6.20 p. m., and 10.55 !'• 
also for Mechanicsbuig and intermediate stations at 8.1' ^ 
m., 12.40 p. m. All of the above trains will stop at Secon" 
St., Harrisburg, to take on passengers. 
Nos. 3 and 9 run daily between Harrisburg and Hagersto* , 
Through coach from Philadelphia to Hagerstown on tra"" 
Nos. 5 and 9. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



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96 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



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THE 



College FoRun 



JULY, 1896. 



. * CONTENTS : f • 



The Pulpit and Politics 97-99 

| Criminality '. * 99, 100 

The New South 100-102 

Class Poem . . *. 1° 2 

Editorial Staff 1° 3 

Editorials 103, 104 

Trustee Meeting 105, 106 

Commencement Week 106, 107 



Commencement Day 
Our Alumni . . . . 

Baseball 

In a Literary Way . 



PA OS 

107, 10* 

108> 

ion- 
ics 



College Day 108, 109 

Despair 109 

Exchange Notes 109 

Advertisements 110-112 



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THE COLLEGE EOEUM. 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Vol. IX. No. 1. 



ANNVILLE, PA., JULY, 1896. 



Whole No. 93. 



The Pulpit and Politics. 

The master-mind enters upon each 
period in its history with caution and 
humility. Calm deliberation and self- 
questioning mark the progress of the 
great soul through its allotted crises. 

The true man pauses, questions, de- 
cides, then acts ; and if decision point the 
way to achievements lofty and sublime, 
the ensuing action is marked by an un- 
swerving purpose and an unbending will. 
There is no faltering, no hesitating more, 
the bridges are burned, and the soul 
marches into the thick of battle. Pericles 
the orator, with humble mien, prays the 
gods to give him discretion in his public 
efforts, then, steeled for the fray, enters 
the arena of speech a veritable gladiator. 

That grand aggregation of intellect, the 
Continental Congress, face to face with 
the question of human liberty, sits in a 
profound silence, and out of that thought- 
ful silence comes the resolution to do and 
dare and die. 

The great Emancipator, honored as 
the people's choice for his country's 
highest office, tries himself before the 
bar of his own conscience and upon the 
strength of its verdict, assumes a nation's 
burden to lay it down only in the hour 
of death. And so it is with all men who 
are true to conscience and to God, no 
step is taken unthinkingly and each de- 
cision must be weighed in the uncompro- 
mising balance of the right. And it is 
well so. 

For the being, who, failing to measure 
his own strength, or madly over-estimat- 
ing it, grapples with immensities but 
prophesies his own ruin. 

The king must ponder well before he 
mounts his throne, the judge-elect before 
he occupy his bench, the successful sol- 
dier ere he accept the proffered commis- 
sion. All these must descend into the 
valley of humiliation, but that valley will 
be as the mountain top to the depths of 
self-abnegation into which that soul must 



sink that would worthily stand between 
God and his kind — the representative of 
Jehovah, the occupant of the pulpit. 

And what the pulpit should have been, 
to a remarkable degree, it has been. 
Though sometimes in the course of the 
passing years men have used the pulpit 
to obtain tyrannical power ; have made it 
a place of amusement, a platform for the 
display of learning and a battle ground 
for critical conflict, the power of the pul- 
pit for good has never waned. It has 
well maintained its claim of being God- 
given. In every age, and in ever in- 
creasing numbers, men have stood in the 
pulpit, prepared for the sacred office by 
humiliation and prayer. 

Men whose voices have rung out the 
eternal challenge to workers of iniquity, 
whose feet have trodden undeviatingly the 
path of truth, whose arms nerved with 
purpose, have struck giant blows for 
justice and for God. To-day the minis- 
ters of the word are a mighty army: each 
soldier a volunteer, equipped, disciplined 
and filled with the zeal of righteousness, 
and the question arises shall this army be 
circumscribed in its movements, shall it 
be confined to distinctly religious opera- 
tions; shall it accept as a worthy reason for 
eschewing politics, the popular cry "re- 
ligion is religion and politics are politics. 

Or is there a moral duty devolving 
upon it to throw itself into the political 
struggles of the times— let us see. 

Politics should mean, and "once did 
mean the ethical conduct of the affairs 
of a city or a nation; the devising of 
honorable means for the preservation of 
the safety, peace and prosperity of a 
people; the aiding of the poor, the pro- 
tectino- of the weak, the controlling of 
the vicious; the building up, by an equi- 
table attention to all concerned of a 
common government. 

Such politics God has always blessed 
The deluge was but the clearing of 
the way for the establishment of social 



98 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



ties and political affinities. Babel marked 
the downfall of the reign of nomadic and 
the beginning of organized political life. 
The Hebrew nation came into political 
being with God himself as the arbiter of 
its course, while the nation remained in- 
corrupt and its rulers upright, God pros- 
pered it and made its political manage- 
ment seem worthy the best efforts of its 
foremost sons. The political history of 
Greece, Rome and the later governments 
of the world in their periods of purity 
are but an added testimony to the august 
majesty of clean politics. 

The Hebrews fell, the Greeks fell, the 
Romans fell, other nations have fallen, 
and still others will fall if political de- 
generacy go on unchecked. 

Between what is and what should be 
what a mighty waste! A "political 
career ' ' is synonymous with protracted 
villainy; "political victory" is but an- 
other name for the unscrupulous manipu- 
lation of men and the lavish expenditure 
of ill-gotten gold. 

A ' ' brilliant campaign ' ' means the 
high-handed betrayal of the public. 

O politics, what enormities are com- 
mitted in thy name! 

The sacrificing of virtue, the prostitu- 
tion of talent, the ruthless trampling to 
earth of the moaning millions of God's 
poor, the multiplying of merciless monop- 
olies — all covered by the one word — 
politics. 

And the eyes of the world are open to 
the corruptions of the times. 

Many so-called reformers have arisen. 

Philosophers who have been content 
with fine spun theories, philanthropists 
who, in the goodness of" their hearts, 
haved erred upon the side of charity; in- 
fidels who would annihilate all existing 
conditions only to leave in their place 
chaotic despair; politicians who have 
sought to avert impending doom by 
promising to take each succeeding cam- 
paign "out of politics," only to forget 
the promise in the rush for spoils. 

No deliverance need be expected from 
those who, consciously or unconsciously, 
are influenced by the evils they seek to 
remedy. 

The Romans entrapped by the foe found 
their deliverer in a Cincinnatus who had 
been content to live upon his modest 
farm, far from intrigue and struggle. 
To turn the world upside down one must 
be outside the world. 



The revolutionizing of politics is to be 
accomplished by a power outside of itself 
and that power is the Christain Church 
with the pulpit as its exponent. The 
revolution is to be complete and per- 
manent, based upon the same ethical 
principles that underlie the pulpit itself. 

What legislative enactment and physi- 
cal force have failed to do, the Church, 
through the pulpit, has done and will yet 
do. The religious rites of the Romans 
were an indispensable part of their na- 
tional being, and it was by exposing the 
absurdities of their worship that Chris- 
tianity undermined their governmental 
system. 

An eminent historian tells us that in 
Ireland a combination of priests could 
carry any election against a combination 
of peers, and that the oratorjr of the 
country clergy was one of the most potent 
forces of the land. 

A preacher first gave public vent to the 
popular feeling in England against the 
greed of land owners. 

The early Governors of Connecticut 
showed their belief in the influence of the 
pulpit by enacting a law to the effect that 
the clergy should preach upon the politi- 
cal duties of citizens before each election. 

It was a Beecher, not only magnetic in 
personality, but vested with ecclesiastical 
authority, who alone could stem the tide 
of British hatred and get a hearing for 
his country in her struggles. 

And in these last days it has come about 
that a fearless man of God has come to 
be the recognized leader in organized 
conflict with political corruption — a leader 
whose name is a terror to evil doers 
and a household word in thousands of 
God-fearing homes — Parkhurst, the re- 
former. 

All this is not an accident, but the re- 
vealed working of a divine providence. 
God has ordained that the body politic 
should be founded upon the individual. 
He has ordained also that the teachings 
of the pulpit should be for the individual, 
and that they should be applicable to the 
exigencies of the most active and varied 
life. 

The Church is emerging from one 01 
her seasons of trial. Church and State 
having | been torn apart, she has, for a 
time, seemed to drift into a tendency to 
shun anything political in it bearing 

But she is finding her place. F ree 
from the charge of seeking her own ag' 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



grandizement, and, on the other hand, 
seeing her duty to the world, she bids her 
representatives grapple with iniquities, 
wherever found for the sake of truth and 
justice. 

And shall the pulpit falter m its task — 
shall it ignore the claims of the Church 
and the pleadings of the world? No, a 
thousand times, no ! 

Far, far above the fetid pool wherein 
lies the ensign of politics tower the moun- 
tain peaks of equity and peace. Their 
stillness, a rebuke to mortal vileness and 
an inspiration to the aspiring sons of 
men. Upon their highest crest float the 
standards of religious liberty, intellectual 
progress and material achievement. But 
the banner of politics lies in its stagnant 
pool, while they whose hearts bleed for 
the dawning of the new era look, in vain 
to the hills for the waving signal of the 
onward march. Man of God ! to place 
that banner besides its kind is a task 
worthy thy grandest effort, representative 
of an institution with a glorious past, a 
sublime present, an eternal future, though 
thou art. To thee all things are possible 
in the strength of the eternal God. 

Down then servant of Jehovah, into 
the depths of political degradation. Down 
into the dark abyss of greed for the love 
of country and the love of God. Down 
thou apostle of truth, filled with a mighty 
zeal, down past impeding bramble, yawn- 
ing precipice and jutting crag. Down, 
nor rest until thy hand grasp the bedrag- 
gled emblem of politics, foul with the 
filth of stagnation. Then in the strength 
of thy God, up ! 

Up from the slimy bank of the pool, 
through the dreary waste around it, past 
the stunted undergrowth along the slip- 
pery way heedless of harassing foes. 

Up, with thy floating banner purified 
by the breezes of the heights into which 
thou goest. Up, nor pause until thou 
hast reached the summit and planted the 
standard in its waiting place to be a 
blessing to thy kind and a harbinger of 
the world's political emancipation. 
Press onward man of might : nor stay- 
To rest upon the weary way. 
Far up above the hills of God 
Lies rest for those who faithful plod. 
Excelsior ! , 
J. Alex. Jenkins, '96. 

Criminality. 

Criminal tendencies seem to have been 
Peculiar to man ever since the beginning 



99 



of the race. No nation or people has 
ever been free from the stain of crimi- 
nality. In every phase of social and 
political life this has been a marked 
characteristic, and no moral enterprise has 
ever been able to remove these dark blots 
from the face of human society. 

A criminal is one who for some reason 
is unable or unwilling to live up to a cer- 
tain generally accepted rule or standard. 
A criminal act is an act which interferes 
with the rights or endangers the safety of 
a neighborhood. 

There are many kinds as well as many 
degrees of criminality, and the varied 
kinds depend very much upon the 
causes leading up to the same. Those 
causes may be either immediate or re- 
mote, but both lead to criminal results. 
An immediate cause is not purely of hered- 
itary transmission, but rather the result 
of immediate circumstances. For illus- 
tration, an uncontrollable passion accom- 
panied by a selfish disposition may be 
provoked to commit acts rashly. 

A weak will with little or no principle 
will be seen to yield easily to crime when- 
ever the temptation becomes sufficiently 
strong, but if a strong passion be found 
with a weak* will, an individual will be 
seen who is an habitual criminal, with a 
desire to live as a parasite upon society. 

The remote causes for criminality may 
be more numerous and more varied than 
the immediate. They are those influences 
which are either inherited or become 
deeply rooted in the nature after birth, 
and which seem to overpower every other 
crood influence which may be brought to 
bear in after life. It is a fact that much 
crime is the result of inherited tendencies 
or a reversion to ancestral types, and 
though this may lie dormant for two or 
even three generations, it is as sure to 
appear somewhere in a line of descend- 
ants as is the appetite for whisky or a 
tendency to insanity. That this is true 
may be found by a bit of history relating 
to the Jukes family, in the State of New 
York This family is said to have sprung 
from a woman of low character, and the 
descendants of whom number some 1,200. 
Of these 709 were traced and the inci- 
dents of their career tabulated ; 280 re- 
ceived public charity, and 76 were pun- 
ished for crime, while a majority of all 
were offenders against virtue, and a large 
proportion diseased. An ingenious cal- 
culation sets forth an actual loss to the 



100 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



State of one million and a quarter of dol- 
lars during a period of seventy-five years. 

Another remote cause for crime comes 
through a neglect to educate the youth 
of our land, leaving the child in igno- 
rance and idleness to become the contempt 
of society. The boy not trained in the 
right direction becomes a handy receptacle 
for all vice and crime. 

The majority of crimes are begun in 
youth. The habits of youth are natural 
in manhood. Again, too much luxury 
and pampering of passions, encouraging 
selfishness, enfeebling the body ; all these 
are sure to bring on criminality in some 
form or other. Crime is like a disease. 
It spreads like a contagion. 

It is no uncommon occurrence for a 
whole community to be seized with an 
epidemic of robbery. This was true in 
frontier life. It has been noticed also 
that suicide and murder becomes an in- 
fection. In some of the standing armies 
of Europe suicide is a common thing and 
in some instances it becomes so general 
that it seems like a mania. 

Reading of crime causes many people 
to meditate upon the circumstances until 
they become possessed with the idea and 
commit a similar act. At least two cases 
and probably three attended by perfectly 
hideous circumstances, one in Australia 
and one in the West have been directly 
traced to the reading of the White Chapel 
horrors perpetrated by the wretch who 
signed himself "Jack the Ripper." 

Those 3'ellow-backed romances, the 
ten cent novel, the Police Gazette and all 
the highly colored sensational articles of 
the daily news is so much poison to the 
youthful susceptibilities. Those wild 
west stories full of bloody encounters, fire 
lip the imaginations of the young mind 
until it is ready to commit in reality the 
deed already committed in the imagina- 
tion. Must young manhood and young 
womanhood be blighted and society suffer 
in consequence, so that the newspaper 
and the dime novel may flourish ? 

We quarantine cholera, vaccinate 
against small pox and maintain a board 
of health at great expense so that health 
of the body may be preserved. 

We try to keep disease out of our 
country by thoroughly examining every 
steamer that comes into our ports. 

Every man is compelled to remain at a 
safe distance on board the ship until all 
have been pronounced fit to land, but it 



is not so with the literature which is 
landed upon the fertile soil of the young 
mind. 

With little or no knowledge to dis- 
criminate and with no kind hand to direct, 
they glut their minds with such un- 
wholesome, impure food, that after a 
time no human hands can alleviate the 
sufferings of a poisoned brain. 

Our courts punish crime with a view 
of preventing it, but the cause is never 
touched. The same thing is done when 
the physician is called in to cure a disease. 
Would it not be wiser and much better 
to call in the doctor to prevent illness? 

The way to prevent crime is to remove 
the cause, but to do this it is necessary 
to go back farther than the boy's life. 
Go back to the parent and ' ' train him up 
in the way he should go." 

Every immoral influence should be 
carefully removed through the medium 
of education. Until recent^ education 
was given to those only who desired it, 
but to make it the safeguard of the nation 
it must be broader and higher. It should 
reach as high as heaven and deep enough 
to raise the most degraded soul. 

The education of the child should be 
as one writer has said, begin one hundred 
years before it is born, and if it is trained 
properly, and with a view to produce not 
bodies alone as did the Spartans, but 
good, sound, moral characters, we should 
see in future generations a people as hon- 
est and honorable as the Puritans, who 
needed no lock or key to protect life or 
property. 

To reduce the amount of criminality 
every paper should be quarantined. So- 
ciety should be taught to remove the 
dregs from beneath the froth, and let a 
spirit of altruism exist throughout the 
length and breadth of nations. 

Sheridan Garman, '9 6 - 



The New South. 



Soon after our forefathers left their 
native land to seek refuge in the wilds 
of America, there was fostered upon our 
soil a curse that not only oppressed the 
negro and destroyed his social and edu- 
cational advancement, but retarded as 
well the progress and development of the 
white population. With the introduction 
and promotion of the slave trade tn 
South presented a vastly different apP e . ar fl 
ance from the now prosperous conditio 



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THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



101 



in which we find her to-day. Education 
was neglected ; labor was dishonored ; 
invention and industry minimized. With 
these retarding forces at work that part 
of our country so rich in all its natural 
resources was hindered in its progress for 
over three centuries, and only the wisdom 
of a Lincoln at the head of our govern- 
ment could see and fully realize the con- 
dition of affairs, and at the appropriate 
time strike the death blow to this relic of 
barbarism. When he uttered the mem- 
orable words, "I will sign it for it is 
right," and issued that famous proclama- 
tion which not only liberated thousands 
of slaves, but burst the bands of ignor- 
ance and indifference from the white peo- 
ple, he opened the gates to a bright and 
glorious future for our "Sunny South," 
and then for the first time in almost a 
hundred years did the people of our 
country recognize the words of the 
eclaration of Independence that "all 
en are created free and equal." 
Thirty years ago the South, swept by 
the storm of civil war, lay prostrate and 
helpless. Its manufacturing and other in- 
dustrial systems were shattered to pieces. 
All agricultural interests were in con- 
fusion. Railroads, so important in their 
relation to neighboring prosperity, were 
destroyed, thus entirely ruining com- 
merce and all trade. Financially the 
South was bankrupt. Unrest, poverty, 
despair were universal. All stood face 
to face with a future of perplexity and 
uncertainty. 

In this sad plight the New South was 
ushered into historic existence. In this 
state of almost utter despair the people 
stood transfixed by the oppressive dark- 
ness of that hour which was just before 
the dawn of a new epoch ; and that dawn 
soon came, breaking with the brilliant 
light of prosperity above the heavy 
clouded horizon, awakening the people 
to new strength, new hope, new energy 
and new life, all of which combined in 
solemn pledge to make the New South. 
But as the distress incident to war passed 
away and the sky became luminous with 
hope, the people began to realize their 
Possibilities, and by uniting their efforts 
Jo build anew the New South sprang into 
°eing on a firmer foundation, which since 
ta en has only been attended with con- 
stant progress and almost universal suc- 
cess. The great progress of the South 
has been due to the immediate attention 



given to the educational and industrial 
welfare. 

Prior to the war education was con- 
sidered of minor importance. 'Tis true, 
men and women of culture and refine- 
ment were found all over the South, but 
all around them moved the ignorant and 
untaught. Not so to-day. With their 
new creation has come the new and strong 
desire for universal education, and as a 
result, schools for public instruction and 
well equipped institutions for higher edu- 
cation are found throughout the entire 
South, and now where ignorance reigned, 
supreme education has triumphed and the 
educated man predominates. 

This advancement in education has 
broken down many of the barriers of so- 
cial distinction and created a much higher 
moral standard insuring more rigid 
punishment for crime and in Sabbath ob- 
servance the principal States in the South 
are in advance of the North. 

To note the industrial advancement we 
need but recall the recent Atlanta Expo- 
sition which was the outcome of their in- 
dustrial activities. There was displayed 
the advancement the new South has 
made in its manufacturing, mining and 
agricultural interests. With their re- 
cently united efforts, wonderful advance- 
ment has been made in the workshop and 
in the mine. Where once manufactured 
articles were rare can now be found all 
the various forms of machinery as also 
many of the various articles that enter 
into common use. Mines so recently un- 
touched are now being uncovered and 
their treasures unearthed, surprising the 
natives with the amount of coal, iron, 
manganese, zinc, lead and marble that is 
being added to their general wealth. Now 
the South is being overrun with a net- 
work of railway systems which increases 
commerce and trade and adds to the 
o-eneral wealth of the country. 
& Although, prior to the war, all the 
energy of the southern people seemed to 
have & been directed toward the agricul- 
tural welfare, and the general wealth of 
the country derived from this source, yet 
even here the revised plan of work has 
caused a marked increase. With the im- 
proved machinery and skilled workmen, 
the agricultural products are increasing 
vearlv The cotton yield has increased 
five fold in ten years. The fruit orchards 
are sufficient to supply almost the entire 
demand of the United States. The forests 



102 



THE COLLEGE FOR UM. 



are loaded with timber and an energetic 
people, together with a favorable climate, 
prophesy a bright future for our Sunny 
South, and now, while the educational 
and industrial progress of our new South 
is so marked, and along these two lines 
success assured, there is another question 
that has occupied the minds of men for 
thirty years, and is the living problem of 
the South to-day. What of the negro? 
What has he done with his freedom? 
What will he do in the future? The 
negroes have become a part of the United 
States, for they are surely here to stay, 
and although their past has been gloomy, 
yet there is a bright future in store for 
them. The only way in which they can 
become good citizens is through educa- 
tion, and in the thirty years of their 
freedom they have made marked improve- 
ment in their condition. Where then, not 
one in a thousand could read, now there 
are twenty-five thousand who are able to 
be professors and teachers ; where then 
they did not have one church they now 
have nearly twenty- thousand, they them- 
selves supporting most of their churches 
and schools. Surely this is commendable 
and encouraging fot a race that so re- 
cently was in entire ignorance and bond- 
age. They appeal for education for it is 
the only instrument that will raise them 
from their present degraded condition 
and place them on political and moral 
equality with the white man. Although 
his advancement will be checked for a 
time, he will rise gradually. He may 
never stand on the same social plane with 
the white man, but politically and 
morally he can and will for education 
will place him there. 

Then when the American Negro is 
lifted from his present condition of 
drudgery and his education placed on an 
equal basis with the education of his 
white brother then, and not till then will 
he become true loyal and beneficial citi- 
zens of our grand Republic. With an 
increasing capital, with great mining, 
manufacturing and agricultural resources 
all upheld by the energy of an enthusi- 
astic and entirely intelligent people, it is 
not difficult for one to foresee that be- 
neath the f skies of our Sunny South, 
there is about to open a period of advance- 
ment which united with our already 
richly enhanced and prosperous North, 
will make our country a country the 
greatness of which has never been seen 



by mortal eye, and the glory of which 
will be the wonder and admiration of the 
whole world. 

ESTELI/E STEHMAN, '96. 

Class Poem. 

Days, months and years are gliding by, 
Bearing a record, as they fly, 

Of joys and woes ; 
Telling glad tales of work begun, 
Telling of labor nobly done, 

And vanquished foes. 

'Tis not alone time sweeps along, 

But mankind, in one countless throng, 

Joins in the race ; 
Part to the land of drear unrest, 
Part to the kingdom of the blest, 

By God's own grace. 

Marking the journey day by day, 
Milestones are placed along the way, 

By wise decree ; 
Some that the past may be reviewed, 
Some that lost strength may be renewed, 

By such as we. 

The highway, trodden, fades from sight ; 
Day yields to day, night follows night. 

Men laugh, men sigh, 
While landmarks at increasing rate, 
Grim sentinels of ruling fate, 

Go gliding by. 

Too soon has come our parting place ; 
This stone once passed, and each must face 

His course alone. 
Strong in the strength of days gone by, 
Firm tread the road, and hopeful die, 

Though spirit groan. 
Beside this stone, so white and fair, 
As if an angels' special care 

Had made it so ; 
A moment only can we pause, 
Frail creatures of eternal laws, 
Ere on we go. 
Though joy surrounds us everywhere, 
And music fills the perfumed air, 

Not long we rest ; 
Fade must the pleasure of these hours, 
Fade as a dream in summer bowers, 

God wills — 'tis best. 
Classmates, farewell, our hearts must feel 
Such pain as God alone can heal ; 

Our ways divide, 
We may ne'er meet in time's domain, 
Nor till, and be it to our gain, 

We cross the tide. 
All glory to Jehovah be, 
Who rules the land, who calms the sea, 

Who loves our race ; 
For He, unseen, is ever near, 
A comrade, tho' the way be drear, 

And swift the pace. 
O thou whom angels love to serve, 
Teach us thy precepts to observe, 

And faithful be ! 
So that upon the journey's end, . ^ 

Friend may commune, and dwell with ir 

Eternally. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



103 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM is published monthly through- 
out the college year by the Philokosmian Literary Society 
of Lebanon Valley t'olleere. 

H. CLAY DEANEK, '79, Editor-in-Chief. 



ASSISTANT EDITORS. 

H. H. Heberly, '96. Ira E. Albert, '97. 

N. C Schlichter, '97. Jacob Zerbe, '98. 

BUSINESS DFPARTJIENT. 

H. Clay Deatjer, '79, Publisher. 

W. G. Clippinger, '98, Business Manager. 

C. H. Sleichter, "96, Assistant Business Manager. 



Terms: Twenty-five cents a year, five cents per copy. 

THE COLLEGE FORUM will be forwarded to all sub- 
scribers until an order is received for its discontinuance, 
and until all arrearages have been paid. 

Address all business communications to W. G. 
Clippinger, Annvilie, Pa. 

Address all communications for publication, ex- 
changes, etc., to Box 77G, Annvilie, Pa. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annvilie, Pa., as 
Becond-class mail matter. 



)£ tutorial. 



The Fall term of the College will open 
on September 7. Throughout the co- 
operating territory of the Church, strong 
efforts should be immediately made to 
have the halls filled during the coming 
year. Let every pastor help in this and 
make the future far brighter than the 
past. 

This is the last issue of the Forum 
for the school-year, as is customary with 
college journals generally. We will let 
our editorial pens be dry for a time. 
Our fullest intention is to make the 
Forum an able exponent of our College, 
and we trust our friends will help us by 
subscribing. 



The present issue is given up almost 
entirely to the news of Commencement. 
The Class of Ninety-six is to be con- 
gratulated on their successful exercises, 
which we believe were fully as interest- 
ing throughout as those of any other 
class ever graduated at the College. 

We take pleasure to call the attention 
of our readers to the full-page cut of the 



class of 1896, composed of ten members, 
which appears in this number of The 
Forum. Two of them expect to enter 
the ministry, two the professfon of medi- 
cine, two will return to pursue post-grad- 
uate work and two will engage in teach- 
ing; the rest are undecided. Seven are 
members, or are from families of the 
United Brethren Church; two of the 
Lutheran, and one of the Congregational 
Church. The average age of the class is 
twenty-one years. 

Trustee Meeting. 

The Board of Trustees met in annual 
session on Tuesday morning, June 16th, 
at 9 o'clock. 

The devotional exercises were con- 
ducted by Rev. J. T. Spangler. 

The following members were present : 
J. T. Spangler, H. H. Kreider, Jno. A. 
Keiper, Solomon L. Swartz, Reno. S. 
Harp, Jno. H. Maysilles, Isaac H. Al- 
bright, Samuel W. Clippinger, Adam 
R. Forney, Isaac B. Haak, Charles A. 
Mutch, William H. Washinger, Daniel 
Eberly, Jno. B. Stehman, C. J. Kephart, 
Samuel F. Engle, A. S. Riland, William 
A. Lutz and Hiram B. Dohner. 

Bishop E. B. Kephart was elected Pre- 
sident- Rev. H. B. Dohner, Vice-Presi- 
dent, and Rev. I. H. Albright, Secretary. 

The following committees were ap- 
pointed: 

Endowment. —Messrs. Albright, Bier- 
man, Forney, Engle and Lutz. 

Faculty.— Messrs. Spangler, Kreider, 
Washinger, Dohner and Harp. 

Library and Apparatus. — Messrs. 
Deaner, Keiper, McDermad, Good and 

Finance. — Messrs. Kreider, Eberly, 
Kephart, Swartz and Haak. 

Grounds and Buildings— Messrs. Steh- 
man, Maysilles, Clippinger, Lehman and 

Rl Auditing-.— Messrs. McDermad, Clip- 
pinger and Lutz. 

The minutes of the Executive Com- 
mittee for the past year were read and 
after some discussion unanimously ap- 

^The Treasurer of the College, Mr. H. H. 
Kreider, made the following report ot 
moneys received and paid out during the 
year : 



104 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Receipts. 



Boarding and Tuition $5, 974.71 

Music, etc 580.75 

"College Day" collections 3 T 9-33 

Endowment interest 640.00 

Rent 278.00 

Post-graduate 10.00 

Donations '. 55-68 

Old Accounts 250.00 

Diplomas 30.00 

Amount overpaid 2.21 



Total $8,140.68 

EXPENDITURES. 

Domestic Department $3,206.25 

Teachers' Salaries 2,772.00 

Insurance 97.23 

College Association 5.00 

Janitors' Service 381.00 

Steward's Salary 200.00 

Traveling Expenses 75. 10 

Advertising *3-75 

Postage^and Expressage 9.40 

Interest and Discount 1,198.53 

Old Accounts 100.00 

Repairing, etc 82.42 



Total $8,140.68 



The Librarian, Prof. McDermad, re- 
ported that there had been added during 
the past year sixty-eight new books to 
the library, among them the newly pub- 
lished Historical Reference Cyclopedia, a 
work of great merit. The library is ex- 
tensively used by the students of the col- 
lege. Better quarters are needed. 

The Committee on Library, among 
other things, suggested a Library Re- 
ception, to be held under the auspices of 
the Faculty, on the twenty-second day 
of February, 1897. 

The Committee on Grounds and Build- 
ings made a number of desirable recom- 
mendations, and highly commended the 
neatness, cleanliness, order and economy 
of the management of the domestic de- 
partment. 

The Auditing Committee made a re- 
port stating that they had carefully ex- 
amined every item in the accounts and 
that they had found the same correct in 
every particular. 

President Bierman presented his annual 
report, in which he spoke of the special 
needs of the College, and strongly urged 
the devising of some plan to relieve the 
institution of its present indebtedness. 
One hundred and forty students were 
in attendance, an increase of twenty-three 
over last year. The following recom- 
mendations were made for graduation : 



In Music. — Misses Ella N. Black, Os- 
teite Stehman, Bertha Mayer, Mary E. 
Kreider, E. Ruth Mumma and Mr. How- 
ard G. Henry. 

Bachelor of Science. — Misses Ella 
N. Black, Bertha Mumma and Estelle 
Stehman and Messrs. Harry H. Heberly, 
'"Sheridan Garman and Charles H. Sleich- 
ter. 

Bachelor of Arts.— J. Alexander 
Jenkins. 

Master of Arts. — Rev. Win. H. 
Washinger, A. B., Class of 1891 ; Mr. 
John L. Meyer, A. B., Class of 1893, and 
Mr. Samuel T. Meyer, A. B., Class of 
1893. 

Doctor of Philosophy. — G.W. Han- 
ger, A. M., Class of 1884, °f Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

For the honorary degree of Doctor op 
Divinity. — Rev. Charles Roads, of Phil- 
adelphia. 

The report was received and the recom- 
mendations unanimously adopted. 

The Committee on Faculty reported in 
favor of the reelection of President Bier- 
man and Professors Deaner, Lehman, 
McDermad, Misses Allis and Smith, and 
referred the supplying of vacancies to the 
Executive Committee. The. report was 
adopted. 

The Finance Committee reported a 
plan which, makes the President of the 
College financial manager, and which 
contemplates the securing of money to 
cover the entire indebtness of the insti- 
tution. The details of the plan will be 
published hereafter. 

The following trustees were elected 
members of the Executive Committee: 
Messrs. H. H. Kreider, Isaac B. Haak, 
W. H. Washinger, C. J. Kephart, Isaac 
H. Albright, Reno S. Harp and A. R. 
Forney. President Bierman is member 
ex- officio. 

The Committee on Endowment made 
a report which was adopted. 

H. H. Kreider was reelected Treasurer 
of the College, and John H. Maulfair 
was reelected Steward for the ensuing 
year. 

The Board adjourned sine die on Wed- 
nesday evening, after two days' earnest 
and thoughtful consideration and discus- 
sion of the various interests of the Col- 
lege. To labor more devotedly than 
ever to make the College a success, was 
the prevailing sentiment among the 
trustees. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



105 



Commencement Week. 

SATURDAY EVENING. 

On Saturday evening, June 13, the 
commencement of 1896 was as usual 
opened with a delightful reception ten- 
dered the Faculty and students of the col- 
lege by President and Mrs. Bierman, in 
honor of the Senior Class. The guests 
were received by the President and his 
wife who introduced them to the Senior 
Class. The evening was spent very 
pleasantly in friendly intercourse. Re- 
freshments were served which made any 
one happier for having partaken of them. 

About half-past tec o'clock the guests 
retired with the assurance that the recep- 
tion was a grand opening for the further 
exercises of commencement. 

SUNDAY MORNING. 

As the dawning sun appeared above 
the horizon, hidden by the golden clouds, 
the Seniors began to feel anxious on this 
account, yet notwithstanding the menace 
of nature, a large audience assembled to 
hear the Bishop's parting words of coun- 
sel to the Class of '96. The chapel was 
nicely decorated with choice potted plants 
tastefully arranged. 

At the appointed hour the graduating 
Class entered and took their seats in the 
front part of the chapel, while Dr. Bier- 
man, Bishops Hott and Weaver, and 
Revs. D. D. Lowery and H. B. Dohner 
occupied seats on the rostrum. After 
opening services and an anthem by the 
choir, Bishop Hott announced his text as 
found recorded in Proverbs xxiii : 23, 
and took for his theme "The Truth." 
From the many fruitful suggestions, 
space allows us only to write the follow- 
ing : "Truth is things as they are. 
There are two great principles recognized, 
Production and Exchange or Commerce. 
The text refers to a higher conception. 
Truth has different forms. It is essential 
to success in business. Spiritual and 
divine truth must require our highest at- 
tention. All truth is founded on the 
Oreat-I-Am. Partial truth is a falsehood. 
The form of truth is twofold— abstract or 
ideal and objective or concrete. God's 
revelation is found everywhere. Ideal 
truths are found in the Bible. Christ is 
an objective or concrete truth. We get 
truth by fragments. Every man who 
Would have it must pay for it. A man is 
false to the truth who does not live up to 
the truth acquired. Conquer by truth. 



Don't build on a sandy foundation. Sell 
not the truth. Men sell the truth by 
bartering it for wealth. Wealth can be 
acquired by truth. A man who has the 
truth is strong. A man who tells false- 
hoods is weak. The Bishop closed his 
remarks by giving the graduating class 
fruitful words of advice. 

The venerable Bishop Weaver then 
gave a short address full of timely advice, 
which was followed by closing services. 

SUNDAY EVENING. 

At 7.30 the graduating exercises of the 
Bible Normal Union were held in the 
chapel. Their motto, "Press forward, 
he conquers who will, ' ' was hung in the 
recess of the rostrum. The choir of the 
U. B. church rendered excellent music. 
Prayer was offered by Rev. M. J. Mumnia, 
of Annviile ; scripture was read by Prof. 
H. U. Roop, Ph.D., of the University of 
Pennsylvania ; the address was delivered 
by Rev. B. F. Daugherty, A.M., B.D., 
of Harrisburg. His address was full of 
sound advice for making a useful life. 
Dr. C. J. Kephart, Secretary of the Penn- 
sylvania State Sunday-school Association, 
presented diplomas to the following : 
Misses Bessie Kinports, Katharyn P. 
Mumma, Maud Trabert, Emma Batdorf, 
Blanche Kephart, Sarah Walter, Anna 
Hunsicker, Ella Dean, Ivanora Light, 
Mary E. Richard, Lizzie Richard, Messrs. 
W. Hertzog, I. E. Runk, H. Wagner, 
F. U. Biever, U. B. Brubaker and A. 
Wier. 

MONDAY EVENING. 

The musical commencement was the 
sole event of the day. This began at 
7:30, a large audience being present. 
The tastefully adorned rostrum was occu- 
pied by President Bierman, Stocks Ham- 
mond, Mus. Doc, Misses Carrie M. Flint, 
Carrie E. Smith and the graduating class. 

The following program was rendered : 

Vocal Quartet— "Merry June" • • Vincent. 

MISSES KREIDER, STEHMAN, MUMMA and BLACK. 

INVOCATION. • _ , , 

Piano S0I0-2 Fantaisies op 16 Mendelssohn. 

ESTELLE STEHMAN. 

Piano Solo-Nocturne XII Chopin. 

MARY E. KREIDER. 

Vocal Solo-" Venus and Victory » Hammond. 

\ ocai auiu chas H SLEICHTER . 

Piano Solo-" Impromptu Bb Nc , 3 " Schubert. 

Ella N. Black. . 
Piano Solo-" Der Erlkonig " Schnba t 

rU E- RUTH MUMMA, 

P, a ,,oSo,o_...»P KC cMon ;:i!s . . . ■ . 



106 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Vocal Solo— " Carmena " Wilson. 

Mary E. Kreider. 
presentation of diplomas. 
Piano'Sextet— " Overture D Oberon " . . Weber-Mcreux 
Misses Black, Kreider, Stehman, Mayer, 
Mumma and Mr. Henry. 

The selections were all well rendered, 
as any one might infer from the hearty 
applause which followed every perform- 
ance. The graduates were Misses Ella 
N. Black, Mary E. Kreider, A. Bertha 
Mayer, E. Ruth Mumma, Estelle Steh- 
man and Mr. Howard G. Henry. 

TUESDAY EVENING. 

At 7:30 the Alumni Association held its 
public exercises in the chapel. As usual 
a large audience was present. The exer- 
cises were pleasing and entertaining. 
The following program was rendered : 

Piano Duet—" Galop Scherzando " Sudds. 

Misses Ella and Mabel Saylor. 
INVOCATION. 
Vocal Solo— " With Harp and Crown," . . .Hammond. 

Miss Mary E. Kreider. 
Remarks— By the President, 

Rev. j. T. Spangler, A. M. 

Piano Solo— " Tarantille, op. 43," Chopin. 

Miss M. Ella Moyer. 
Essay— The Glorifying of Life, 

Mrs. Loula Funk-Bowman, B. S. 

Vocal Solo— -'A Winter Lullaby," DcKoven. 

Mr. C J. Barr. 
Oration— Character Building, 

Rev. C. A. Burtner, Ph. D. 
Piano Solo— " Rurnanisch Rhapsodie," . . . . Spindler. 
Mr. Urban H. Hershey. 

Immediately after the rendition of the 
program the annual banquet was served 
by Caterer M. H. Shaud at the Ladies' 
Hall. The first toast was responded to by 
Miss Sara Burns, '73, on "Reminiscences," 
followed by J. A. Jenkins, '96, on " The 
Faculty." Toasts were also given by 
Horace Crider, '93 and Rev. Enck, 91. 
The E. V. C. quartet furnished the music. 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON. 
At 2 P. M. the class held its class-day 
exercises. The weather was very favor- 
able and the people gathered at an early 
hour. The class motto was 1 ' Arbeit 
iiberwindet Alles ! ' ' The remarks of 
every speaker were richly embellished 
with its sublime sentiment. Every per- 
formance on the program was a grand 
success. The following program was 
rendered : 

Vocal Quartet— Misses Stehman,* B. Mumma, Black 
and Mr. Heberly. 

Address by President, C H. Sleichter. 

History Estelle Stehman. 

Instrumental Solo Bertha Mayer. 

Motto Oration Bertha Mumma. 

Prophecy, Ella Black. 

Vocal Solo, C H. Sleichter. 

Awarding the Certificates of Distinction and Proficiency, 
H. H. Heberly. 

Class Poem J. Alex. Jenkins. 

Instrumental Duet, . . Ruth Mumma and H. G. Henry. 

Presentation to Juniors, S. Garman. 

Response, C. B. Wingert. 



CLASS SONG. 
Words by J. Alex . Jenkins. 

Music by H G. Henry, 

What tho' the stars above life's sea 

Be set as guides to liberty. 
'Twould useless be were we not shown 
That we can make these guides our own. 
Chorus :— 

Then onward Ninetv-six 
Naught is too hard for thee, 
■ For Labor Conquers all " 
Press on in majesty. 

What though all nature doth delare 

Herself our slave, surpassing fair ; 
Unless we learn how to command 
Unutilized she too must stand.— Cho. 

What though we know Jehovah reigns. 

That after death the best remains ; 
No comfort this, were not the way 
Made plain to God and endless day. — Cho. 

Our college days have shown us this 

That they who labor not must miss 
The best in life, and can but glide 
Helpless as straws adown the tide — Cho. 

And now to-day we can but feel 

That life, so solemn and so real, 
Is easier made — we owe a debt 
To L- V. C. we'll ne'er forget.— Cho. 

WEDNESDAY EVENING. 

At 7:30 Hon. William N. Ashman, 
LE. D., of Philadelphia, Pa., delivered 
the annual lecture before the literary so- 
cieties of the college. Mr. Chas. H. 
Sleichter and Miss Mary E. Kreider fur- 
nished admirable music. 



Commencement Day. 

THURSDAY, 9 A. M. 

The twenty-seventh annual commence- 
ment exercises of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege took place at nine o'clock Thursday 
morning. The event brought pleasure 
and satisfaction to the gowned graduates, 
and joy and delight to parents, sweet- 
hearts and friends, who crowded the 
chapel to its utmost, that they might see 
the students step from the college halls 
into the world. Promptly at the ap- 
pointed hour the graduating class, Presi- 
dent Bierman and members of the Fac- 
ulty took seats on the platform. The 
rostrum was decorated with palms and 
other potted plants in a most tasteful 
manner. The music was furnished by 
the Perseverance Orchestra, of Lebanon. 

The invocation was pronounced by 
Rev. M. J. Mumma, of Annville. 

The Opening Gates of the Twentieth, 
Ce?itury was the subject of the oration by 
Miss Ella N. Black, of Annville. In sub- 
stance, she referred to the earth, sea ana 
sky as one great pictorial volume, an 
the Bible as the revelation of God. Tne 
speaker spoke of the progress made 1 
medicine, surgery, science, travel on lan ^ 
and sea, in equipments of war, in educa 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



, 107 



tion ; referred to the method of settling 
national disputes by arbitration ; alluded 
to the advancement of woman and the 
important part she is playing in the 
world's betterment in the temperance 
sphere. 

Sheridan Garman, of Shermandale, Pa., 
followed with an oration on Criminality. 
In the course of his oration he spoke of 
the weakness of will power of a criminal ; 
the transmission of criminal instinct ; 
failure of education of the young ; crime 
is like a disease; suicide and murder be- 
come an infection. The sensational story 
is a cause of much crime, and a proper 
education is necessary as a preventative 
of crime. 

National Jealousy was the subject 
treated by H. H. Heberly, of York, Pa. 
He stated that national jealousy has been 
as destructive to nations as war. Carthage 
fell through jealousy. He referred to 
the international harmony of nations and 
the jealousies which have caused disrup- 
tions. National jealousies can not be 
prevented by legislation. The speaker 
closed with the hope that the day is not 
far distant when national jealousy will be 
obliterated. 

The Ideal Education was the title of 
the oration of Miss Bertha Mumma, of 
Annville. She stated that the ideal is 
the advance of the real. In the attain- 
ment of these ideals we are reaching the 
true education. Education is the de- 
velopment into true manhood and woman- 
hood. Intellectual development should 
be general — physical, mentally, and 
above all, morally. 

K Reform in the Treatment of Animals 
was discussed by C. H. Sleichter, of 
Scotland, Pa. He spoke of the reform of 
the treatment of animals as improving. 
The rights of animals are not antagonis- 
tic to the rights of man. It is necessary 
to recognize the rights of animate as we 
do those of men. Education is the 
means for all humanitarian progress. 

The New South was the subject of the 
oration by Miss Estelle Stehman, of 
Mountville. She spoke of the slave 
traffic in the South as being a hindrance 
to the development of the South; after 
the Civil War all was despair and from 
this chaotic state evolved a New South; 
this progress was due to the education 
and industrial advancement made since 
the war; education broke down the bar- 
rier of social and class distinction. The 



speaker closed with hope that the time is 
near when North and South united will 
be the grandest nation on earth. 

Pulpit and Politics was the subject of 
the oration by J. Alex. Jenkins, of Mt. 
Carmel, Pa. He said the ministers of 
the pulpit are a mighty army. Referring 
to the political degeneracy and corruption 
of the times, the speaker believes that in 
order to revolutionize matters it is neces- 
sary for the Christian Church, through 
the pulpit, to act. 

The conferring of degrees followed by 
President Bierman: 

Bachelor of Science — Ella N. Black, 
Bertha Mumma, Annville; Sheridan 
Garman, Shermansdale; H. H. Heberly, 
York; C. A. Sleichter, Scotland; Estelle 
Stehman, Mountville. 

Bachelor of Arts— J. Alexander Jenkins, 
Mt. Carmel. 

Master of Arts— Rev. W. H. Wash- 
inger, Chambersburg; J. L. Meyer and 
S. T. Meyer, Annville. 

Doctor of Philosophy— G.W. Hanger, 
A. M., Washington, D. C. 

Doctor of Divinity— Rev. Charles 
Roads, Philadelphia. 

After the benediction congratulations 
and farewells followed, and the com- 
mencement exercises of '96 will long be 
remembered as being among the best 
of the College for many years. 



Our Alumni. 

'8o. Miss Alice K. Gingrich, M. A., 
professor of piano and harmony in San 
Joaquin Valley College, Woodbridge, 
Cal., was married to the- Rev. A. L. 
Cowell, A. M., B. D., President of the 
above named college, on the 23d day of 
May, 1896. We tender our congratula- 
tions. 

'84. Wintou J. Baltzell, A. M., pro- 
fessor of voice and harmony, received the 
degree of Bachelor of Music (B. Mus ; ) at 
the recent commencement of the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania. 

'88. William M. Hain, Esq., a leading 
member of the Dauphin county bar, was 
recently married to Miss Nan Motter, 
daughter of Mr. John Motter, a prominent 
citizen of Harrisburg, Pa. 

'n 4 William H. Kreider, A. B., was 
graduated from the law department of 
Yale University with the degree of Bache- 
lor of Daws (LL. B.) on the 24th day of 



108 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



last month. On examination for admis- 
sion to the bar of the State of Connecti- 
cut he stood at the head of forty-six ap- 
plicants. Mr. Kreider expects to locate 
at Lebanon, Pa., to practice law. 

'94. Miss Maggie Strickler, A. B., 
was recently elected teacher of modern 
languages and literature in Toulon Acad- 
emy, in the State of Illinois. 

'96. Rev. Sheridan Garman was mar- 
ried to Miss Katie Light, daughter of 
Solomon R. Light, of Annville, Pa., on 
the evening of the 19th of last month. 
Rev. Dr. Burtner, of York, assisted by 
Rev. Mr. Renn, performed the cer monies.- 

'96. Harry H. Heberly has entered 
upon a course of reading in the office of a 
prominent physician in York, Pa., pre- 
paratory to entering a medical college 
early in the fall. 



Baseball. 

Our club has had a successful baseball 
season, winning eight out of nine games 
played. The fifth game of the season 
was played on May 23d, with Albright 
Collegiate Institute, at Myerstown. A 
large crowd of students accompanied the 
club and helped it to victory with vigor- 
ous cheering. Score, 9 to 4. 

On Decoration Day a game was played 
with the strong Lebanon team. The 
game was won in the ninth inning by 
our team's bunching of their hits. The 
pitching of Sleichter, and Kreider' s heavy 
hitting were features of the game. We 
give the score by innings : 

L. V. C, .... 1 o o o 1 o o o 6 — 8 
Lebanon, ....30100003 o — 7 

On June 6th we played with the strong 
Extempore Club, which is composed of 
most gentlemanly players. They came 
with a full determination of winning 
from us, but were disappointed, as the 
score shows : 

L. V. C, . . . . o 1 4 o 1 o o 2 x — 8 
Extempore ...01 100000 o — 2 

On June 13th we met our first defeat. 
Albright Colleqiate Institute paid us a 
visit. They came smarting from the 
heavy stroke of two previous defeats, and 
went into the game with a rush. Their 
umpire was none of the best. The score 
was 7 to 5. 

On Thursday of Commencement Week 
the last game was played with Colebrook. 
The game was marked by numerous er- 



rors, but after a struggle we were victo- 
rious by the score of 10 to 9. A large 
crowd saw the game. We can only hope 
for as successful a season next year. We 
are sorry to lose so good a pitcher as 
Sleichter, who has graduated, and wish 
him always well. 



Ill a Literary Way. 

The Lotus has outgrown college man- 
agement and is now a solidly-founded 
literary magazine. Philemon Garrique 
has recently contributed some powerful 
prose — powerful for its mystery and 
originality. Clinton Scollard, the rising 
young poet, printed his beautiful poem, 
" Wanderers," in the number of June 1. 
A prize of five dollars is offered for the 
best original contribution in verse or 
prose on The Symbolism of the Lotus 
Flower. The Lotus is found on news- 
stands for five cents. 

The June Bachelor of Arts is a number 
of peculiar value for several reasons. No 
one would wish to miss the essay on Paul 
Verlaine, the dead and pitied French 
poet, and by much less, Camp's article 
about Yale. The poets are all "men 
of power" at verse-making — Scollard, 
Cheny, Goodale and Curtis Way. Last, 
but not least, the "Editorial Notes" 
are set in the paper as gems in a ring. 
They are the life of the whole. The Bach- 
elor is published in New York at three 
dollars a year. 

"A Woman's Way," a story of many 
excellencies, by Jeannette Scott Benton, 
opens the June New Bohemian. The en- 
tire contents are imbued with the spirit 
of entertainment, and the dull lines are 
yet to be seen by us. Percival Pollard, 
the novelist, and Susie M. Best are down 
as contributors, with others of merit. The 
review of ' ' Etidorpha ' ' is cleverly done 
by J. Soule Smith in an essay that re- 
veals much study on his part. The Bo- 
hemian is ten cents at all news-stands. 



College Day. 

The day was very generally observed 
by the pastors of our congregations, and 
returns are coming in slowly. 

President Bierman visited and spent a 
Sabbath with each of the following 
congregations: Salem, Baltimore, Md-, 
Chambersburg and Mechanicsburg, this 
State. His addresses on education i n 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



109 



general and in the interest of the College 
rere well received and the contributions 
,rere liberal. The following reports have 
:ome in: 

^hambersburg, $35-64 

Annville, 23.91 

[echanicsburg, 10.22 

Salem, Lebanon, 5.16 

[ummelstown, 5.70 

[ount Joy, 10.00 

ititz 2.60 

first Church, York, 6.50 

Lancaster, 4.25 

Columbia, 9.04 

Jphrata, 9.00 

Grantville, 6.00 

Highspire, 2.93 

Mountville, 12.00 

Paradise, 8.50 

New Holland, 3.17 

Centreville, 2.45 

Total to date $i57-°7 

Professor Lehman and Mr. Walter G. 
Clippinger, class of '98, addressed the 
Salem congregation, Lebanon, on "Col- 
lege Day," and Mr. Raymond P. Dough- 
erty, class of '97, was among those who 
spoke at Trinity, Lebanon, on the same 
day. 



Despair. 

low bleak the thought of a moonless night ! 
How dull the sight of a sunless morn ! 
How dark the plains of a human heart 
To which no ray from a hope-star is born. 

Norman C. Schlichter, '97- 



A bigot cares more for a straw point- 
ing his way than for a hurricane blowing 
another way. — Exchange. 



He that will not permit his wealth to 
do any good to others while he is living 
prevents it from doing any good to him- 
self when he is dead, and by an egotism 
that is suicidal and has a double edge, 
cuts himself off from truest pleasure here 
and highest happiness hereafter. — Colton. 



A man may be an eternal failure, al- 
though his footsteps glitter with gold and 
his words sparkle with knowledge. Tr at 
man is the most successful in the divine 
kingdom who sets in motion the greatest 
amount of spiritual power, power for the 
glory of God, whatever may be the opin- 
ions or rewards of fallen mortals. — Reid. 



Not the greatest man is the most inde- 
pendent. The highest is that which needs 
the highest, the largest that which needs 
the most. Not the largest or strongest 
nature feels a loss the least. An ant 
will not gather a grain of corn the less 
that his mother is dead ; a boy will turn 
from books, play, dinner, because his bird 
is dead. — George Macdonald. 



Good advice is more easily given than 
taken. Many a superintendent who thinks 
himself quite competent to give good ad- 
vice to his teachers in their methods of 
work is not himself open to the receiving 
of good advice from his teachers. It is 
well to bear in mind that he who cannot 
accept advice graciously, is not likely to 
be able to give advice acceptably. 



The keynote was struck by Glad- 
stone when he said: "What is really 
wanted is to light up the spirit that is 
within a boy. In some effectual degree, 
there is in every boy the material of good 
work in the world ; in every boy, not only 
in those who are brilliant, not only in 
those who are quick, but in those who 
are stolid, and even those who are dull." 
Now if every teacher in the land did but 
fully realize the truthfulness of this state- 
ment, it would be a grand stimulus to 
him to put greater effort than he has ever 
done before to develop in the boy the 
power to do something and to be some- 
thing in the working world. 

Church and school in Germany are 
considerably agitated over the proposed 
introduction of what is there called a 
"school Bible." This is practically an 
excerpted edition of the Scriptures, in- 
tended to be used chiefly in the school- 
room and for family reading. It is 
claimed that there are, in many parts and 
portions of the Scriptures, references to 
the relation of the sexes, oriental imagery 
and the like, which are unsuitable for 
children ; and it is also maintained that 
the Scriptures at times mention evils and 
sins without condemning them, and that 
in the interest of morality these sections 
should not be read by children. A whole 
literature from theological and pedagog- 
ical sources has sprung up in recent 
months, the liberally inclined as a rule 
favoring the introduction of such a book, 
the conservatives and confessionals op- 
posing it.— Meriden Journal. 



110 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



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QUMBEKLAND VALLEY RAILROAD. 

TIME TABLE— May 17, 1896. 



Dowx Trains. 




No. 2 


No. 4 


No. 6 


No. 8 


No.10 






*A. M. 


tA.lt. 
7 20 


fP.M. 


tP. M. 

2 35 


*P.M. 








8 02 




3 22 








6 30 


8 48 


12 20 


4 10 


910 






6 51 


9 10 


12 42 


4 33 


935 








7 45 




2 50 








7 12 


9 33 


1 04 


5 05 


10 00 








800 


11 40 


400 








7 32 


9 53 


1 24 


5 27 


10 20 






7 51 


10 11 


1 41 


5 48 


10 39 






816 


10 35 


2 05 


6 15 


1103 






8 43 


10 56 


2 27 


6 38 


11 25 






6 50 


9 30 


200 


600 


1145 






9 03 


11 15 


2 45 


7 00 






P. M. 
1217 


P. M. 

3 00 


p. sr. 

5 47 


P. M. 
11 15 


A. M. 

4 30 






2 33 


5 53 


8 23 


3 53 


7 33 






12 20 


3 10 


6 15 


10 40 


6 20 






P. If. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P.M. 


A. M. 



* Daily. 



fDaily except Sunday. 



Additional trains will leave Carlisle for Harrisburg daily 
except Sunday at 5.45 a. m., 7.00 n. m., 12.30 p. m., 3.4o p. Mg, 
and 8.05 p. m., aud from Mechanicsburg at 6.10 a. m., i.*> 
a. m., 9.54 a. m., 12.55 p. m., 4.10 p. m., 5.10 p. m., andS.3Up. 
m., stopping at Second St., Harrisburg, to let off passengers. 

Nos. 2 and 10 run daily between Harrisburg and Hagerstown. 

Through coach from Hagerstown to Philadelphia on traiu 
No. 4. 



Up Train's. 



. Baltimore 

New York .. .. 
Philadelphia.. 



Harrisburg 

Dillsburg 

Mechanicsburg . 

Carlisle 

Newville 

Shippensburg.... 

Waynesboro 

Chambersburg.. 

Mercersburg 

Greencastle 

Hagerstown 

Martinsburg 

. Winchester 



No. 1 No. 3 No. 5 No. 7 



tP. M. 

11 50 
8 00 
11 20 

A. M. 

5 00 



5 19 

5 40 

6 05 
6 23 



6 43 

"fio 

7 30 

8 20 

9 00 
A. M. 




*Daily. 



fDaily except Sunday. 



Additional local trains will leave Harrisburg dailj > g £ 
Sunday, for Carlisle and intermediate stations ai ■■ ^ 
m., 2.25 p. m., 5.20 p. m., 6.20 p. m., and 10. *> ' ; l7 a . 
also for Mechanicsburg and Intermediate BtononB » d 
m., 12.40 p. m. All of the above trains will stop at a 
St., Harrisburg, to take on passengers. tratrprstown. 
Nos. 3 and 9 run daily between Harrisburg and t v ain8 
Through coach from Philadelphia to Hagerstown o" 
Nos. 5 and 9. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Ill 





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Standard of the U. S. 

Gov't Printing Office, the 
IT. S. Supreme Court,and of 
nearly all the Schoolhooks. 

Warmly commended 

by State Superintendents 
of Schools, and other 
Educators almost without 
number. 

THE BEST FOR EVERYBODY 

> BECAUSE 

It is easy to find the word wanted. 

Words are given their correct alphabetical places, each 

one beginning a paragraph. 
It is easy to ascertain the pronunciation. 

The pronunciation is indicated by the ordinary diacrit- 

ically marked letters used in the schoolbooks. 
It is easy to trace the growth of a word. 

The etymologies are full, and the different meanings are 

given in the order of their development. 
It is easy to learn what a word means. 

The definitions are clear, explicit, and full, and each is 

contained in a separate paragraph. 

G. & C. MERRIAM CO., Publishers, 
Springfield, Mass., U. S. A. 

V&~ Specimen pages, etc., sent on application. 



oooooooooooop 

O Schoolbooks All publishers O 

O Prepaid to any Alphabetical Cata- \J) 

C\ point logue Q 

r\ New — Second Free if you mention r-\ 

vJ hand this ad Jx^ 

O ARTHUR HINDS & CO. O 

(_) 4 Cooper Institute, New York City (_) 

ooooooooooooo 



LEMBERGER & GO., 
DRUGGISTS . AND . PHARMACISTS, 

Ninth and Cumberland Sts., Lebanon, Pa. 

Our Claim in all we do : 

QUALITY— Of First Importance. — ACCURACY. 
* L. LEMBERGER. FRANK GLKIM. 



^ Jolt and Cyclone Proof. ^ 




& All Brass, Nickel Plated and ft 
*r Burns Kerosene Oil. °* 

ooooooooooooooooooooooooo 

§The Pathlight§ 

o ® 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

«fl A beautiful, thoroughly 
if made and finely finished If 
a! Bicycle Lamp. 41 
* They who ride must see if 
the road. "The Pathlight" *v 
Sj; makes bright the way. f |? 



Sent to any part of the country (ex- 
press prepaid) on receipt of price, S4.o0. 
(Maybe you can buy it of your local dealer 
for less.) 

THE PLACE & TERRY MFG. CO., 
247 Centre St., New York, 



Zfc *3fc 9$* 



TF vou wish to advertise anything anywhere at anytime 
I write to GEO. P. BOWELL & CO., No. 10 Spruce Street 

New York. 

tivurv nne in need or information on the subject of ad- 
E V vertfsing wUl do well to obtain a copy of "Book for 
Advertisers" 368 pages, price one dollar. Mailed, postage 
^1™ . receipt of price Contains a careful compilation from 

ELL'S ADVERTISING BUREAU, 10 Spr 
York. 



Spruce Street, New 



T R. M C CAULY, 

J DAILY MEAT MARKET. 

GOOD MEA^ 1 J : 02_______ ^ ANNVILLE ' PA ' 

People wishing a strictly first-class 

PHOTOGRAPH 

Should go to 

Cole's Elite Studio, 

No. 833 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



112 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



^yiLLIAM KIEBLER, 

SHA VING AND HAIR DRESSING, 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop, Annville, Pa. 

JVC. II. SHAUD, 

DEALER IN 

Gold Watches and Jewelry, 

Wholesale and Ketail Dealer In 
FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYS- 
TERS AND CREA3I. ANNVILLE, PA 



S. M. SHENK S BAKERY, 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

FRESH BREAD, CAKES AND ROLLS, 

One Door West Penn'a House, Ann vile. 

S. 33. WAGNER, 

— Headquarters For — 

GROCERIES, CONFECTIONERIES 

OYSTERS, FRUITS AND NUTS. 

Restaurant Attached. Meals at All Hours. 

12 West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
JACOB SARGENT, 
^ FASHIONABLE TAILOR, 

18 and 20 Main St., Annville, Pa. 



H 



ARRY ZIMMERMAN, D. D. 8., 
:d:e3itt^.Xj ssoo^s, 

12 West Main Street, ANNVILLE, PA. 

CITY STEAM LAUNDRY, 

RAUCH & WENGERT, Props., 

SNOW FLAKE PRINTING HOUSE, 
A. C. M. HEISTER, Prop., 
FINE JOB PRINTING, 

35 S. White Oak Street, - - Annville, Pa. 

WILLIAM WALTZ, 
FASHIONABLE 
HAIR CUTTING AND SHAVING SALOON, 

West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
H. H. KKEIDEK. JXO. E. HE UK. 

KREIDER & CO., 
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OP 

Hard & Soft Coal, Grain, Seeds Salt & Feed. 

Office : Railroad Street, near Depot, 
Telephone Connection. ANNVILLE, PA. 

*HE BEST STOCK, THE LOWEST 

1MMCES IX 

FURNITURE^osepTmTTlers 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



T 



F. W. FROST, 
BOOK BINDER AND BLANK BOOK 
MANUFACTURER, 

783 Cumberland St., - - Lebanon, Pa. 



If yon want to Buya Hat rignt, and a right Hat, or anything j 
Men's Furnishings, 

GO TO 

EEB cSS CRA.UMEE, 

Successors to RAITT &. Co., 
Eighth and Cumberland Sis., Lebanon, Pa. 

ANNVILLE, PA., 

Dealers in Dry Goods, Notions 

and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home-made, 
Ingrain and Brussels Carpets. You buy Cheaper 
from us than away from home, and have a large 
stock to select from. 



Ripans 
Ripans 
Ripans 
Ripans 
Ripans 
Ripans 
Ripans 
Ripans 
Ripans 



Tabules 
Tabules 
Tabules 
Tabules 
Tabules 
Tabules 
Tabules 
Tabules 
Tabules 



: at druggists, 
cure dizziness, 
cure headache, 
cure flatulence, 
cure dyspepsia, 
assist digestion, 
cure bad breath, 
cure biliousness. 



J- 



S. KENDIG, 

13 jftb. ICE* , 

Next Door to Eagle Hotel, Annville, Pa. 



jg B. MARSHALL, M. D., 

No, 34 East Main Street, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

DESIGNING. WOOD ENGRAVING. 

PHOTO-ENGRAVING. 

Pennsylvania Engraving Co., 

114 to 120 S. 7th Street, PHILADELPHIA, 
COLLEGE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

A. C ZIMMERMAN, 

DEALER IN 

Carpels, Bugs and Oil Cloft 

No. 758 Cumberland St., 
LEBANON, PA.